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I like film...(open thread)

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On 1/24/2020 at 5:44 PM, fotomas said:

 

M6, 35mm CronASPH1, Fuji Reala

super blues in this one 👌

14 hours ago, philipus said:

Cool, thanks heaps Adam. The rise feature is an obvious selling point for me. Time to hunt :)

I'd suggest giving Paula at Linhof Studio in the UK a call.  She has pretty good prices - and she might be able to source a good second hand copy...

14 hours ago, philipus said:

We're now back in Tbilisi. A Swedish friend who knows the city showed me the underground system (and a few other locations, more to come), which is functional or perhaps "serviceable" works better (hint hint to The only living boy in New York, which incidentally is worth watching). Here's an action shot from an escalator. Slow shutter speed camera braced against the rubber railing. I don't think I've ever seen an escalator in that colour before. Rog, would it be amaranth(-ish)? 


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80 Planar Ektar X1

wow this is awesome, Philip!!   Very dynamic!

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vor 46 Minuten schrieb A miller:

A vertical pano from the Dead Sea with Velvia 50

Technorama 617siii, 90mm

Would love to be there. In my hometown it is bloody cold now! Sell the photo to the Ministry of Tourism Adam!

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On 1/23/2020 at 9:45 PM, philipus said:

Well some shots don't really work out at all, by which I mean that once the film's been pulled out of the light-tight box, developed and scanned there's a jagged disconnect between the impression I had when I envisioned and composed the shot and what I see on the screen. Like this one. A blown-out building in New Rustavi, Georgia, which I thought would look really cool because of all the horizontal and vertical lines. But seeing it now, I'm not happy. I ought to have allowed for air on the sides and to let those diagonals there, which I only see now, breathe. And I should have lined up the verticals better with the PC Mutar (to obviate the need for Photoshop trickery), though I think it was raised to its maximum here so I would have had to move back but there was a building and a road and people, and there's sometimes just no competing with reality so one had better simply give up and move on. Some shots are not made to be made :wacko:

But as it is often said, to end this ramble on a slightly more positive note, those who live in the past or with the what could've beens are never happy, so I choose to embrace the suck and post it anyway :D


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40 Distagon CFE+PC Mutar Ektar X1

Philip, Philip Philip... While I accept that there was a disconnect between what you visualized and what you found on the film, you are being harshly self-critical to not see what a wonderful picture this really is. It is PRESENT unlike so many architectural pictures. In fact I look at this as a strongly SOCIOLOGICAL picture, and quite a brilliant one at that. Places like New Rustavi are, I imagine (not having been there), full of the sort of such unpretty, neo-brutalist buildings as you have shown us here. That YOU have traveled to a place that most of us will never visit is something worthy of consideration, too, although I won't touch on that here. There has been some inadequate attempt to add colour - an orange L-shape - to the facade of the building. Inadvertently the crane in the centre adds another splash of colour and both these things simply amplify how bland the rest of the building is. And in the foreground, beyond the pathetic twig that might one day grow into a tree (although I have my doubts) is that CRAAAZY fence pattern - who would come up with something like that? And what on earth are those spotlights going to illuminate? The occupation of your frame smacks us with this cultural misfit and can't help but to make us wonder what the society is like that creates such oddities - and lives in them.

This picture has stayed strongly with me since you posted it and, for what it's worth, I think it is wonderful.

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21 hours ago, stray cat said:

This is INCENDIARY! Rog has rewritten the rules - throw away your rule books! Better still - BURN THEM! Mwahahaha! Fahrenheit 451, the temperature at which paper ignites - and our eyes melt! Who doesn't love the smell of NAPALM in the morning? No, dammit! Anytime! Ray Bradbury would Sing the Body Electric over this if he hadn't been CREMATED. And let's not forget his great aunty or whatever Mary who was tried at SALEM as a witch! What fate befell her?

Of course the theme music to this is "Fire" from 1968 by The Crazy World of Arthur Brown. Hahahahahaha! HeeHeeHeeHee.

Truth be told, I think we're all well over REAL fire, or at least I'm pretty sure we all are down here in Australia. But this work ignites our passions, and isn't that what art is?

Not a pretty sight! No, not a pretty sight of me, flat on my back, feet flailing in the air, in total gut-wrenching laughter! Is there nothing not in your wheelhouse? (How's that for a hot double negative?) You've stacked up so many entertaining allusions that I'm getting delusional. I think this study started, or jump-started, with Klaus's (still life, sort of) study of the frosty leaves. Br-r-r-r. I must be part "bull" (some may say, "Full of it!") because I had this red color field snap that was so, as you would allow, "incendiary." Then, I had taken a snap on my walk of some "nothingness" ground, a cold gray. My mind started wandering to diptychs, as it is prone to do, intrigued by the notion of "temperature," not just color temperature but sensory temperature, how to construct a visual metaphor. Celsius or Fahrenheit? Of course, Fahrenheit, thank you, Ray Bradbury, but I have to stand in the corner, thank you, Dostoevsky, and not think about 451! The diptych would read left to right, cold to hot, obviously. "Orange you glad for the orange?" I asked myself. And, with the added pause of Philip's "intermission," a thin white line, my diptych color thermometer in honor of Daniel Fahrenheit was complete.

Now, I am going to search for a listen of "Fire," as the soundtrack. I am a little giddy at the idea of spontaneous combustion. Madness of Mandelbrot?

Edited by Ernest

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16 minutes ago, stray cat said:

Philip, Philip Philip... While I accept that there was a disconnect between what you visualized and what you found on the film, you are being harshly self-critical to not see what a wonderful picture this really is. It is PRESENT unlike so many architectural pictures. In fact I look at this as a strongly SOCIOLOGICAL picture, and quite a brilliant one at that. Places like New Rustavi are, I imagine (not having been there), full of the sort of such unpretty, neo-brutalist buildings as you have shown us here. That YOU have traveled to a place that most of us will never visit is something worthy of consideration, too, although I won't touch on that here. There has been some inadequate attempt to add colour - an orange L-shape - to the facade of the building. Inadvertently the crane in the centre adds another splash of colour and both these things simply amplify how bland the rest of the building is. And in the foreground, beyond the pathetic twig that might one day grow into a tree (although I have my doubts) is that CRAAAZY fence pattern - who would come up with something like that? And what on earth are those spotlights going to illuminate? The occupation of your frame smacks us with this cultural misfit and can't help but to make us wonder what the society is like that creates such oddities - and lives in them.

This picture has stayed strongly with me since you posted it and, for what it's worth, I think it is wonderful.

Ditto every one of the flavorful points of your onion-peeling appreciation of Philip's architectural portrait. I assume, an apartment building. I hopscotch to Kieslowski's Dekalog, and A Short Film About Love, in particular, because the Polish apartment buildings with their faceless, "brutal" look are a psychological mirror of the characters who live in them, the lives they lead. Like a Vermeer painting, the interiors are a psychological portrait. "Neo-brutalist buildings" set off a blip on my radar; not only last week was I reading an article in a Kauai magazine about Brutalist architecture in Hawaii. Brutalism is usually defined by a concrete architectural style popularized in the 50s, but homage must include Breuer and Corbusier, thirty years earlier. Bauhaus architecture is scaled to the human anatomy, unlike Brutalism. Your point that Philip's portrait is sociological is dead solid. The fact you observe that the color is minimal is key, as well: the orange "L" in the upper left that we read first gives way to the blue crane, a statement of construction, transition, a small blue patch, and another small green patch--wedged into the used-looking white honeycomb of apartment cubicles. Individualism sacrificed. Philip's second thoughts about the framing, perhaps, could be allayed by cropping, left and right, emphasizing the building as a flat field, but this is just me.  "And what on earth are those spotlights going to illuminate?" Absolutely! They would illuminate a building behind us, of course, but they have a double signification that instills paranoia. We are being watched. We are under potential scrutiny. Looking at Kieslowski's A Short Film About Love sketches what may be in store for this architectural portrait. Well, maybe not.

Importantly, your sensitive, astute commentary of Philip's work, here, is succinct and inspiring. Thanks so much!

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The car looks almost robot-like :) And those blacks...very nice.

12 hours ago, bokelley said:

1970 BMW 1600

Kodachrome / Olympus OM1

 

 

Aha a bumper selfie! :D As always fantastic development too.

14 hours ago, Xícara de Café said:

Leica IIIf, Summicron 5cm 1:2 collapsible, Ilford FP4+ 125 @ 100, PMK 1:2:100 8"30' 24ºC.

Thank you very much Adam, will do.

10 hours ago, A miller said:

I'd suggest giving Paula at Linhof Studio in the UK a call.  She has pretty good prices - and she might be able to source a good second hand copy...

wow this is awesome, Philip!!   Very dynamic!

Talk about life-like! You should really be paid by the Tourism Board :) 

10 hours ago, A miller said:

A vertical pano from the Dead Sea with Velvia 50

Technorama 617siii, 90mm

Excellent Marc, what an intriguing gaze.

9 hours ago, benqui said:

Tmax 400, M4, Apo 50, (X-Tol 1:1)

Thanks heaps to both of you. This is what is so interesting with photography. Every little photo resonates differently with everyone. There are so many things I didn't even notice myself, like those spotlights, the colour or the absence thereof, the "being watched" aspect which I think is spot on (I'll return to that shortly in another picture) or the bizarre fence or or or. Thanks again for taking the time to comment, it is much appreciated!  

7 hours ago, stray cat said:

Philip, Philip Philip... While I accept that there was a disconnect between what you visualized and what you found on the film, you are being harshly self-critical to not see what a wonderful picture this really is. It is PRESENT unlike so many architectural pictures. In fact I look at this as a strongly SOCIOLOGICAL picture, and quite a brilliant one at that. Places like New Rustavi are, I imagine (not having been there), full of the sort of such unpretty, neo-brutalist buildings as you have shown us here. That YOU have traveled to a place that most of us will never visit is something worthy of consideration, too, although I won't touch on that here. There has been some inadequate attempt to add colour - an orange L-shape - to the facade of the building. Inadvertently the crane in the centre adds another splash of colour and both these things simply amplify how bland the rest of the building is. And in the foreground, beyond the pathetic twig that might one day grow into a tree (although I have my doubts) is that CRAAAZY fence pattern - who would come up with something like that? And what on earth are those spotlights going to illuminate? The occupation of your frame smacks us with this cultural misfit and can't help but to make us wonder what the society is like that creates such oddities - and lives in them.

This picture has stayed strongly with me since you posted it and, for what it's worth, I think it is wonderful.

 

6 hours ago, Ernest said:

Ditto every one of the flavorful points of your onion-peeling appreciation of Philip's architectural portrait. I assume, an apartment building. I hopscotch to Kieslowski's Dekalog, and A Short Film About Love, in particular, because the Polish apartment buildings with their faceless, "brutal" look are a psychological mirror of the characters who live in them, the lives they lead. Like a Vermeer painting, the interiors are a psychological portrait. "Neo-brutalist buildings" set off a blip on my radar; not only last week was I reading an article in a Kauai magazine about Brutalist architecture in Hawaii. Brutalism is usually defined by a concrete architectural style popularized in the 50s, but homage must include Breuer and Corbusier, thirty years earlier. Bauhaus architecture is scaled to the human anatomy, unlike Brutalism. Your point that Philip's portrait is sociological is dead solid. The fact you observe that the color is minimal is key, as well: the orange "L" in the upper left that we read first gives way to the blue crane, a statement of construction, transition, a small blue patch, and another small green patch--wedged into the used-looking white honeycomb of apartment cubicles. Individualism sacrificed. Philip's second thoughts about the framing, perhaps, could be allayed by cropping, left and right, emphasizing the building as a flat field, but this is just me.  "And what on earth are those spotlights going to illuminate?" Absolutely! They would illuminate a building behind us, of course, but they have a double signification that instills paranoia. We are being watched. We are under potential scrutiny. Looking at Kieslowski's A Short Film About Love sketches what may be in store for this architectural portrait. Well, maybe not.

Importantly, your sensitive, astute commentary of Philip's work, here, is succinct and inspiring. Thanks so much!

This has a nice postcard feel. And not having been there I am surprised to see the city in the background. I didn't realise the pyramids are so close.

4 hours ago, Ouroboros said:

Giza #2

Leica MP

50mm elmar-m f2.8

Ektar

 

This is a nice action shot, though at first it doesn't seem to be one. Initially I only saw the cyclists in the foreground, but noticing the ongoing competition in the background I think the image changes. Suddenly the link between the warming up, with the cyclists deep in concentration with the help of headphones playing who knows which tunes, and the performance becomes tangible. 

3 hours ago, Rennrocky said:

Six Days Berlin Leica M2 C40 HP5@1200

 

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9 hours ago, benqui said:

Tmax 400, M4, Apo 50, (X-Tol 1:1)

Beautiful photograph and subject. This is a gaze with which I am familiar.....She has said something; I was distracted- maybe with film  scanning :)- and did not respond. I finally look up and realize I am now in trouble.

Best,

Wayne

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Before we leave the Tbilisi underground, here are two shots from one of the stations. My friend had to look out for guards because they don't permit photography (even though I didn't see any signs to that effect). Luckily I'm pretty quick with my tripod :D Both with the 40 Distagon on Ektar. And yes colour balancing is a b**ch sometimes hahahaha.


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3 hours ago, Mr.Prime said:

I found some more of those Rolleiflex 80mm/3.5 TLR 6 x 6 fujichrome scans from Alberta, here's one more:

 

 

 

Wow, gorgeous - congrats!

12 hours ago, Ouroboros said:

Giza #2

Leica MP

50mm elmar-m f2.8

Ektar

 

 

Love it, Steve.  Colors, grain, composition - all good, Mate.

17 hours ago, benqui said:

Tmax 400, M4, Apo 50, (X-Tol 1:1)

 

Love those soulful eyes, Marc 😍

17 hours ago, benqui said:

Would love to be there. In my hometown it is bloody cold now! Sell the photo to the Ministry of Tourism Adam!

Hey, I AM the Minister of Tourism! ;)

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Apparently I tried my hand at B&W 35mm film too. I'm pretty sure this is Ilford, just not sure if it's FP4 or PanF. This is graduation time at the Sheldonian in Oxford.

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"You talking' to me, tough guy?" 🕵️‍♂️

Portra 400

IIIg, 28mm summaron

 

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