Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Guest BigSplash

M8 Infra Red Issue

Recommended Posts

Guest BigSplash

Advertisement (gone after registration)

Below is a photo that I took with a 50mm Noctilux (f1) ...the BBQ coals look to be white hot but they actually were orange....

> Is this the famous IR issue that I am seeing?

 

> The lens did not have a UV IR filter because I so far have not loacted a 58mm UV IR filter..if anyone knows where I can get this device I'd appreciate.

 

> Can photoshop correct this type of flaw?

 

Thanks for any help

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cheaper digital cameras and camera phones have less effective filters and can "see" intense near-infrared, appearing as a bright purple-white color.

 

sic taken from Wikipedia. This about seems to cover your case.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Below is a photo that I took with a 50mm Noctilux (f1) ...the BBQ coals look to be white hot but they actually were orange....

> Is this the famous IR issue that I am seeing?

Yes, you are. The coals are radiating visible (yellow to red) light, but even more light in the near and far infrared range – in other words, they are red hot. The M8 is sensitive to light in the near infrared range of wavelengths, resulting in the purplish color. The coals are white only where infrared and visible light combined are bright enough to overexpose the sensor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Photoshop cannot correct this. You need to use the IR filter.

 

Do a search on here, and you will find thousands of threads relating to the IR problem. The correct filter solves the problem.

 

I wouldn't normally do this but none of our sponsors seem to stock them http://www.popflash.com/index.php?p=product&id=1918&parent=0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest BigSplash
Photoshop cannot correct this. You need to use the IR filter.

 

Do a search on here, and you will find thousands of threads relating to the IR problem. The correct filter solves the problem.

 

I wouldn't normally do this but none of our sponsors seem to stock them B+W 58MM UV/IR CUT

 

Many thanks to all of the above for their feedback.

 

Andy thanks ...I shall now go off and buy the filter........At 183€ and 116€ they are not cheap ! Thanks for pointing me in the right direction as I have looked on Google and not found the item.

 

regards

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest BigSplash

Advertisement (gone after registration)

Very interesting explanation, here's one I took a couple of years ago without the filter, always wondered what was going on here.

 

Brett here in the S.France they think of English cuisine as HP sauce, greasy chips, and mushy peas......I think your BBQ looks delicious! Lovely photo.

 

What lens did you use and what aperture ...Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brett here in the S.France they think of English cuisine as HP sauce, greasy chips, and mushy peas......I think your BBQ looks delicious! Lovely photo.

 

What lens did you use and what aperture ...Thanks!

 

Frank, thanks, it's a scene from Istanbul...! 75mm f2 M8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brett here in the S.France they think of English cuisine as HP sauce, greasy chips, and mushy peas......I think your BBQ looks delicious! Lovely photo.
I will dig around for a fun example of IR and the M8 and post here. But meanwhile I would like to object to the "English cuisine" categorisation. Properly cooked English food can be (and is) just as good as classical French cuisine - think roast beef, lamb, cod, pike, salmon, pies, puddings, dumplings/stew, stilton etc. This is basic rural kichen and is pretty much the same everywhere where the only key element is "properly cooked" and fresh ingredients. C'est tout. I have had plenty of gourmet friends visiting us that claimed to dislike English food & changed their mind. Making nouvelle cuisine like variations on UK food is easy enough - just reduce the size of the portions & add some decorative elements.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Properly cooked English food can be (and is) just as good as classical French cuisine - think roast beef, lamb, cod, pike, salmon, pies, puddings, dumplings/stew, stilton etc.

 

Pike?

 

Hands up if you've ever eaten pike

 

 

I've eaten all the rest, but never pike. I've never even seen it offered in a restaurant or market, either. Perhaps I go to all the wrong places

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest BigSplash
Photoshop cannot correct this. You need to use the IR filter.

 

Do a search on here, and you will find thousands of threads relating to the IR problem. The correct filter solves the problem.

 

I wouldn't normally do this but none of our sponsors seem to stock them B+W 58MM UV/IR CUT

 

I actually have a spare 55 and 60mm UV IR Leica Filter ....does anyone know where I can get a 58mm to 60mm (or 55mm if this is not losing anything) stepping adapter ring?

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pike?

 

Hands up if you've ever eaten pike

 

 

I've eaten all the rest, but never pike. I've never even seen it offered in a restaurant or market, either. Perhaps I go to all the wrong places

I recall eating pike in the Lake district once - but that was a long time ago. Not a common fish for cooking but it can be very good, pike-perch is also excellent or perhaps better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest BigSplash
I will dig around for a fun example of IR and the M8 and post here. But meanwhile I would like to object to the "English cuisine" categorisation. Properly cooked English food can be (and is) just as good as classical French cuisine - think roast beef, lamb, cod, pike, salmon, pies, puddings, dumplings/stew, stilton etc. This is basic rural kichen and is pretty much the same everywhere where the only key element is "properly cooked" and fresh ingredients. C'est tout. I have had plenty of gourmet friends visiting us that claimed to dislike English food & changed their mind. Making nouvelle cuisine like variations on UK food is easy enough - just reduce the size of the portions & add some decorative elements.

 

I never had any doubts about British cooking ...

> Think Beef Wellington (The French love it I believe, although probably do not appreciate the history behind this great dish)

> Think Roast Beef with its marble texture (not available in France at all)

> Think Welsh Lamb Chops....more fat on it for the BBQ compared to French cuts, and then add mint sauce.

 

Still the good news is that I have noticed that the French are starting to drive on the correct side of the road and are already half way through the conversion process.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pike?

 

Hands up if you've ever eaten pike

 

 

I've eaten all the rest, but never pike. I've never even seen it offered in a restaurant or market, either. Perhaps I go to all the wrong places

 

I've never encountered Pike on a menu either. However, there are a lot of pike recipes around. For example

Baked Pike With Mushroom Sauce Recipe | Food | Channel4.com

 

(I've known people to gnaw on the toothpick, but never to eat a whole Pike.

)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I actually have a spare 55 and 60mm UV IR Leica Filter ....does anyone know where I can get a 58mm to 60mm (or 55mm if this is not losing anything) stepping adapter ring?

Thanks

 

If you were to use a step-up/down, how would the lens hood fit? I don't own a Noctilux, so cannot tell from experience.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pike?

 

Hands up if you've ever eaten pike

 

I've eaten all the rest, but never pike. I've never even seen it offered in a restaurant or market, either. Perhaps I go to all the wrong places

 

Absolutely! But we caught it ourselves (Northern Michigan/Ontario area or out west). It's a great game fish, one of best as it fights hard and has very sharp teeth. It's tasty but full of bones, so wouldn't be a restaurant favorite. Too many customers would choke to death...giving the restaurant a bad rep and all.

 

Cheers, Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest BigSplash
If you were to use a step-up/down, how would the lens hood fit? I don't own a Noctilux, so cannot tell from experience.

 

I did not think of this....the answer is that it would not fit. I rarely use the lens hood however when using the Noctilux in low light conditions and I have not seen any reflected light issues as a result. Anyhow I guess I need to buy the 58mm filter at 115$ rather than an adapter which I guess would be 50$ if I can find one.

 

Andy the Noctiflex (and I have the old one) is an unbelievable lens to use with just a candle as lighting or some light source of that type....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Andy the Noctiflex (and I have the old one) is an unbelievable lens to use with just a candle as lighting or some light source of that type....

 

That bit I do know

I have used one a couple of times, but never felt the need to sell a kidney.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue., Read more about our Privacy Policy