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Leica Film Scanner – Would You Buy One?


redbaron

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Just on the off chance that the decision makers at Leica do read these threads, and presuming the results are positive, would you buy a film scanner that met Leica's standards?

 

Obviously it would have to be high-res, 16 bit, probably around 6400 dpi. Any other suggestions?

 

The manufacturing costs don't seem to be that high, but considering how Leica built the Pradovit, I would hope they would keep a lid on the price.

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Guest Bernd Banken
Just on the off chance that the decision makers at Leica do read these threads, and presuming the results are positive, would you buy a film scanner that met Leica's standards?

 

Obviously it would have to be high-res, 16 bit, probably around 6400 dpi. Any other suggestions?

 

The manufacturing costs don't seem to be that high, but considering how Leica built the Pradovit, I would hope they would keep a lid on the price.

 

Why you want to kick an open door?

 

An Imacon would be all you want to have. Regarding the price Leica would be the same or higher I guess.

But why they should attack a small market - much smaller than rangefindercameras and/or film based photography?

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I had the same idea and raist this question at the LUF Meeting last summer. Sadly it was declined.

 

Regards

Steve

 

I have heard about this statement as well. I hope they'll think twice about it. Leica's position is exactly at the interface between film and digital photography. So if there is a market for film scanners at all, it should be Leica who could cope for it. Perhaps they have to concentrate on the present products now and will think of it again later.

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I'm fully aware that Nikon has discontinued its range of quality scanners, but Imacon's range is just too expensive and aimed more at medium format, commercial use. Something like the top end Nikon scanners seem, to me, to actually be a better fit with Leica's product range and ethos than with Nikon's.

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I have heard about this statement as well. I hope they'll think twice about it. Leica's position is exactly at the interface between film and digital photography. So if there is a market for film scanners at all, it should be Leica who could cope for it. Perhaps they have to concentrate on the present products now and will think of it again later.

 

Actually I think the main problem with film and the highly desired hybrid work flow is to be solved by the film suppliers. High res/ high bit depth scanning is too expansive to keep film cameras competive or attractive for the end user if he is not a film enthusiast.

 

The film makers like Kodak and Fuji should develop processing and high res scanning machines which makes the hybrid workflow much more affordable for the end user.

 

Regards

Steve

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Guest Bernd Banken

Steve,

 

the (still) shrinking billions of paperprints for the global mass market is different from the few people who like filmphotography and don't like darkroom work for their fine art pics.

 

The pros in MF are already in the digital world, so MF scanners like Imacon or whatever names have to struggle as Leica has to do with their film cameras.

A slogan from Imacon is similar to "Scan your memories...." an evidence that no new pics are their target but the big amount of old existing chromes and negatives.

 

I think it would be very smart to invest in a 9000 from Nikon because the competitors like Epson flatbeds are not able to work nearly similar and Imacons are far away for us non pros and no other maker trusts the demand.

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(...)

The film makers like Kodak and Fuji should develop processing and high res scanning machines which makes the hybrid workflow much more affordable for the end user.

(...)

 

 

The Fuji minilab can develop and scan the images in one go.

 

The main challenge is typcially to convince the operator to use this feature, especially, if a higher resolution is requested. One of the reasons is the long scanning time for higher resolution (the workaround here is not to ask for an 1hr service but to give the operator time to do the job when the machine has no load). Some of them are concerned about changing the settings and not being able to set them back. Alway helpful to know a lab where the people really know their machines... ;)

 

Stefan

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Perhaps Nikon discontinued the scanners because they no longer sell well?

 

Oh, they are selling alright. That's not the problem.

 

Apparently Nikon does not want to pay for a rewrite of the software to make it work on new versions of OS X and maybe even Windoze.. I've heard the same story from two dealers.

 

I say they should bundle Vuescan or Silverfast with them be get over it.

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Oh, they are selling alright. That's not the problem.

 

Apparently Nikon does not want to pay for a rewrite of the software to make it work on new versions of OS X and maybe even Windoze.. I've heard the same story from two dealers.

 

I say they should bundle Vuescan or Silverfast with them and get on with it.

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