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Film and Maintaining in Your Freezer


holmes

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I think most of know that you can keep non exposed film for years in the freezer of your refrigerator. Have my freezer is filled with 35 and 120 canisters and rolls. I've been using some film from 2004 and the results are excellent for color, balance. All the things one would expect with a roll dated for 2010. I take advantage of sales, and buy by the 'brick'. I have ten rolls of Agfa's B&W slide film, ISO 200 along with ten processing mailer envelopes.Why haven't I shot it. Timing hasn't right. I don't have any Kodachrome so don't ask. I got fed up with their constant processing changes. Anyway for those who don't know, it's the freezer, not the refrigerator side.

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I have 2 shelves of my beer fridge devoted to films - now that is a SACRIFICE! My freezer is full of dead animal and my mothers cooking :-) so no room in there.

 

Hahahah =)

 

My fridge is loaded with film too.. but I never buy a whole stock of them so the inventory changes every couple of weeks

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The information used to be to only keep pro film in the freezer and over the counter film should be kept cool but not frozen. This, I believe has something to do the the aging of the celluloid which can become brittle on over the counter film which could also include film bought over the internet

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The information used to be to only keep pro film in the freezer and over the counter film should be kept cool but not frozen. This, I believe has something to do the the aging of the celluloid which can become brittle on over the counter film which could also include film bought over the internet

 

This reminds me of the miniDV 'wet' tape VS 'dry' tape debate. A lot of F.U.D. and very little concrete evidence. Longer term prospects I put in the freezer, short term use I keep in the fridge.

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I learned this technique for long term or short term storage of film; 35, 120 4x5 while attending a Federal Bureau of Investigation, FBI, photography class in advanced fingerprint techniques. Most of us were amazed at the expiration dates, some as old as 10 years. The chief of the photography department said that he had been there for some 25 plus years and remembered buying film years before. Even with DNA, fingerprints are still most reliable for identification. My "mentor" with the Bureau was head of the disaster response team for identification. He was in Jonestown, South America, 800 plus bloated corpses; he headed the team for the Waco Texas situation. He taught me all I know about the science of fingerprints. The two photographers in the photo section at Quantico taught me a lot about technical details in the science of photography. First you find or develop a fingerprint, then photograph it, then "lift" it. Of course shooting fingerprints you shoot 1:1. Crime scene photography is one of the most, if not, the most demanding. A great deal can rest on your photographs as they serve as a visual aid for the benefit of the jury and the prosecutors. It's like a wedding, a one time thing.

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