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Do you print your photographs?

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Guest WPalank

 

Can not figure out why nobody makes frames for 13x19 paper.

 

.

 

Bo,

 

Michael Reichmann swears by these guys (the Nielsen Frame) and you can have a 13 x 19 frame sent to doorstep in a multitude of styles and finishes for about $15. Looks like they have some sort of special with a free mattboard right now

 

He puts one of these things together in about a minute in the Luminous Landscape video series, "Camera to Print" in the Framing and Matteing tutorial.

Edited by WPalank

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I can't imagine not printing the best examples of my work. I have a website, I do digital books through Blurb.com, and I am just beginning to view my photographs at home using a new Sony LCD with a USB port that will allow me to show others what I've been producing. We are moving and I just don't have much storage or wall space, so I'll be interested in how the Sony does once I get it calibrated. I also am having a friend make a print from 27 .dng files stitched into one image using a Gigapan and their proprietary software--it's 708MB, and the print will be 24 x 88". I can't wait to see it. Judging from blowing it up on my NEC monitor, it should look terrific.

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It is the printing that is fun, just like taking the original photo. I've been printing for years, first in the darkroom then in digital with a succession of Epson and Canon printers. Finally ended up with an Epson 3800. Great printer combined with an ever increasing number of papers to explore and try out.

 

I've come to the conclusion that an M8 image, even with some cropping, can easily be printed to A2. But others (here) know that already!

 

Jeff

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I must be one of the few here that rarely prints - I've printed maybe ten photos out of the hundreds that I've taken. I regularly look at the photos on screen.... maybe I should print and frame a few.

 

This prompts me to add a bit to my earlier post. While I consider the print the ultimate result for me, I'm very selective about what I print. My LR catalog is full of "close but no cigar" images. This is no different than in my darkroom days, but the digital process is so much easier for me to get to the final "proof" stage.

 

Further, once I print, that doesn't translate necessarily into framing. I like to "live" with a print for awhile to see if it still resonates over time. And, to determine if I need to edit in any way. For this purpose, I choose a few prints at a time to tack on a wall board, or place on a shelf, over some period...generally weeks or more. Only after some deliberation do I determine if a print is "frame worthy," usually not for my wall, but for a gift to a friend or family member for whom the print also resonates. Many if not most don't pass my test.

 

I made prints for family members and friends over 20 years ago, still hanging somewhere in their (sometimes different) house. And, they remember the gift far longer than anything I might have bought.

 

Jeff

 

PS My new ambition is to create something in book form, but that's a whole different thing, requiring lots of thought around a coherent project.

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PS My new ambition is to create something in book form, but that's a whole different thing, requiring lots of thought around a coherent project.

 

Go for it Jeff, I did that last year, made a book of 32 pages, used a local printer, just gave it away to friends and family. I'm planning on doing the same this year, just dont expect to get the same standard of colour printing that one would expect from a modern multi-ink printer.

 

OK we can all look at stuff on the screen but I just enjoy looking at prints, particularly with other photographers. Sit down for the evening, glass of wine, nibbles, survey and critique each other's prints.

 

Jeff

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OK we can all look at stuff on the screen but I just enjoy looking at prints, particularly with other photographers. Sit down for the evening, glass of wine, nibbles, survey and critique each other's prints.Jeff

 

Good idea, and good test of friendship if the critiques are candid:)

 

Thanks, too, for the book encouragement.

 

Jeff

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I print quite frequently, mainly at A4 size. I also have a little portable Canon ES-1 printer, which is great for 6x4 prints. I take this with me when I am on holiday, or otherwise away from home, and use it a lot to make my own postcards, or to give promised prints to people that I meet. It also came in handy at a shop opening I was asked to cover a couple of years ago, as each guest was able to take home a photograph of themselves at the event.

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Our printer gets quite a lot of use with two of us printing work. I do love to print, but one thing that I admit to being VERY bad at is doing anything with the work once it is printed.

 

When I go to the local camera club, I'll make A3 prints and since we've had the 3800, we've made 1 A2 print, which I have to say looks bloomin' wonderful now that it has been professionally framed and mounted.

 

 

I tend not to be too adventurous with papers - when I find something I like, I tend to stick with it. Current favourites are Permajet oyster 271 and their fibre-based glossy paper, which is very nice indeed.

 

I must be more adventurous with papers!

 

Cheers

 

Mark

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Large prints? I go to a professional printer and we sit side by side to get it right.

 

First let me say, this is not a solicitation. I mostly only work with local (island) artists and photographers. This affords my clients the opportunity to pick papers and make final adjustments to their images on a large calibrated monitor and running numerous small proofs. Making a gallery or museum quality print becomes a collaborative effort when you work this way. You end up with a print that is exactly what you want.

 

But making prints this way is not cheap. We print at $22 to $25 per square foot and throw in the computer time. Other studios charge $100 to $250 for the computer time and print at $13 to $18 per square foot. Basically you'll end up paying the same unit price per print.

 

Most of my photographer clients have 13x19 or 17x22 printers themselves so they understand the process. And because we work by the square foot rather than by the hour, there is no time pressure. We can talk about techniques or art trends or framing concepts while the printers hum away. Its a rewarding way to make a living, BTW.

 

I'll have a photographer in later today to print three museum pieces. They will be about a meter square each. We'll also be doing a few gallery pieces at 40x60 inches tomorrow. Her bill will be about 10 to 15% of the final sales price. Framing and shipping will double that figure. She'll still pocket several thousand dollars when everything is said and done. And she'll have no waste, no studio overhead and no equipment payments. Having a pro print your big stuff is certainly an option to consider.

 

Again, this is not a solicitation. Rather it is a suggestion that you print your own small stuff and develop a relationship with a local printmaker who is willing to sit with you and provide the large prints your work deserves.

 

Tom

 

Kauai's Printmaker

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Guest WPalank

When it comes to displaying my true winners, I think that nothing beats having the print matted, glassed and framed to be displayed on the wall. However, as many have suggested, if you are unsure of which print is truly a winner or a down and dirty way to display your work in the office (for example), Scott Kelby touched on the issue with an inexpensive device he bought at IKEA which you can read about on his blog:

 

Photoshop Insider Blog By Scott Kelby

 

Scroll down to the middle of the page to Aug. 10 (the picture shows him holding what looks like a piece of rain gutter). Read that bit and then scroll up to Aug. 11, where he does an update to "How I Display My Prints".

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For me selecting those of my photos which I consider to be my best is one of the most important parts of the creative process, and making that choice is not always easy. But I'm not finished until I have printed, matted and framed a picture - usually on A2 Hahnemuehle Photo Rag 308 with an EPSON 4000. For me this is like reaping after all that work, and it's tremendous fun.

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Yes, it was my job/profession

I spent months researching various printers rips and paper

and ended up with the following

Using a v powerful mac, an Eizo ColorEdge CE240W monirtor

a graphiclite viewing booth

Photoshop CS4

an Epson 4800pro & 9800pro using epson pigment inks

Imageprint RIP

Kodak lustre paper

This set up was the only system that can print black and whites black and white

with no bronzing or metemarism (that 2 tone between black ink and white paper)

you cannot tell that it not a photographic print

the problem is it costs as much as the M8 and 3 lenses (leaving out the 9800)

 

happily do a test print for you

cheers Tony

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Tony, what advantage did the RIP give you on the 4800? I only ask because I have a 3800, which I believe uses a similar inkset, and get great neutral b&w prints. On the other hand I've had one paper - Harmen, can't remember which - that did give bronzing.

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an inexpensive device he bought at IKEA which you can read about on his blog:

 

Thanks, William...perfect timing! I was just in several stores last week looking for a better, but inexpensive, way to temporarily hang potential "winners" in a home space I'm dedicating as an extension to my "lightroom." I came up with several possible solutions, but this is definitely worth considering.

 

Jeff

 

PS I just moved from the Bay Area last year...sure miss the weather...but not the quakes and fires.

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Which professional photographer do you sit side by side with to get it right?

 

Jaap you are missing out big time.

 

Nice to talk about something other than the M9 isn't it?

 

Jeff

Not photographer - printer/profiler.

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Things may have changed over the last year or so, I could not get a perfect print using the epson inbuilt rip, it was not true to the photograph

The RIP is superb at printing tones in B&W

It's also incredible accurate and consistent

add the paper profile downloads from Imageprint, it's been brilliant

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I guess I am in the minority. (There are two of us so far.

) I don't print too many photos. "In the old days" when I shot film and had my own dark room I printed hundreds of black & white photos. Now that I have gone to digital I look at my photos on the computer . . . or display them on a digital picture frame.

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Since I am doing this for 45 years, I also view printing and display as the final outcome (and test) of my process.

 

I use Leica M8's, and Nikon D3x, D700 for different applications and venues.

 

My final prints for my home, office, and friends walls range from 10 X 15 in. to 24" X 80 (for panoramas ), the subject and composition will determine final print size and ratio.

 

I print ( using Qimage ) final display prints on an HP Z3100 with a small range of papers I have carefully profiled.

 

After preliminary selection and edit, I will print 4 X 6, and then 7 X 10 ' color proofs ' on a carefully profiled HP8250 using more pedestrian paper. These are close enough to the 'final' result that I then live with them, show them, and determine if I still think they are worth wall space. Most of these go into my albums but do not make it to wall display.

 

The above is what works or me. Others should of course do whatever works for them.

 

This subject has been fun.

 

Regards ... Harold

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