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egibaud

bye bye Love bye bye M8

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That is why I usually do not like to go to doctors for intense screening when I feel absolutely healthy. Sooner or later they will state that I am almost dead...

 

Regards

Steve

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Icannot get to the files any more on the link you sent,Nicole

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That is why I usually do not like to go to doctors for intense screening when I feel absolutely healthy. Sooner or later they will state that I am almost dead...

 

Regards

Steve

...

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Thanks everyone for the input. Since yesterday, I have gone back through every photograph taken with my M8, and one of the red dots first appeared in the first photograph that I took when the camera was returned from Solms after they had cured the green spots. (There are several red dots in total.) It's certainly something up with the sensor, as it's in exactly the same place in every photograph. The only time it's not visible is when the surrounding area is very bright. At first it only clearly showed at high ISO settings, which I tend not to use very much, but now it is more visible at lower settings too.

I agree that Aperture shows it more than other software, but one of the things that I like about Aperture is that it shows things as they are, and doesn't try to mask any blemishes unless you tell it to do such. Interestingly, viewing the photographs on the camera lcd shows these red dots very clearly too. A large part of my concern though, is that this is the second such fault in under 6 months. No other digital camera that I have previously owned, or those that I currently own, have ever displayed such faults. And if I have had two failures in this short time, how many more will I suffer in the future? This is what has ruined my faith in the camera. Still, lets see what Leica have to say. They haven't responded to my email yet.

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Nicole - who did you write to? STRONGLY recommend writing to Andrea.Frankl(at)leica-camera.com -- She's quick, effective and a very nice person to work with.

 

Also - do send a couple more of the problem images - it may be that Aperture is exaggerating something that's trivial?

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Since yesterday, I have gone back through every photograph taken with my M8, and one of the red dots first appeared in the first photograph that I took when the camera was returned from Solms after they had cured the green spots.

 

Nicole,

 

Were all the red dots there since day one, or is the number growing? If the number is the same, it's probably just Leica failing to update the camera's hot pixel map when they repaired it. Sloppy, if so. However, if the number of dots is increasing, it's probably a sick sensor. But either way, it would be a trip to Solms.

 

Sandy

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Reverting to the main topic of this thread, I have just been viewing online a set of some 250 photos taken at a party I attended recently in a dimly lit restaurant. They were shot on a Canon (I don't know which model but it was quite small) without flash and every one is well exposed and in sharp focus. There is no way similar results could have been obtained on an M8, yet this is precisely the type of candid photography that used to be synonymous with the Leica. Only a major improvement in noise levels at higher speeds can restore the M's supremacy in difficult conditions such as these.

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There is no way similar results could have been obtained on an M8, yet this is precisely the type of candid photography that used to be synonymous with the Leica. Only a major improvement in noise levels at higher speeds can restore the M's supremacy in difficult conditions such as these.

 

I think this is one of those arguments that is basically bollocks but has now become almost accepted as fact. On the basis that the M8 at, even ISO 1250, provides more basic resolution (dare I say quality?) than even half decent ISO 800 films, I'm not sure why it's now not possible to do stuff with the M8 that was once apparently possible with the film M cameras of old.

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I think this is one of those arguments that is basically bollocks but has now become almost accepted as fact. On the basis that the M8 at, even ISO 1250, provides more basic resolution (dare I say quality?) than even half decent ISO 800 films, I'm not sure why it's now not possible to do stuff with the M8 that was once apparently possible with the film M cameras of old.

 

This misses the point I was trying to make. Maybe the M8 at ISO 1250 does provide better quality than HPS at 1250 or even at 800 which enabled the film Leica with its fast lenses to produce acceptable results where few other film cameras could, but the bar has been raised. The comparison today is not with film but with other digital cameras.

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This misses the point I was trying to make. Maybe the M8 at ISO 1250 does provide better quality than HPS at 1250 or even at 800 which enabled the film Leica with its fast lenses to produce acceptable results where few other film cameras could, but the bar has been raised. The comparison today is not with film but with other digital cameras.

 

... Fine - and we make choices. An awful lot of the people on this forum make a living with their cameras and they have two or three different systems which they use according to their needs on a particular job. Professionally, I wouldn't dream of not having a modern DSLR + fast prime and zoom lenses AND having my M8 kit. But this doesn't invalidate the M8 as a system.

 

If you can only afford one camera system, Ms may not be right for you. If you love taking photographs under stones and in other gloomy places all the time, get a 5D mk2 or one of the super-duper Nikons... If you want a camera that can shoot frames with machine gun speed of people jumping over things or kicking balls or of eagles diving on innocent lambs, get a 1Dmk3 or equivalent. Fine. No argument.

 

However, SOME professionals have looked at the pros and cons and made the decision to base their whole practice round the M series - this is a choice for them that suits their style and their clients' needs. Others (and here I include myself) wouldn't want to depend on Ms only. Again, it's an informed choice - not a matter of theology!

 

Have fun taking photos...

Edited by chris_tribble

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...

IMHO, as long as your style of shooting does not rely on telephotos there is no reason why you can't shoot the same way with an SLR or RF...

..

,

 

Or zooms.

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Or zooms.

 

Or macros

 

Or shots closer than + - 1 meter

 

Or shots that truly "work the edges."

 

 

(none of which I do for weddings anyway LOL! ).

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I shoot a lot at night, mostly at ISO320 or 640 and then push a stop or two in post. Every time, I apply noise reduction to the files, I go back to the original file ion the end. I just saw Robert Frank's "The Americans" at an exhibition. Some of those prints are grainy as hell. Grainy and sharp. I love it. Long live the M8 and its CCD without Anti Alias Filter. Good luck with the 5DII. I'm sure that this camera is what you needed to make great photographs. In fact, everyone that shoots with the 5DII takes great photographs. Don't forget to ice your arm either when you get home. This forum of amateur photographers shooting with the M8 will miss all of you Canon and Nikon professionals.

 

I apologize for the sarcasm, but I used to shoot with a 5D, and I've used my friends' 5DIIs and D700s and I don't envy them at all. In fact if I did envy them, I would just buy one. I wonder if I would feel the urge to start a thread telling everyone how happy I am that I finally found the answer to my prayers and moved away from the M8. Sorry, I'm getting sarcastic again, but as a rule, why don't you guys just make these posts your first posts on the Canon forums instead of boring us amateurs over here.

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I shoot a lot at night, mostly at ISO320 or 640 and then push a stop or two in post. Every time, I apply noise reduction to the files, I go back to the original file ion the end. I just saw Robert Frank's "The Americans" at an exhibition. Some of those prints are grainy as hell. Grainy and sharp. I love it. Long live the M8 and its CCD without Anti Alias Filter. Good luck with the 5DII. I'm sure that this camera is what you needed to make great photographs. In fact, everyone that shoots with the 5DII takes great photographs. Don't forget to ice your arm either when you get home. This forum of amateur photographers shooting with the M8 will miss all of you Canon and Nikon professionals.

 

I apologize for the sarcasm, but I used to shoot with a 5D, and I've used my friends' 5DIIs and D700s and I don't envy them at all. In fact if I did envy them, I would just buy one. I wonder if I would feel the urge to start a thread telling everyone how happy I am that I finally found the answer to my prayers and moved away from the M8. Sorry, I'm getting sarcastic again, but as a rule, why don't you guys just make these posts your first posts on the Canon forums instead of boring us amateurs over here.

 

Many people talk but not everyone had the chance to try and do real work with different types of camera. I have.

The perfect tool does NOT exist. This means having several tools to cover all needs or have the most versatil tool. I've made 60.000 pics with my 2 M8 bodies... and about 8.000 with the 5D MKII, I think I have enough material and lived enough situations to be able to compare.

 

I am likely to keep one M8 body + Noctilux and Elmarit 28 but I do not think I'll use it as my reliable tool in action shooting when focusing is key if I want my client to pay for the job. For outdoor jobs, no rush, or possibility to do hyperfocal, then I'll use the M8 I keep.

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Have the best of all world. I would keep my M8, sell off my film based M7, and buy more lenses for my Canon 5D MkII.

 

If M9 comes, then I'll sell my M8 and get it.

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I'm sorry I was so harsh, but I've had a cup of coffee in the meantime. I think it is a good decision to hang on to your M8 and at least some lenses, or maybe sell it and buy an M6 for your own photography and travel instead. I also use different camera systems in certain situations, but I would definitely miss the M-system if I got rid of it.

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Nicole - if this is a 'hot' or stuck pixel, then you can always try downloading a trial version of Iridient's Raw Developer. There is a panel in that application that enables hot-pixel mapping. I don't know how good the function is, because so far (knock on wood) I've had no such problems.

 

The general interface for the application is a little confusing, but I believe Raw Developer is the best raw application for the M8, and only neglected because it is not from a mainstream developer (imho).

 

The function is very good for hot pixels and its adjustable. My current M8 has a single half height of pixels column gone red at ISO 1250, its not visible after the function is applied.

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The ideal camera for me would be:

 

Any compact with a zoom 28 - 120 openning at 1.4 and little noise at 6400 ISO - no lense so swop, no sensor to clean, to weight to carry....

 

One thing I can say is that if people worked with fix focal lense on a reflex I think their picture would have more of an M style. Zoom is surely the best way of becoming lazy. Aside the difference in quality.

 

I can tell you that it is very hard to part with your favorite camera, it's like splitting up with your girlfriend just because you did not meet her in the right place and at right moment. You love her but you know it is just not possibe. Keeping her as an occasional lover is the only option... I'll do this with one of my M8

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Many people talk but not everyone had the chance to try and do real work with different types of camera. I have.

The perfect tool does NOT exist. This means having several tools to cover all needs or have the most versatil tool. I've made 60.000 pics with my 2 M8 bodies... and about 8.000 with the 5D MKII, I think I have enough material and lived enough situations to be able to compare.

 

I am likely to keep one M8 body + Noctilux and Elmarit 28 but I do not think I'll use it as my reliable tool in action shooting when focusing is key if I want my client to pay for the job. For outdoor jobs, no rush, or possibility to do hyperfocal, then I'll use the M8 I keep.

 

Would not dissuade you and I believe that once you have work with your tools long enough, your instincts will tell you what the right tool is for you. I work either with just RF or SLR rather than a combination for the same reasons of consistent look.

 

I feel that capturing the moments is more important than the image quality and since getting the M8, its been a struggle. There have been shots I know I would have gotten only with a RF or vice versa. Again no perfect tool but I am glad to have the M8 in my tool kit.

 

Canon's AF(just some personal idiosyncrasies and thoughts):

 

1. I feel the 1D series are much superior to the 5DII especially in low light but give the AF time to get it right.

2. L primes are more robust than the zooms. Give the lens a shake close to your ears, if they rattle, they are going to have decentering issues.

3. Send in your lenses for AF calibration(factory standard as you have 2 bodies) at least 2 to 4 times a year.

4. If you are a heavy user. Replace your lenses every 4 - 6 years. The AF mechanism wears out pretty fast.

5. Use the USM feature to crank the AF out of focus and let the AF snap to focus. Its usually pretty good.

6. For a ID get the Es-c focusing screen for manual focusing (I think I got that right, I hope!)

 

 

Other than that I think Canon's AF is pretty accurate 95% of the time.

 

Flare and veiling glare will be worse from Canon lenses than the CV, Leica and Zeiss M lenses. You may not want to give that up.

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Or macros

 

Or shots closer than + - 1 meter

 

Or shots that truly "work the edges."

 

 

(none of which I do for weddings anyway LOL! ).

 

Aye, that's true. ...but what do you mean by "work the edges"?

 

btw how did the Pocket Wizards turn out. Its become academic for me, I have 4 MultiMax and 2 Plus but my governent's banned their sales.

 

Love to do weddings but its too taxing for me. Usually for us(Singaporean Chinese, anyway) a wedding lasts 14 - 18 hours.

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