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davidada

30 x 40 inch M8 Prints

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True, seeing the prints would be preferable but seeing the enlarged results by someone skilled with post processing is also a good point of departure. The couple of RAW example files I have downloaded previously were definitely not anything I would consider usable for prints larger than 11x17, so I am assuming people have found a much more effective working method to eek out 30x40+ prints.

 

Totally not trying to be hyper-critical here or cry foul, I am genuinely interested to hear and see how other artists are using the M8.

 

Best, Jamie

 

JAMIE DROUIN | PHOTOGRAPHS

 

Jamie, I regularly make 24 x 36 " prints on my HPz3100 and they are pretty damned good BUT there are some tips when working from RAW and they are, very briefly:

 

* Use Capture 1 to decode the M8 RAW file and when you've done with basic tweaks export to 16 bit TIFF.

* Make sure the capture is perfect (i.e. the best glass and a tripod if the shutter is slower than 1/500th

* Upres in Photoshop Bicubic Smoother (yup I know about Genuine Fractals and so on) and only ever upres in one swoop and by 200 or 400%

 

This gives the best results and I have tried most everything. For more detail, Reichmann's 'From Camera to Print' video series at Luminous Landscape is really useful though these days I tend to leave my output sharpening and upres to Lightroom's print module unless I want the very finest results. It's just a bummer that LR doesn't soft proof.

 

t

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.......I am on the fence about the M8 or a 6x7 to augment my 4x5 work, which reason would normally dictate the 6x7, but this thread has made an interesting argument for the M8....

 

Jamie - First; I enjoyed [particularly] your Iceland work.

 

This thread keeps reappearing for good reasons, not the least of which is that the original poster David Adamson is highly respected as a printmaker. My background as an artist photographer is in almost exclusive use of 6x9 view-camera, and 6x7 and 6x9 rangefinder cameras. For what it is worth, after observing this forum for a long while, it was this thread more than any other which convinced me to downsize from my 6x7 rangefinder cameras to the M8 and I have never regretted the decision. I also mostly use the M8 in a similar way to how I shot film; with a tripod, but with chimping to determine final framing. I keep the picture count down by deleting fairly ruthlessly.

 

No one can make your decision for you [particularly as second hand Mamiya 6x7 cameras are a bargain] but I can see a view-camera/M8 combination as extremely workable companion tools. Sean Reid's suggestion to visit David Adamson is a good one if it is possible. Check out David's credentials, and while you are about it, I'd recommend a subscription to Sean's highly informative site where you will find many answers to questions about the M8, and the 'M' platform - it could also save you some money in the lens department.

 

Good luck with your decision.

 

............... Chris

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Guest bwcolor

I am somewhat restored to faith in humankind when I see that some intelligent members of this forum stand up to the nattering nabobs of negativity who write their stupid ill informed critical wise crack comments for publication here. The photographer/technician who published the first entry in this string is clearly qualified to state his opinion, and had no intention I'm sure of trying to prove his point with the publication of the web illustration. I am grateful for his time in publishing and in having the benefit of his great experience as a printer and photographer.

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If I may add something to this very useful thread, I would highly recommend the Qimage software for big prints. I use it each time I print bigger than A3 (up to A2) and the results are amazing.

 

There was a very interesting discussion on this software (which is by the way a bargain) :

 

http://www.l-camera-forum.com/leica-forum/leica-m8-forum/64881-your-workflow-large-m8-prints.html

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First, thank you for the replies and suggestions. Although I am new as an active poster to this forum I have spent enough time here to know that it is comprised of a large number of true professionals with hands on knowledge of what they write. I especially appreciate that no one responded with "Troll!" as can happen on so many other forums when a newbee posts such a leading question ;-)

 

To give a bit more background, I am no stranger to the M-series, having used an M6 almost exclusively for 16 years for my exhibition work (including exhibits at the Leica gallleries, etc), before shifting to large format.

 

It seems that my next step is to see some actual M8 prints in person. Anyone in the Vancouver/Victoria/Seattle area?

 

Best regards,

Jamie

 

JAMIE DROUIN | PHOTOGRAPHS

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If I may add something to this very useful thread, I would highly recommend the Qimage software for big prints. I use it each time I print bigger than A3 (up to A2) and the results are amazing.

 

There was a very interesting discussion on this software (which is by the way a bargain) :

 

http://www.l-camera-forum.com/leica-forum/leica-m8-forum/64881-your-workflow-large-m8-prints.html

 

I also highly recommend Qimage. I automatically uprezzes (or downrezzes) to the target print size and gives excellent control over print layout. I use it for large prints on an HP Z3100 (24"), and for small prints on whatever comes to hand (usually an HP 8250 '02' system ).

 

It unfortunately is Windows only, so is the last piece of software I am running on a parallels VM system on my macpro. It is the only piece of windows software for which I have not found an acceptable native Apple alternative.

 

I regularly print 24 X 36 from digital images (mostly D3X), and have printed excellent 16 X 24 from M8. The reason for not going larger was not technical, the subject and compositions simply did not ask for larger prints.

 

Stitched panos have been much larger.

 

As an aside, it is easy to be negative and critical, but I for one greatly appreciate the efforts made by various obviously expert posters on this forum to spend their time sharing their experience and knowledge with us.

 

I echo the comments of several others here and request that the constructive contributors continue to do so and neither be discouraged by some of the negativity, or fall into the trap of 'taking the bait'.

 

Regards ... Harold

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according to Ilford printing technician, any images from 3 megapixels CCD camera is good enough for super large print. I did print A3+ paper from sony 2 mega camera and it looks ok.

But not looking at them very close though.

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according to Ilford printing technician, any images from 3 megapixels CCD camera is good enough for super large print.

But not looking at them very close though.

 

That is my experience.

 

Three MP is fine for 40 inch or larger prints, 5 MP is excellent.

 

A very small number of subjects require more. Also, photographers whose stock in trade is large prints with insane detail need more as well.

 

But, one advantage of oodles of MP is the ability to crop heavily and still make a large print.

 

Horses for courses.

 

Best,

 

Bill

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People tend to forget that in the film era a photographer would grab a medium format camera if he had to produce an A3 or larger print.

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+1 to that.

Even a few would reach for a 4x5 to fill that beautiful print hunger.

(Not that I know a thing about that, nothing, so what if I have a busch pressman, are you implying something?)

People tend to forget that in the film era a photographer would grab a medium format camera if he had to produce an A3 or larger print.

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People tend to forget that in the film era a photographer would grab a medium format camera if he had to produce an A3 or larger print.

 

I've seen Salgado prints much larger than that shot on 35mm Tri-X. They looked superb. A3 is what, roughly equivalent to a 20 x 16 print?

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A3 is what, roughly equivalent to a 20" × 16" print?

A3 is 1/8th of a square meter and has an aspect ratio of 1:1.41. So it's approx. 11.5 × 16.5 inches (29.7 × 42 cm).

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