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Single exposure devices from 1936 :

OLIGO with large shutter Ibsor and nickel Elmar,

OLEYO with small shutter Ibsor and nickel Elmar ,

 

After focus was done on the rear focusing glass, this one was removed and replaced by the film loaded plate.

Note different fixing and form for single exposure plates siding.

 

Were both used for passport type pictures or for testing film.

 

OLIGO-OLEYO.jpg

Edited by jc_braconi
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JC,

 

These are great. I've seen photos of them before but never in such detail. I never knew how they worked but your photos with the focusing glass and film holder with dark slide makes everything clear. It is such a pleasure to see all your old gear in a condition in which it was made. Thanks for sharing your wonderful collection with us.

 

Len

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I let the shutters on pose T for showing the lens.

 

This little attention to the small details is why your equipment is in such perfect condition. I always thought that because of your age you had an "in" with Mr. Barnack. :)

 

Len

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I do not understand, why this construction was thought necessary. You could make test and single photos with a normal camera. Barnack's first 35-mm construction was said to be used for testing films - and it gave him the chance to make "real" photos as well. So what was the reason for this special construction with all its limitations?

 

Though my question should not be misunderstood that i don't like seeing these pictures. It's mere interest, that I am asking.

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OK

Imagine you are a photographer in the 30's and one people want 4 pictures for asking a passport the same day. If you have a Leica camera you need to load a film in it and next you take only one picture, next to the dark room to do the wet job next you need to print by contact the 4 pictures.

I think you need a certain lenght of film to use a camera, with this single exposure you can load a lot of cassetes with one frame part of film in them, next you use them when you need them and you do not waste film time and money.

 

Hoping this help to understand.

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  • 3 months later...
I do not understand, why this construction was thought necessary. You could make test and single photos with a normal camera. Barnack's first 35-mm construction was said to be used for testing films - and it gave him the chance to make "real" photos as well. So what was the reason for this special construction with all its limitations?

 

Though my question should not be misunderstood that i don't like seeing these pictures. It's mere interest, that I am asking.

 

I'm trying to remember off the top of my head, but... I'm fairly sure that in my 1938 copy of 'The Leica Manual' it mentions the use of these devices for photomicrography (using a microscope in connection with a camera to make images). I'll check it out when I get a chance and make sure I've remembered it correctly!!

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