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jc_braconi

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Leica IIIa ,in black paint, 1935 issued with nickel Elmar 3.5/50 and black FISON and with SCNOO rapid winder on top of a FIAKU ball & sockets head.

In chrome, 1936 issued, with chrome Elmar 3.5/50 + G type Yellow n° 1 FIRHE filter and chrome FISON and with MOOLY motor with release linkage.

This IIIa is my very first Leica screw mount, bought in the 60’ies,.

Catalogs from the 30’ies dealing with the IIIa and SCNOO rapid winder.

 

/applications/core/interface/imageproxy/imageproxy.php?img=http://perso.orange.fr/br.collection/leica/images/IIIa.jpg&key=323457494869eb0e765dbadee651a71ab77a5af184d07ba81928ee889572d7ca"> Edited by jc_braconi

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JC; that IIIa in black paint from 1935 is a real beauty and rare! Thank you again for sharing; its a shame that we don't have more users looking and commenting on this opportunity to see such marvels!

 

Best regards

 

Alan

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JC, we suspect that there will be some suitable retribution in your afterlife for this. Maybe you will be set to collect Miranda cameras. Or Edixas ...

 

The old man from the Age of the Leica Scew Mount

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Thank you again for sharing; its a shame that we don't have more users looking and commenting on this opportunity to see such marvels!

Best regards

Alan

 

What can we do ?

anyway I will follow to play with this items in the next days.

 

Thank you Gents for your kind comments.

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[both the SCNOO and MOOLY look like quite the mechanical marvels. I assume the motor is spring operated?

The MOOLY works like a clock, it operates for 12 views when full loaded.

you use the front lever for activate it.

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JC, we suspect that there will be some suitable retribution in your afterlife for this. Maybe you will be set to collect Miranda cameras. Or Edixas ...

 

Why me Lord ?

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Here we have a selection of rangefinders; from the early FODUA to latest FOKOS, with two examples of the early FONOR and a FOKIN. Taken on a London price list from 1935 showing the most expensive to be the FOKIN at £3.12shillings (average wage of a manual worker was around £2 per week!).

 

There are many variations of engraving and marking, too many to include from my collection in the picture.

 

Regards

 

Alan

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too many to include from my collection in the picture.

Regards, Alan

No kidding ?

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No kidding! What a thought! Especially on the FODUA, I sometimes wonder how many variations of engraving there are between those in feet and meters, I think at last count I had ten completely diferent! One could make a study of this alone, maybe I will live long enough to become a bore on the subject; most probably that already; collecting becomes very addictive!!

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No kidding! What a thought! Especially on the FODUA, I sometimes wonder how many variations of engraving there are between those in feet and meters, I think at last count I had ten completely diferent! One could make a study of this alone, maybe I will live long enough to become a bore on the subject; most probably that already; collecting becomes very addictive!!

Sometimes I think that People at Leitz had a meeting every morning and said :" what are we making different today ?"

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The MOOLY works like a clock, it operates for 12 views when full loaded.

you use the front lever for activate it.

 

That is quite the marvel they made with a few springs and sprockets

Those days they need batteries and electronics for it. Do you use the front lever to advance the frame after you take the exposure or dose it both ( take the picture and advance the film) I assume it will have a dial at the bottom for winding up the clockwork.

 

 

 

Here we have a selection of rangefinders; from the early FODUA to latest FOKOS, with two examples of the early FONOR and a FOKIN. Taken on a London price list from 1935 showing the most expensive to be the FOKIN at £3.12shillings (average wage of a manual worker was around £2 per week!).

 

There are many variations of engraving and marking, too many to include from my collection in the picture.

 

Regards

 

Alan

 

That is quite the collection Alan, thank you for showing. I sure like to see those things. Wonder if I am in danger of a new addiction

Peter

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That is quite the marvel they made with a few springs and sprockets Those days they need batteries and electronics for it. Do you use the front lever to advance the frame after you take the exposure or dose it both ( take the picture and advance the film) I assume it will have a dial at the bottom for winding up the clockwork.

 

It takes pictures and advance film as long as you keep pushed the front lever for 12 frame (3x12 = 36)

It is build as a clock machinery with a large folding key as on an alarm clock on the bottom.

If you have the first book from G. Rogliatti you can see on page 108 some picts about a MOOLYopen.

 

Thank you Gents for your comments.

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That is quite the marvel they made with a few springs and sprockets Those days they need batteries and electronics for it. Do you use the front lever to advance the frame after you take the exposure or dose it both ( take the picture and advance the film) I assume it will have a dial at the bottom for winding up the clockwork.

 

It takes pictures and advance film as long as you keep pushed the front lever for 12 frame (3x12 = 36)

It is build as a clock machinery with a large folding key as on an alarm clock on the bottom.

If you have the first book from G. Rogliatti you can see on page 108 some picts about a MOOLYopen.

 

Thank you Gents for your comments.

 

JC,

That is a pretty modern concept as far as I am concerned, to bad they don't build them anymore.

It mast be quite the marvel of fine mechanic. Sorry to say I don't have any books on the subject. I don't think you can call me a collector...maybe a pack rat since I collect anything tool that is useful or could be useful. Seeing all those pictures .... it is very tempting to search for some old goodies.

Peter

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