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Digilux 2 Spot-meter, Shifting program, picture properties


ralfyb
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So reading the manual I just can´t grab the following:

 

Spot-meter with the function button changes the the green rectangle to small and shows a little cross.

Spotmeter with the selector ring cross with large green rectangle.

 

What is the difference?

 

When are the different modes most efficient?

 

Who uses spot, multi-level etc. for which effects?

 

Does anyone use shifting program and picture properties?

 

Thank you!!!!

Ralf

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Hi Ralf :)

I hope you enjoy using your digilux 2- one look around here of late and you will find plenty of praise for them!

 

I usually use mine in the multi level mode (circle with a dot inside) for 'regular' lighting conditions. It gives a good average level under most circumstances.

 

If I'm trying something cute or using flash I always flick over to spot metering (just the dot) for a bit more accuracy. The metering area is represented by the blue cross in the viewfinder.

 

I rarely, if ever, use the third mode (circle sans dot).

 

Enjoy, I look forward to seeing some photos!

 

Sam

 

edit: just re-read your post and realised I didn't say anything about program shifting! If you're using the camera in automatic mode, it can be useful to achieve lighting and DOF effects that you might desire.

 

What do you mean by picture properties?

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The spot-meter can be interesting to use as the light-meter measures only the light reflecting from where the spot is directed.

 

Light-meters in cameras are set to measure the reflecting light from a middle-gray surface, so if you point the camera to an area of middle gray (or middle contrast of some sort) you will get the correct lighting very precise (equal to measuring the light with an external lightmeter). You can "read the light" that way, by pointing the spot to a middle-gray area, then lock that reading by pressing the shutter half down, reframe to your shot, then press the shutter down fully.

 

Using the spot will learn one quite a bit about light. And you can increace/decrase the light by moving the spot to a slightly lighter or darker spot, then lock that and you have a modified shot. Try it.

 

But for most stuff, the multi-level setting is the best setting. Very precise, actually.

 

The full-frame metering I newer saw, and don't see, no point in using.

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Too add one caution to Thorsten's spot metering method.... IF you are using Auto focus, when you do take a reading whilst holding the shutter half way down to "lock" it in, MAKE SURE you are on the same plane as where you wish to focus as well. Pressing the shutter half way down not only locks the exposure in, but also the focus.

 

As everyone will tell you, though... with the ease of adjusting your settings on this camera, you can take the reading as Thorsten suggests, but then use it as a starting point and try a frame over and one under. While metering is accurate, it should only be a suggested starting point for how YOU want to interpret the scene. Often, exposing for highlights or exposing for shadows can have a dramatic effect on the impact and style of the photo.

 

This camera's analog controls are precisely what makes it a wonderful camera to shoot with.

 

JT

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Perfectly true, John.

 

Using the spot-meter I usually suggest to people who own a point and shoot camera where they can't easily adjust the exposure. But using the spot and pointing it different places, they can suddenly use the automatic of the camera in a way so they can control things.

 

For the Digilux 2 it's NATURAL to go manual, and this quote from my leica.overgaard.dk - Thorsten Overgaard's Leica Sites - Leica Digilux 2 sample photos and tests (as well as Panasonic DMC-LC1) page might apply:

 

Manual exposure

I often use external lightmeter because it's more precise. But often I use the Digilux 2's lightmeter, and mostly on center-focused meetering. What I do is that I shoot or measure a scene with the camera's lightmeter, then adjust the f-stop and the exposure time (and thus going manual). And I often shoot series of three exposures on a middle exposure (say f/2, 1/250 sec), then do another series on f/2, 1/125 sec, and another on f/2 1/500. Sometimes even one or two more series at f/2 1/60 sec and f/2, 1/30 if I feel it's an important shot and there might be someting interesting effect in doing so. As the Digilux 2 has great JPG's but only that (not RAW where you have lots of information and data you can alter after the fact), I tend to shoot many so that I have something final I don't need to fix in Photoshop.

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Perfectly true, John.

 

Using the spot-meter I usually suggest to people who own a point and shoot camera where they can't easily adjust the exposure. But using the spot and pointing it different places, they can suddenly use the automatic of the camera in a way so they can control things.

 

For the Digilux 2 it's NATURAL to go manual, and this quote from my leica.overgaard.dk - Thorsten Overgaard's Leica Sites - Leica Digilux 2 sample photos and tests (as well as Panasonic DMC-LC1) page might apply:

 

Manual exposure

I often use external lightmeter because it's more precise. But often I use the Digilux 2's lightmeter, and mostly on center-focused meetering. What I do is that I shoot or measure a scene with the camera's lightmeter, then adjust the f-stop and the exposure time (and thus going manual). And I often shoot series of three exposures on a middle exposure (say f/2, 1/250 sec), then do another series on f/2, 1/125 sec, and another on f/2 1/500. Sometimes even one or two more series at f/2 1/60 sec and f/2, 1/30 if I feel it's an important shot and there might be someting interesting effect in doing so. As the Digilux 2 has great JPG's but only that (not RAW where you have lots of information and data you can alter after the fact), I tend to shoot many so that I have something final I don't need to fix in Photoshop.

 

 

And it is because of this YOU, my friend, are the GURU of all things Digilux 2. You wrote the book... I only read it. :)

 

JT

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Thorsten, these pictures are truly stunning. The one of Maybritt leaning on her hand is so captivating that I had to look at it several times.

 

And the use of the second shutter in the picture of the car on the street is also arresting. It makes you look twice.

 

Man, you have fun.

 

Now I have to go back to school! :(

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The one of Maybritt leaning on her hand is so captivating that I had to look at it several times.(

 

That photo caused two reactions in my world. First was "who is this guy?" And second... "he's shooting with what?"

 

Honestly, I stumbled across Thorsten's site via a link here on the L-Camera forum. I was in awe of the natural color, sharpness and overall feel of the images. I sent another friend to look with the statement, " I can't put my finger on it, but this guy's photos are so 'real' and natural." I was taken by the lack of what I call the photographer's fingerprints. Each image was clean, clear and completely unforced. No where does he impose himself or the camera into his photos.

 

It was only later, after I had become disappointed in the Digilux 3, that I learned that a lot of what I liked at Thorsten's site had actually been taken with the Digilux 2. It was then, I had to have one..... or two or three.

 

I've bought several Digiux 2s but have yet to find one that shoots pictures that captivate like Thorsten's. The shot(s) of Maibritt are stunning... especially the portrait series for her Facebook page.

 

I only hope Maibritt had the good sense to send him a big FAT INVOICE for her modeling fee. LOL

 

Seriously, though... my apologies for "gushing".... but what I wrote here is a genuine experience (ain't the Internet grand?) and resulted in a very nice relationship with Thorsten. He's the real deal and very willing to share.

 

JT

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I don't usually follow links off the forum, but I'm glad I did this time! Great thanks to John and Bill for expressing their admiration.

 

Magnificent images, Thorsten.

 

Maybe it's not so far from Texas to Denmark for your next seminar. ;)

 

I've bought several Digiux 2s but have yet to find one that shoots pictures that captivate like Thorsten's. ...

 

"Aye, there's the rub," as Hamlet, Prince of Thorsten's Denmark said. It's appalling how bad my images look compared to those of a master. :o

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This camera's analog controls are precisely what makes it a wonderful camera to shoot with.

JT

 

John, you say on your "Tools, Toys and Treasures" page (nice site, BTW) that

 

> A second Digilux 2 is on the way. I will use one agressively, but

> the other is off to be tricked out with some custom features and

> will probably become my Sunday driver.

 

What custom features? Where are you getting them?

 

Thanks,

John

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John, you say on your "Tools, Toys and Treasures" page (nice site, BTW) that

 

> A second Digilux 2 is on the way. I will use one agressively, but

> the other is off to be tricked out with some custom features and

> will probably become my Sunday driver.

 

What custom features? Where are you getting them?

 

Thanks,

John

 

 

LOL - boy the Internet sure dates itself in a hurry. :)

 

The tricks are purely cosmetic. And, I'm now up to three Digilux 2s and one Panasonic DMC LC1. Two of the Digilux 2s are out for the cosmetic upgrades. I hope to have them back shortly.

 

Fortunately, after a bit of shopping and swapping, I'm pleased to say all three Digilux 2s are probably as "new" as you can find. The only signs of use are typical tri-pod mount scuffs on the bottom. Otherwise all three are pristine. The DMC LC1 had some tiny nicks that I was able to buff out for the most part and touch up with a little India ink. Barely noticeable.

 

Anyway... the two "tricked-out" versions involve Luigi, Camera Leather and M Classics. Probably a bit "metro-sexual" :D for some... but I'll post photos upon completion.

 

JT

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