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plexi

M8.2

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Oops. Just noticed that the last of the listed "Key Features" of the D3 on Nikon's US web site (D3 from Nikon) is:

 

"Comprehensive state-of-the-art dust and moisture countermeasures and electromagnetic interference."

 

As it's worded, then, the D3 offers both

"Comprehensive state-of-the-art dust and moisture countermeasures" and

"(comprehensive? state-of-the-art?) electromagnetic interference."

 

For security's sake, why don't all D3 owners turn on their cameras at the same time that the Cern LHSC is turned on, to protect us from the black holes?

 

 

But conceptually, Nikon's grammatical gaffe is nowhere near as bad (nor is their advertising as pompous) as Canon's non-sequitur "Destined EVOLUTION" at EVOLUTION, since whoever destines evolution must be God.

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Mark--

Your recommendation to consider AF settings is good. That's why I said above that the D200's response "depend on camera settings,"

 

If the camera is set to fire only when in focus and a lens passes through proper focus in its AF hunt at turn-on, then the camera doesn't fire at all.

 

But if the camera went to sleep with approximately the same focus it finds when it is awakened, then it wakes and fires immediately.

 

Compare that to the M8. Whether it's still in focus or not, it still waits nearly a second before firing.

 

There are so many AF possibilities in dSLRs that I simply took as an example my own general usage of the camera.

 

Similarly, if I'm awaiting a specific event but don't know when it will occur, I will have prefocused the M8's lens--and will then be nonplussed when I press the release but the camera delays and doesn't fire in time.

 

 

It's interesting again at this level to find such a behavioral difference between CCD and CMOS, though I'm finding the behavior of the D200 similar to what you say of the D3.

 

What do you think, possibly due also to the simpler component design of the M8 as compared to the ASICs and specialized processor of the D3?

Howard, if you are awaiting a specific event, would it not be a good idea to leave the camera switched on?

Leica thoughtfully provides a menu item where one can specify the time before the camera goes into standby....

 

As long as you leave the LCD off the amount of power consumed is minimal.

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Readiness, I think, is a matter of habit and shooting rhythm.

 

Whenever I use Digilux 2, I always press the button a little prior to any possible event, so that the camera is ready. That includes when walking in a door, walking out on the street, etc. I make sure my camera is "ready" which includes awake, on Auto shutter time and either Auto aperture (if outdoor) or f/2 if lowlight.

(And for the Digilux 2 AF, which IS slow, I have developed a rhythm of focusing and then shooting that means no delay).

 

Same goes for the DMR which I have set for going to sleep after 15 minutes. So I know when to wake up the camera. I don't expect it to be ready unless it's "on." And my cameras aperture, time, auto/manual is always set to be ready for what I could expect of possibilities.

 

So IMHO it's not an item how fast a camera is. Other qualities in a camera count. You work with the tool you have.

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Howard, if you are awaiting a specific event, would it not be a good idea to leave the camera switched on?

Leica thoughtfully provides a menu item where one can specify the time before the camera goes into standby....

 

As long as you leave the LCD off the amount of power consumed is minimal.

 

When I know I am going to be taking fast moving events, I turn the auto power off to 'off' in the menu. The only thing is to remember to reset it to the usual (2, 5 or 10 minutes) after you have finished, or you will get a flat battery (guilty as charged).

 

Wilson

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When I know I am going to be taking fast moving events, I turn the auto power off to 'off' in the menu. The only thing is to remember to reset it to the usual (2, 5 or 10 minutes) after you have finished, or you will get a flat battery (guilty as DIScharged).

 

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Cologne, 8.09.2010

 

PHOTOKINA 2010

 

" iLEICA"-- A revolution in image acquisition announced!

 

Apple, the new owner of once famous German camera manufacturer brand "Leica", just showed another revolutionary device at this year's world's biggest photofest, Photokina.

"iLeicaTen System" is truly a breakthrough image acqusition device, a cross between a photo and film camera that is bound to revolutionize the whole industry, just like the iPod did in the area of experiencing recorded music.

iLeica consists of three elements that together make acquiring moving or static pictures a wholly new experience. The heart of the system is iPodTen, the latest entertainment supercomputer with a new touch sensitive 5 inch OLED screen and not much else on the outside. The screen can also be beamed directly to the eye's retina via iScreen, a retinal scanner/projector. The projector the size of a fingernail, attaches easily to one's glasses to project directly into the eye a virtual screen looking like a 60inch HD display hanging in the air some 6 feet before the viewer. The third and indispensible element of the system is the actual iLeicaTen, matchbox size lens and sensor in one, which sends the pictures wirelessly to the iPod, operated by the other hand or the eye movements. The sensor being a 60 megapixel (3x20MP) superFoveon, offers unmatched quality both in photocamera and movies mode. The noisefree sensitivity extends all the way to that of a naked eye-- a candle is enough to light a fairly large room for those late night romantic sessions.

What is left from Leica, the original German photo equipment manufacturer's expertise, actually resides in front of the sensor: the 14x exquisite optical zoom. This part is manufactured for Apple by Panasonic which bought the optical part of the bankrupt German engineering icon.

The fall of Leica and it's rebirth as a brand name for another revolutionary device from Apple can be studied as a classical case of "old business" falling due to its own arrogance and inabilty to compete in the post-mechanical world of silicon and marketing.

Leica was one of the last big names of the second wave industrialism to disappear as a separate business entity. It was also just lucky to get it's debts paid and famous brand name saved. The nail to its coffin was the ill fated transformation into digital products company. In 2006 Leica finally caught up with the market and introduced a digital M8 camera. It was a bizzarre attempt at squeezing already dated digital technology into the shell of camera model created before World War 2. Absurdly high price did not justify the average performance. Good traditional looks were obscured by awful ergonomics, not fitting the digital functions. But the death knell came from marketing, or rather lack thereof. Leica M8 was released as an extremely buggy, untested device. For two years it was basically beta-tested by the hapless purchasers. As reportage camera it miserably failed in Iraqi wars, as wedding registration device it scared customers with loud noises and purple blacks in the pictures. But worst of all, when time was high for a new redeeming model, in 2008 it was re-released as M8.2, most bugs removed. Beta testing finished. In 2009 Leica filed for bankruptcy. From the ruins of what became known in business schools as the "big beta-test fraud", only the brand was saved: "Leica Optical" went to Panasonic for a penny, Apple got the use of "iLeica" name, in exchange for big lens orders with Panasonic.

iLeica will be pre-manufactured in 1 million sets just in time for Christmas. MSRP will be below 999$ for the system.

Kodak, recently purchased by the Russian gas and oil giant Gasprom....

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Howard, if you are awaiting a specific event, would it not be a good idea to leave the camera switched on? ... As long as you leave the LCD off the amount of power consumed is minimal.
When I know I am going to be taking fast moving events, I turn the auto power off to 'off' in the menu. The only thing is to remember to reset it to the usual (2, 5 or 10 minutes) after you have finished, or you will get a flat battery (guilty as charged).

You're right. In the specific event, I was overly careful (not wanting to waste the battery) and generally clumsy.

 

I set the camera to turn itself off only after a longer interval than usual, and I touched the release every time I thought to do so. And still missed the hoped-for event when it arrived.

 

Come to think of it, that's rather dumb, isn't it? To keep from wasting the battery I left the camera on auto-off, but then counteracted the setting by trying to keep it awake.

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Nugat--We need more input from you! <g>

 

I was thinking roughly similar thoughts

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Nugat--We need more input from you! <g>

 

Temporarily stranded at the Petersburg timeport in 1917. Can hear shooting outside. Will take some pictures with my MP.

Piotr

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Quote:

Originally Posted by sdai

How big is it going to be?

 

M9, Digital CL, 50/0.95, 24/1.4 ... all has been beaten to death on this board.

Boring.

 

Surprisingly big, IMO.

 

There's much to look forward to.

 

Stuff that will actually make a difference to the images you can take.

 

 

 

Now, was that all surprisingly BIG......

:D

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Leica should offer a trade-in program to the original M8 owners.

Owners of M 8 should be in a position to have their camera upgraded 8.2 including S and I think it is not a big deal since the difference between 8 upgraded and 8.2 is the S position...

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Firmware 2.00 does provide S for M8 owners, in the form of Auto Iso additionnal soft menu

with Set.

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Thanks for this quick reply...

 

I have updated to Firmware 2.0 where you have Auto ISO setting. I choose lens dependent option with slowest speed option... I think I did correctly the setting???

 

Regards

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