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Auto ISO Capabilities


Bobonli

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I think I will finally pull the trigger on a digital M, with an M10. I'd like some feedback on the camera's Auto ISO functionality. What I want to do is set aperture and shutter speed and let the camera select appropriate ISO so I don't have to make constant adjustments in changing light. 

I'm assuming the camera can do that based on my basic web-searches, though it looks like there are various ways to accomplish this. I'd be very appreciative if someone who has the camera would be kind enough to summarize how it works.

Thank you in advance.

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You will enjoy your M10. To get the floating ISO simply turn your ISO dial to A which is automatic and it will float to the maximum ISO you have set on your ISO Setup menu. The M setting on the dial is not going to give you what you are looking for - that is something different. The Auto ISO works very well. Just be sure you set what you want to be your max in your menu.  I think I have mine set at 2500 on my m10 R.  

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Posted (edited)
On 6/25/2024 at 3:57 AM, Bobonli said:

I think I will finally pull the trigger on a digital M, with an M10. I'd like some feedback on the camera's Auto ISO functionality. What I want to do is set aperture and shutter speed and let the camera select appropriate ISO so I don't have to make constant adjustments in changing light. 

I'm assuming the camera can do that based on my basic web-searches, though it looks like there are various ways to accomplish this. I'd be very appreciative if someone who has the camera would be kind enough to summarize how it works.

Thank you in advance.

Auto ISO in the M works the same as any other camera. 

Personally I don't use it and advise you to stay away from it. But someone told me that when I started using the M and I didn't listen either. It was only after a year of shooting that I forced myself to go all manual and I've never looked back. If you want to get consistent exposures in your shots then forget auto settings. You set the ISO and forget it. Pretend it's film. Small adjustments to shutter speeds won't matter as long as you give yourself enough ISO. If the camera decides then the brightness and darkness is going to be jumping all over the place. 

Say you're shooting a subject under a bunch of trees. It's on auto iso. You try a different composition and it just so happens that at the top of the frame there is a hole through the trees and there's nothing but bright sky. Now your subject is totally black because it's exposing for that hole. And you don't know because you're looking through a rangefinder. 

And it goes up and down in brightness like that as you move your camera around. 

It is really a royal pain in the ass. .the answer here is to give it exposure compensation. That just makes things worse by applying more gain and guessing what it needs. 

It's so much simpler to just go manual. You know what your exposure is and you set it. 

Edited by crons
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Posted (edited)

The wise use of Leica M is fixed ISO of course, where we find the best results.

but ...

 

...

I first use auto ISO feature recently and found that the camera's choises are "good enough" in most cases.

Why do I use this forgotten feature?

...

Beginning ...

When we visited North Thailand, my wife "forgot" so often changing ISO when we went from old dark pagoda interiors to sunny outsides.

So, I set on her M to auto ISO, and on my M too just to see.

 

For best results, choosing the right ISO ( my main choice can be anything 160 to 800 depending on my feeling).

For peace of mind, auto ISO is great when I'm lazy and the M behavior for this is "good enough" for me.

 

Nota: we use M240/246/262 because I have only one M10 (sharing one M for two is not practical)

Edited by a.noctilux
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Posted (edited)

The only scenario where auto ISO could work is indoors where all the light is the same. But then if you have a bright window in the background you run into problems. 

If I'm outside and I know my subjects are in the light, if the sun is blasting down then ISO100 I can set it and forget it. 

On a normal day early morning when I switch from light to dark ISO400 is best. 

ISO400 is my favorite ISO. If I had film it would all be ISO400. Unless I'm doing nights or indoors without any light then ISO400 fits most everything. Keeps my shutter speed high enough to shoot anything. 

If it's a rainy day in the morning and the sky is all clouds then ISO800. 

If I'm at the trains without light then ISO5000 Iis the best. The digital noise especiay in B&W is great.

If I'm there but it's sunny enough outside then ISO2500 will do. 

Mostly my camera is stuck on ISO400. I never think about ISO much. I set it when I arrive and I'm done with it. 

Edited by crons
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