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Dry Mount Question


Michael Hiles

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Good morning all,
I am considering moving from fiber based paper to resin based “paper”. (gererally Ilford papers). I almost always dry mount my prints. I am wondering if there is anything useful to know about dry mounting resin coated papers (temperatute  etc.) as opposed to fiber based paper. I do not want to melt the print or do any other damage. Currently I am using SEAL dry mount tissue.

I am currently using SEAL dry mount tissue in a lovely large SEAL dry mount press. It all works very well. But for various reasons (easy washing etc.), moving to resin papers seems like a good idea.

Can anyone (or everyone) give me the best tips for successful dry mounting resin papers...???

Many thanks.

Michael
 

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https://www.ilfordphoto.com/mounting-your-prints/
When I worked professionally we moved from fibre-based prints to resin-coated prints and dry mounted in exactly the same way without problems. Same dry-mount press, same tissue. That was using Ilford papers for different print sizes, including many large exhibition prints. This was many years ago, of course, but looking at the Ilford website (link above) it still seems to be a recommended method.
Geoff
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In the dim past I used Kodak dry mounting tissue for my prints on Agfa Portriga double weight paper.  I had access to a large heat mount press and the results were fantastic.  I never could get the image quality with RC based papers so I stayed away from them. Using lots of water to wash the Agfa papers came with the territory.  Nowadays I use foam core board with one side being self-adhesive.  Don't even need a press, Just a brayer plus the foam core is easier to trim.

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Agfa grade 6 was my favourite paper and this print is still my favourite after 50 years, taken with my M3 and 135mm Elmar. Used a domestic iron to carefully mount with dry tissue, trying not to get the shape of the iron to show on the print. Silicon release paper between the iron and print.

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Edited by Pyrogallol
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21 hours ago, Michael Hiles said:

I am considering moving from fiber based paper to resin based “paper”. (gererally Ilford papers). I almost always dry mount my prints. I am wondering if there is anything useful to know about dry mounting resin coated papers (temperatute  etc.) as opposed to fiber based paper. I do not want to melt the print or do any other damage. Currently I am using SEAL dry mount tissue.

The procedure for resin-coated paper is basically the same. Make sure to use a tissue that is recommended for the material. You'll need to fine-tune your temperature and time. In my experience, RC needs a slightly lower temperature, because corners will lift-up if you go too hot/long. That's a problem with FB as well, but I've found RC to be more prone to corner detachment.

You can also try some other techniques, especially if your prints are small (11x14 inches and less). RC is naturally flat, so you might be able to get away with photo corners, or paper tape, especially if you use overmats.

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My experience with RC paper, many years ago, is that it works basically the same as fiber, but you need to use a mounting tissue made for RC paper, which will spec a lower temperature (the RC paper will react to lower temp than fiber) and whatever time works.

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 3/26/2024 at 3:01 PM, George Collier said:

Sounds right, it seems to me that the old fiber based tissue, (MT5?) was around 210F and 20 to 30 seconds with my 16x20 press.

For the Ilford FB papers and Art 300, I use about 200-220ºF (~100ºC) for 2-1/2 minutes.  The heavier paper, especially the Art 300, need more heat/time to fully melt and set.  With less, I have seen the corners lift away from the mounting mat.

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On 6/6/2024 at 9:30 PM, Michael Hiles said:

Hugely useful - many thanks. Just the kind of thing I needed.

Old thread, but just came across.  I have nothing of value to contribute to the question posed, but offer my experience nonetheless.

I too used a SEAL press in my darkroom days, which I gave up in 2009. After switching to inkjet papers (many now finally rivaling fibre based papers in quality), I continued to mount, custom mat and frame my prints. But I stopped dry mounting and floating my prints, and instead switched to mounting prints on mat boards with simple T hinges and appropriate archival tape. I then cut my overmats  to overlap the mounted print, still with precise bevel edges.

If I were to go back to darkroom and silver prints (I won’t actually), I would definitely continue my current approach.  I would never want to give up the beauty of fibre based papers, and my new mounting process is infinitely simpler, quicker, archival, and the print can even be easily removed if desired.  Plus no hot, bulky press to store (or ship every time I move!)  And, most importantly, the resultant matted and framed prints still look marvelous when I do my job well.

Jeff

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