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BIG enlargements from M8?

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Guest guy_mancuso

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Grew up in Ortley beach right next to Seaside Heights beach and girlfriend had house in Beach heaven which i spent many summers there. Ron Jons the shack. Man are we showing our age or what. LOL

 

Nice area for images though . I enjoy seeing Daves shots brings back nice memories of a extremly fun childhood.

Girls:D

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Yeah Guy,

 

I just checked out Dave's sight. Nice!

 

Yeah, I remember being 16 and picking girls up on the beach, lifeguard dances, getting drunk (and other things) behind the dunes, surfing in the not so great waves of Surf City... seems like yesterday... not fourty years ago.

 

Tom

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I regularly make 24 X 36 scale prints from 10-12mp camera's ( Leica M8, Nikon D2X, and D200 ) using an HP Z3100. I always make my own profiles ( easy on the Z3100, but I previously used various spectrometers and scanners), and use Qimage to print, resizing / interpolating to 1200 DPI for the final print size, with level 4 (default is 5) final sharpening.

 

I shoot only RAW, processing Nikons with Capture NX, and Leica with Photoshop CS.

 

At that size, Lens quality, and shooting / post processing technique matter more than which camera is used.

 

For very large landscapes, ( 24 X 80 etc. ) I shoot multi frame tiled panoramas, which for close up sharpness exceed any large digital or film format, as images > 200 mpixel are routine, and the corners are as sharp as the center. Of course, to do this both the subject and the lighting have to hold still for 10 minutes or so. These also bring my computer to it's knees in post processing ( 2 X 3Ghz and 3 GB RAM ).

 

On a recent trip to the Hermitage, I found that the M8, because it had no mirror, or viewfinder blackout, let me handhold quite well down to 1/15 with a 35mm f2 summicron, with excellent results.

 

I hope you find this helpful.

 

Regards .... Harold

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Guest guy_mancuso
Yeah Guy,

 

I just checked out Dave's sight. Nice!

 

Yeah, I remember being 16 and picking girls up on the beach, lifeguard dances, getting drunk (and other things) behind the dunes, surfing in the not so great waves of Surf City... seems like yesterday... not fourty years ago.

 

Tom

 

can we go back is the real question. LOL

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but the real wow comes from 16x24 inch prints on Harmon Gloss taken with the M8. Its just a better fit.

I think 16x24 is definitely the sweet spot for the M8, DMR, and Canon 1Ds2. Never printed from the 5D. 20x30 is really just bigger and starts to lose that sense of clarity where I feel I no longer look into the print but rather at it. It's still okay though. This is on an Epson 7600, so not exactly the latest technology. (I keep thinking I should repurpose it for K7 and get a 3800 for color.)

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Tom, I have an interest in printing on canvas.

 

I have an Epson 2400, so only a 13-inch capacity. Is there a book you would recommend, and does it make sense to go down this road with a skinny printer?

 

tnx,

 

Bill,

 

I can not think of a good book for canvas but I'm working on an ebook that will end up on the web site I'm working on (in my spare time - something that is quite rare).

 

Canvas is not all that hard. It takes good profiles and some hand work coating and stretching. Most canvases tend to be quite a bit bigger than 13 inches, so you might want to look at a 24 inch printer. Since you'll need to pull the canvas over stretcher bars, you'll be limited to 20 inch prints using a 24 inch printer or 11 inch prints using a 13 inch printer. That's why we use the 44 inch printers.

 

With the 7880/9880/11880 printers comming out, there will be lots of good used 7800 and 9800 on the market. The trick is to get one that has been used but not abused. Big printers need to make prints to keep their lines and heads clean. There is nothing worse than a low mileage large format printer, as replacing dry or clogged heads can cost in the neighborhood of $1,500 to $2,500. And replacing heads yourself is not a job for the fainthearted. I run my printers hard and replace them every 2 or 3 years. The old ones get donated to local schools - though one of my old 9600s went to an artist and still kicks out 60 to 120 canvases every month.

 

For what it is worth, I use Cranes Maestro Matte and Fredrix 901 WR canvases and give them three coats of Neschen or Breathing Color giclee varnish. The 901 is a nice micro pore canvas and yields prints with archival ratings exceeding 100 years with the varnish. However, corners can crack if you don't give it enough dry time between coats or use too much pressure. The Cranes canvas handels this type of abuse better. Unvarnished canvas is an invitation to future disaster. All it takes is moment for some well intentioned person with some windex or other cleaner to destroy your art.

 

This could burn up a lot of electronic ink, so if you want drop me an email at printmaker@hawaiilink.net and I'd be happy to help you get started.

 

Tom

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Hi Dave,

 

Spent most of my childhood years on Long Beach Island! That was until the storm of 1962 washed away my father's house in Harvey Cedars as well as the development he was building, Love Ladies Harbor. My grandfather's house in Ship Bottom survived the storm and I spent my summers there until 1967. Loved that island. I'm about 8,000 miles to the west now on the Hawaiian island of Kauai. It still has a lot of the feel of Long Beach Island of the 50s and 60s. But this too is changing fast.

 

Congrats on selling you photos. Widas?

 

For what its worth, 20x30 on 24x36 paper in a clear bag with a foamcore backing is my best selling size. My observation is that qualitywise, 16x24 holds the sharpness and tonality of a M8 file better. Its not a big difference... its more like looking at a print made from a 6x7 neg vs a print made from a 6x4.5. But you're right, big sells.

 

Tom

 

Tom: what a pleasant surprise to hear from someone that grew up on LBI! The place that I exhibit is Buckalew's in Beach Haven. The original Wida's building is still there, but it was completly gutted and internally & externally rebuilt, and named "Daddy O's". I shoot on the north end often, and love the Barnegat dunes. I agree that 16"x24" seems to be the sweet spot for M8 files for color prints (that's as large as I've gone), but I have gone 20"x30" for M8 B&Ws and it works nicely.

Guy: the shack is on it's last legs (the roof collapsed), and Ron Jon's is still there. Tom: my grand parents on both sides lived year around on LBI so I have been coming here since I was born (1937). We had a small place here, then 3 years ago when my wife retired we sold the little LBI place and our other home in Haddon Twp, and bought a bigger bay front place (if you call 2 bedrooms/2 baths "bigger"), and are full time residents in Beach Haven.

Best to all from LBI....

Dave

Home

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Yeah Guy,

 

I just checked out Dave's sight. Nice!

 

Yeah, I remember being 16 and picking girls up on the beach, lifeguard dances, getting drunk (and other things) behind the dunes, surfing in the not so great waves of Surf City... seems like yesterday... not fourty years ago.

 

Tom

 

Apologies for veering decidedly off topic but I grew up in north Jersey in the 60s and every chance we got we hopped in someone's car and headed down to Long Beach Island to engage in the same activities as Tom. How wonderfully strange to have all those memories suddenly stirred up in a conversation about big enlargements from an M8, esp as I moved 3500 miles east, first to Switzerland and then to London and haven't been back to NJ since the mid 80's. It does seem like yesterday... sigh...

 

Eric

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Apologies for veering decidedly off topic but I grew up in north Jersey in the 60s and every chance we got we hopped in someone's car and headed down to Long Beach Island to engage in the same activities as Tom. How wonderfully strange to have all those memories suddenly stirred up in a conversation about big enlargements on an M8, esp as I moved 3500 miles east, first to Switzerland and then to London and haven't been back to NJ since the mid 80's. It does seem like yesterday... sigh...

 

Eric

 

Small world isn't it? If anyone is on or near LBI get in touch, and I'll take you to my favorite spots (to photograph, and drink!!).

Dave

LBI, NJ;)

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I regularly make 24 X 36 scale prints from 10-12mp camera's ( Leica M8, Nikon D2X, and D200 ) using an HP Z3100. I always make my own profiles ( easy on the Z3100, but I previously used various spectrometers and scanners), and use Qimage to print, resizing / interpolating to 1200 DPI for the final print size, with level 4 (default is 5) final sharpening.

 

Z3100 does not accep barytah paper, because it is limited to 0,8 mm. Correct ?

Plus, says my seller here, it leaves traces of "pizza wheels" on the print, visible

in transparency.

Plus, he says, it's too much automatised, and sometimes the driver gets it wrong

when loading paper. Correct too ?

I wonder about all these matters, because I'm chasing now the right printer and my choise narrowes between 4880 or Z3100…

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I am one of the fortunate ones who have a large (16X20) photo of Gurtches favorite images. the image is known as Polly's Dock and lights up my gallery space like few others, including my own. He is a real talent and I am fortunate to know him and have some of his work to share with others.

 

go Gurtch

 

Woody Spedden

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Z3100 does not accep barytah paper, because it is limited to 0,8 mm. Correct ?

Plus, says my seller here, it leaves traces of "pizza wheels" on the print, visible

in transparency.

Plus, he says, it's too much automatised, and sometimes the driver gets it wrong

when loading paper. Correct too ?

I wonder about all these matters, because I'm chasing now the right printer and my choise narrowes between 4880 or Z3100…

 

I have a Z3100 arriving this Friday and have ordered a loooong roll of Ilford Baryta paper, which according to the Ilford website is 100 compatible as long as you use the gloss optimiser.

 

As for the rest of the workflow, I have as yet no idea. I have a steep learning curve here: the largest prints I've done personally from my M8 have been a3+ though I have had up to 40" commercially done and they looked pretty good. But I suspect that a whole new world of sharpening techniques is about to loom over my horizon.

 

Anyone with experience here? I'd love to know what steps people take from M8 DNG to HPZ3100...

 

Best

 

Tim

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Thank you, I'm glad to hear that, Tim.

In fact, I had another reply about Z3100 from an enthusiastic colleague in Paris, here :

Neil Snape - Photographer and Color Management Specialist

Very interesting review from someone who worked professionally with it for about a year.

You want to check if your model is equipped with the new design of HP rollers — previous design left some marks on the back of some papers.

Cheers

Johan F.

 

PS : You have a nice series of Ipics-phone on your page ;-)

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Neil's stuff rocks (I remember him from the old RG forum!)...and he was always on top of the printing end too...

 

@Tim--if you haven't already, I'd pick up a copy of Alien Skin Blow Up. Yes, there are ways to mimic what it does in PS with different enlargement techniques (Jack Flesher has the best I've seen so far), but for all 'round all purpose very large-scale printing it's hard to be the facility of Blow Up (lets you sharpen, add grain/noise and uses pretty great interpolation too).

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