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Hello everyone,

I have an Apple MacBook Pro where the display setting (in System Preferences/Displays/Presets) is set to: Apple XDR Display (P3-1600 nits).

There's also an option to change that to Photography (P3-D65)

What would be the correct selection?

Thank you,

Rino

 

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Posted (edited)

The Apple XDR Display setting is for the 32" Pro Display XDR monitor. If you are only using the MacBook Pro Display (2021 model), then this is the correct choice:

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Erik

Edited by egrossman
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I should add that my monitor is profiled. So this preset is a copy of the standard Photography preset including the "Fine-tune the calibration" option from the Presets menu where the white point X&Y and Luminance of the display are chosen.

My display was calibrated with the Calibrite ColorChecker Display Plus and included software.

Erik

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Thank you Erik for the quick response.

I have the MacBook Pro 14" - 2021 it was set at: Apple XDR Display (P3-1600 nits) before I did a color calibration with i1 Display Pro (XRite).

Called Apple support who were not sure if I should use the Photography setting, so they suggested to leave it at Apple XDR.

It sounds like I should switch it to Photography setting and recalibrate.

Thank you!

Rino

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Any suggestions for the color LCD type?

 

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I have a new MBP as of a couple of weeks ago. Mine was also on the Apple XDR display settings, so I took this advice and switched to Photography. The display immediately brightened a lot, and I can no longer adjust brightness with the keyboard keys. I'm new to how Apple does things, but is there some logic behind this? When I've calibrated a separate screen before (in Windows, with an XRite device), you are instructed to reduce the brightness quite a bit - the rationale being that a lower brightness is more consistent with the brightness you will see in a print. Does Apple assume that printing is a minority interest now, so ignores it, or have I misunderstood things?

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3 hours ago, LocalHero1953 said:

I have a new MBP as of a couple of weeks ago. Mine was also on the Apple XDR display settings, so I took this advice and switched to Photography. The display immediately brightened a lot, and I can no longer adjust brightness with the keyboard keys. I'm new to how Apple does things, but is there some logic behind this? When I've calibrated a separate screen before (in Windows, with an XRite device), you are instructed to reduce the brightness quite a bit - the rationale being that a lower brightness is more consistent with the brightness you will see in a print. Does Apple assume that printing is a minority interest now, so ignores it, or have I misunderstood things?

The reason for this is that you are supposed to use the fine-tune settings to set your white point for X&Y and Luminance after measuring the correct values with profiling device together with software i1 Profiler (I use Calibrite's Display Plus for example). Once you have the values and you correct the white point and luminance you then profile your display. The brightness is locked so that it doesn't change the luminance value and therefore accuracy of your profile.

This is the best video explaining the process that I have seen Although it's about the Studio Display, it's just as relevant to the MacBook Pro.

Erik

 

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Which setting you use depends on what you want to do.

The new MBPs feature XDR displays. The XDR profile uses the P3 color gamut and allows the display to use the 1500 nits when needed. It allows the use of True Tone, Night Shift and auto brightness.  The auto brightness may have been the reason that the display appeared dim for @egrossman. I keep this disabled since I prefer to use the keyboard keys to adjust the brightness.

The Photography setting is supposed to be better suited to photography use. I'm not sure if that means more aligned to print or better aligned to what a camera sensor can capture or something else entirely. It also locks the brightness at less than 100%. I don't know for sure but I suspect that it also disables True Tone & Night Shift.

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https://support.apple.com/en-in/guide/mac-help/mchlca6faa13/mac

Photography (P3-D65): Configures the display for use in typical digital photography workflows. This mode uses wide colour P3 primaries with the D65 whitepoint typically used for screen-based viewing. It is for use in appropriately set up and controlled viewing environments.

Also useful: https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT210435

Erik

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You need to be able to adjust monitor contrast to that of the print if you want to properly edit images. I could not find a way to do this on the ASD. Note, contrast ratio on a monitor is roughly 1000:1 in most instances, but print is only 200:1 for something like Epson Exhibition Fiber. To get at this ratio you need to bump the black level such that when divided into the luminance results in proper paper contrast (e.g. for 80 candela luminance, a black level of 0.4 would furnish a contrast ratio of 200:1). This is straightforward to do on an Eizo, but I could not get it sorted on the Apple Studio display. Add to that the gloss screen, and forget about this monitor for serious image editing with the print being the end result. Also, D65 is useless to approximate paper white. Much better between D50 and D58. The ASD is just a consumer bit of glitz, not to be taken seriously as an image editing tool.

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