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Black pro mist filter


stephengv
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On 8/9/2021 at 4:50 PM, toothlessdentist said:

I can attest to a positive experience of 5 years of shooting with the Tiffen Black Pro Mist 1/8 living on all my M & R lenses (1956-1995 range) , both on my Leica M240 and Leica M3. For portraits, landscape, street, everything… I won’t go into what the filter is designed to do because I’m assuming if you’re reading this you’ve understood the intention…

My background is in the cinema, and we are constantly filtering beautifully sharp and outrageously-priced glass to create the look “in camera” via a mattebox, not in post. I’ve found these Tiffen Black Pro mist filters to be the best solution to achieve the same while shooting both photo and video with lenses of these small sizes.

I advise against stacking multiple filters (NDS, colour) with BPM in general if you’d like to avoid vignettes.

 

IM USING:

1/8 Black Pro Mist *  37, 40.5, 55, 77mm

1/4 Black Pro Mist  37, 40.5, 55, 77mm

1/8 Warm Black Pro Mist   40.5mm


SIZE:

The 37mm are the smallest of the available filters and I’ve had success using them with 39-37mm STEP-DOWN ring with no/minimal vignetting on my vintage 50mm Summicron/35mm Summicron respectively.

40.5mm are the smallest filters available to cover 39mm thread Leica glass using a 39-40.5 STEP-UP ring. This is my suggested setup as older filters for 40.5 size are more available online, it maintains small profile, and doesn’t vignette. 

77mm 1/8th BPM functions for my Cine-Modded LEITZ R set, with 55-77mm (80O.D. for mattebox attachment).
 

STRENGTH: 

*1/8 BPM is my go-to, living on as many lens as I can afford them to be on… “subtle” is the key word here, which confuses & draws some critique from some online but I personally love this look for everything I shoot.

1/4 BPM is the highest intensity I would personally use without going down a deeply “artistic soft” direction. 1/4 BPM has a noticeable filter look. For me it moves from a subtle image adjustment to a noticeable filtered effect, both in photo and video. I like this filter but use it for studio portraits with older people, or for an even softer “cinematic film look” look when shooting video wide open on sharp Sony sensors.

I am working with lenses opening up no more than f/2 and cannot comment on mixing it with some of the “softer” wide lenses that open wider.

That’s my take, and feel free to AMA, but otherwise you do you!

 

@ mitchellsturm  via instagram for images

Really helpful, many thanks. As someone with experience just in stills photography, I feel I can learn a lot from people like you with a background in cinema! I get the impression that cinematographers are rather up to speed in knowing how to use some of these filters, including detuning the "digital" look into something more subtle and beautiful.

I'm recently using a 1/4 Black Pro Mist on a medium format GFX100S. Early days, but so far am liking the filter across many scenes, from portraits to landscapes.

Personally I find this Black Pro Mist more controlled and less over the top than I'd expected, gently lifting the strength of the blacks and shadows, but with a halation of the highlights that is a bit reminiscent of, well, a Leica "glow" of an older lens.  I also find this effect is reminiscent of some of my images off 5x4 + Schneider Super Symmar 110 XL.  See an example below of a forest scene, where there seems to be gentle halation of the light coming through the trees in the background.  It's a subtle glow on this film shot, but to me it makes a large difference to the beauty of the image that might have ended up more harshly rendered with an unfiltered digital capture.  I expect (TBD) that the Black Pro Mist will help my digital get closer to the subtly dreamier look like that I so enjoy off film.  Also looking to get a Tiffen Glimmerglass 1, and will see if / how that is any different to the Pro Mist.  A lot still to try out and learn, but I feel like I'm heading in a good direction now to attaining more gentle and cinematic images off my digital camera via such filters.

 

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