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That question is rhetorical, of course.

Coming from film, I was always careful about how many pictures I used to take - film and processing was expensive, especially Kodachrome 64 and 25, which I used when I could afford it.  I didn’t bracket as much as I should have, and I certainly didn’t machine gun.  I took care to get the exposure right, timed it, and took the picture.  There was no point in taking more than one image …

Now, I’m reading a number of comments - the battery is too small, I need a large capacity SD card for a day’s shooting, and then if you love your photography, you really must print … I don’t get it.  How much processing must these photographic heroes do, and what on earth do they do with all those prints?

Back in the day, I’d go through a 36 exposure roll of film a week.  With digital, I do take more, but the process of seeing an image unfold, thinking where to take the picture from and when, exposure etc is pretty much the same.  Once I’ve downloaded the images, very few would make the cut for printing - lots of processing, and then getting it printed (I print so few, I see no justification in buying a printer, though I’m thinking of it).  Once printed, it serves no use if it isn’t hung on the wall, and that includes framing …

So, for those who fire off enough images to need to carry three spare batteries and spare high capacity SD cards, how long do you spend processing, and what on earth do you do with the hundreds of prints you must accumulate in a year …

I am genuinely curious.

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That question is rhetorical, of course. Coming from film, I was always careful about how many pictures I used to take - film and processing was expensive, especially Kodachrome 64 and 25, which I used when I could afford it.  I didn’t bracket as much as I should have, and I certainly didn’t machine gun.  I took care to get the exposure right, timed it, and took the picture.  There was no point in taking more than one image … Now, I’m reading a number of comments - the battery is too sm

I still shoot like it's film.  Made less than 10 exposures today.

The same for my use, easily much less than a 36 exposure roll when I go out with a camera .........then I print whatever image "works" if any do so. I use 16gb SD cards and rarely fill them even with the M10-M file sizes. When they are full or near enough I don't re-format them I file them away like negatives and "load" a new one. The lower MP cards are cheap enough. In fact I am presently halfway through the construction of a darkroom here at my home in France, ( this was the first ho

I had a similar thought recently as well but the context was a bit different. Basically when I got my m10m in early 2020 I out a 64gb card in it. I havent filled half of it up yet (I haven't formatted it since) and have plenty of room left such that I don't see the need to delete my first pictures by the camera or format the card. Essentially my entire library of m10m shots are on that card. When I got my m10d used last year in December, I put the smallest but fastest card i had on hand for it - which was a 16gb. I've only filled the card up because I did a shoot for someone and that was about 120 pictures. The amount of space left has been about 5 to 15 shots since April when I did the shoot, and whenever it gets any lower I'd just delete some pics from the shoot to maintain about 15 shots worth of room. No anxiety. When I go out, I always have a camera with me but I shoot on average 1 to 5 frames.

I then conversed with some other casual photographers and they told me when they shooting or bring the camera out with them, they can easily shoot 30 to 50 shots a day or more. I could rack up that many if I was tourist-ing, maybe more, but not on a regular basis. It made me wonder if I was under-utilising my cameras (so much so I put my m10d up for sale). I've been too busy lately and have become lazy in my free time and so I only process once every few months..I haven't printed a picture in years.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Likaleica said:

I still shoot like it's film.  Made less than 10 exposures today.

The same for my use, easily much less than a 36 exposure roll when I go out with a camera .........then I print whatever image "works" if any do so.

I use 16gb SD cards and rarely fill them even with the M10-M file sizes. When they are full or near enough I don't re-format them I file them away like negatives and "load" a new one. The lower MP cards are cheap enough.

In fact I am presently halfway through the construction of a darkroom here at my home in France, ( this was the first house I have owned that hasn't had a darkroom, well until now ), as I step back into using film more for my personal work. I will still print on my Epsons, but capture and process on film.

M10-R? M10R-BP? M11? Not for me, hopefully I am done with the costly digital dance and with crossed fingers what digital M's I have will see me out.

Not fully recovered from Leica M GAS though. I ordered a month ago a black MP that should be on it's way in a couple of weeks when the gnomes at Wetzlar complete one for me.

Edited by petermullett
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6 hours ago, petermullett said:

The same for my use, easily much less than a 36 exposure roll when I go out with a camera .........then I print whatever image "works" if any do so.

I use 16gb SD cards and rarely fill them even with the M10-M file sizes. When they are full or near enough I don't re-format them I file them away like negatives and "load" a new one. The lower MP cards are cheap enough.

In fact I am presently halfway through the construction of a darkroom here at my home in France, ( this was the first house I have owned that hasn't had a darkroom, well until now ), as I step back into using film more for my personal work. I will still print on my Epsons, but capture and process on film.

M10-R? M10R-BP? M11? Not for me, hopefully I am done with the costly digital dance and with crossed fingers what digital M's I have will see me out.

Not fully recovered from Leica M GAS though. I ordered a month ago a black MP that should be on it's way in a couple of weeks when the gnomes at Wetzlar complete one for me.

Peter, I feel like I could have written this post, right down to the building a darkroom part.  And the bit about living in France.  My sentiments exactly.

I have an M3 built the same year I was (1954 - but I rolled out of the factory early Jan 55).  I can put a roll of Tri-X in it and get exactly the same result as whomever bought it new. (well, not exactly, because Tri-X has less silver these days).  

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My first Leica was a M9 followed by whatever digital M generation Leica made up until now (I skipped the P, R and D versions).  I always had 2 batteries.  One in the camera, one in the charger.  Whenever I picked up my camera for a shooting journey I replaced the battery in the camera with the fully charged one.  In more than eleven years I never ever encountered an empty battery during the day.  So discussions about limited battery capacity are always puzzling me. 

I started digital photography in 1999.  I kept all my pictures I took since then.  I have 20K pictures on my server.   I go out with my camera roughly 3 days a week.  Meaning 150 days per year or 3300 "digital photo days".... or an average of 6 captures per day.  When I'm honest, one out of these six gets through the initial screening process and is "developed" and "tweaked" in Lightroom, and of course they are not alway "keepers"

When you think about this it would have been much more cost effective if I would have acquired a film M in 1999 and stick with it instead of chasing the digital race for more features, more pixels, better ISO, better... more ...  I get now  the uncomfortable feeling that these digital "keepers" were expensive as hell 😲.

 

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Posted (edited)
vor 13 Stunden schrieb IkarusJohn:

That question is rhetorical, of course.

Coming from film, I was always careful about how many pictures I used to take - film and processing was expensive, especially Kodachrome 64 and 25, which I used when I could afford it.  I didn’t bracket as much as I should have, and I certainly didn’t machine gun.  I took care to get the exposure right, timed it, and took the picture.  There was no point in taking more than one image …

Now, I’m reading a number of comments - the battery is too small, I need a large capacity SD card for a day’s shooting, and then if you love your photography, you really must print … I don’t get it.  How much processing must these photographic heroes do, and what on earth do they do with all those prints?

Back in the day, I’d go through a 36 exposure roll of film a week.  With digital, I do take more, but the process of seeing an image unfold, thinking where to take the picture from and when, exposure etc is pretty much the same.  Once I’ve downloaded the images, very few would make the cut for printing - lots of processing, and then getting it printed (I print so few, I see no justification in buying a printer, though I’m thinking of it).  Once printed, it serves no use if it isn’t hung on the wall, and that includes framing …

So, for those who fire off enough images to need to carry three spare batteries and spare high capacity SD cards, how long do you spend processing, and what on earth do you do with the hundreds of prints you must accumulate in a year …

I am genuinely curious.

Between 2 and 35 (Digital & MF)

Edited by analog-digital
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Posted (edited)

I shoot roughly the same amount with digital as I did with film… per outing…but more overall since I retired about the same time I transitioned to digital and gave up my darkrooms.  I’m still very judicious about choosing pics for printing, with very few making the cut from work print to final stage.  But I’ve always done my own matting and framing, mostly smallish black and white prints, which I prefer.  These get rotated now and then to keep things fresh, and occasionally sold or gifted. I still receive compliments from those receiving prints as gifts, many years after they’ve long forgotten about other presents.  Mostly, though, I just enjoy the print itself, and the pleasure from the total process from shot to final display. Many prints in my house, however, are from other collected vintage works, which bring similar joy. Same with my book collection.

Jeff

Edited by Jeff S
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Back to the pre-digital days I shoot about 2 rolls a day if travel out and 1~2 rolls per week if at home. I develop at home.

Now with digital mixed with films, I shoot a lot more in digital, probably 2~3x. I try to bracket with zoom, including foot-zoom. Digital serves partly as pre-proof. It dramatically reduces the clicking of film shutter, but I still try to finish a roll in the end of the day. So it would be 12exp if 6x6 and 24exp if 54mmx24mm panorama. Rarely exceeds one roll in a week if at home or one roll a day if travel out. 

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Same here. When I was pro wedding photographer during the film area I was always calculating. You cannot afford to miss highlights because you are just rewinding the film…. Even with two bodies and a third backup body it was needed to anticipate on the expected and the non-expected.
The other thing I took with me from that time period is to take my pictures consciously. First think what you want to achieve and shoot then. I usually went home with may be 8-10 rolls.

Quite some digital photographers nowadays with no analog background seem to think that their camera is a machine gun.  But more isn’t always better, although you might find always something useable between those thousands of pictures they are taking home….

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Somewhere between 1 and 3000 images per day.....

Digital is not film. I moved forward when I converted to digital. I shot film for decades both for fun and money. I no longer shoot film and I don't miss it.

I shoot what the situation requires. At a wedding 1500 frames is pretty normal. When I am allowed to travel 500 shots a day is conservative.

Although I shoot more than many I still don't understand using burst shooting for a dog or screaming child. Spraying and praying isn't photography. Well it is, just without the skill.

Gordon

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I shoot digital like I shot 35mm film.

But I shot 35mm film like a professional photojournalist (even when I wasn't a professional photojournalist):

- You are NOT allowed to come back without pictures

- "film is cheap"

- Not every picture needs to be a masterpiece - it just needs to fulfill a function successfully and creatively.

- No one gets any credit for the pictures they didn't take.

- No one cares what your relative "keeper rate" is - they only care what your absolute "keeper rate" is.

- If you shoot a good moment, you can't be complacent and stop shooting. You keep looking for a better moment (or a better idea). There will almost always be a better moment or a better idea. Unless you fail to look for it.

Corollary - shoot scared. Assume that every picture you have made so far is pointless, mediocre crap, and you will get fired if you don't find something better.

Then you will be amazed at how many "better" pictures you can find when you try.

- if you shoot a good picture - immediately turn around 180° and look behind you (tip from Sue Drinker at the Jackson Hole Photo Workshop, 1999).

Parable 1: In 1977, I got an offer to shoot a 3-day event (the bicentennial of a school). The organizers and I decided we needed 70 rolls of color slide film - the goal was a multimedia multiscreen show. I shot all of it (2500 frames), they used about 30% of it, they were glad I had not "missed" anything important.

Parable 2: Costa Manos shot a similar project in 1975-75 for Boston's celebration of the U.S. Bicentennial. I don't know how much he shot - but the final production used 3100 color slides (and 40 projectors), as well as about 100 B&W pictures that walled the presentation site, and also formed the commemorative book Bostonians.

https://www.cambridgeseven.com/project/wheres-boston/

https://www.amazon.com/Bostonians-Photographs-Wheres-Constantine-Manos/dp/B0006CJE5E

https://www.magnumphotos.com/arts-culture/society-arts-culture/constantine-manos-the-bostonians/

(BTW, those both demonstrate that the idea that "only prints count" comes from an uninformed perspective. There are many many ways great photography reaches its audience.)

Parable 3: When Garry Winogrand died, he left behind 2500 unprocessed rolls of film, 6500 processed but unproofed rolls, 20,000 contact sheets, and 100,000 negatives. Coincidentally, his work is still being seen and/or purchased (and thus influencing people and culture) in books, galleries and museums 35 years after his death.

There is probably a connection between his working habits and his success. Ya think?

Closing quotes:

"What's hit's history; what's missed is mystery." - Arthur Ransome, Great Northern

"There is no hope for the satisfied man." - Frederick G. Bonfils, founder of The Denver Post

"The only thing sillier than being a forgettable mediocrity is studying hard to be a forgettable mediocrity." - Adan

"A heart [or an eye] is not judged by how much you love - but by how much you are loved by others." - The Wizard of Oz to the Tin Woodman.

"I ain't a-sayin' you treated me unkind
You could have done better but I don't mind
You just kinda wasted my precious time
But don't think twice, it's all right." - Bob Dylan

Edited by adan
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I never believed in one picture and done. You can say that can fill few 256GB cards a day in a few cameras, when I work all day 3000-5000 is normal.

My passion is observing places and people, for that to tell a story you often have to work the scene. You see a moment in place , anticipate and be always ready for the moment, take one and keep looking if the moment improves take another, take a detail and a wide. Eventually you have a visual story. 

I suggest to my students to take multiple photos when you have people and animals in one scene, someone always is looking funny or talking, if 3 people are in the picture I will quickly take 6 photos ( single shot mode), you will be surprising what a millisecond makes.

My last point is that photography is a continuous visual learning experience and if you don't shoot you can't learn and improve from successes and failures .

 

I am glad I shot lots of film when film was the only way, I have photos of NYC that look vintage and they where take only 20 years ago, great fun looking back and printing does!

 

Edited by Photoworks
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10 hours ago, Photoworks said:

I never believed in one picture and done. You can say that can fill few 256GB cards a day in a few cameras, when I work all day 3000-5000 is normal.

My passion is observing places and people, for that to tell a story you often have to work the scene. You see a moment in place , anticipate and be always ready for the moment, take one and keep looking if the moment improves take another, take a detail and a wide. Eventually you have a visual story. 

I suggest to my students to take multiple photos when you have people and animals in one scene, someone always is looking funny or talking, if 3 people are in the picture I will quickly take 6 photos ( single shot mode), you will be surprising what a millisecond makes.

My last point is that photography is a continuous visual learning experience and if you don't shoot you can't learn and improve from successes and failures .

 

I am glad I shot lots of film when film was the only way, I have photos of NYC that look vintage and they where take only 20 years ago, great fun looking back and printing does!

 

Good advice, thank you.

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On a typical outing I'll shoot somewhere between 1-30 versions of any given scene, winding up with 60-300+ exposures depending.  The higher per scene number comes from variations in the form of changes to angle and perspective, occasionally focal length, as well as altering exposure parameters to accommodate sky or shadow. Often the variants involve waiting around for addition random events to augment the shot, a bird flying off, a cyclist passing by, etc.  I typically travel all over New England to random locations, often hours away, rarely know precisely where I am nor how exactly to return there.  Having to return to redo a shot is the last thing I want to do. Hence I prefer to fully overwork the scene rather than realize once home that I had underworked it.

 

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I’m definitely on the lower end of taking pictures, similarly conditioned by needing to save to afford Kodachrome back in the day. I’ve been taking pictures since c1979, sometimes more regularly than others.  I went almost entirely digital in 2008. In all that time, I have accumulated around 1800 keepers (some scans, some digital), of which only around 30 I count as worthy of a 4-star rating. 

When travelling, I will take more (but not necessarily keep) but otherwise, it would be very unusual for me to take more than 10-15 pictures on a day’s outing. Did that on Saturday. Haven’t bothered downloading them yet: I’ll do that in a few weeks or so.

I suspect my hit rate is low simply because I take so few pictures that I don’t get in the groove or get my eye in compositionally. I was trying to up my game on that, then along came a pesky pandemic…

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On 6/26/2021 at 10:45 AM, Stef63 said:

When you think about this it would have been much more cost effective if I would have acquired a film M in 1999 and stick with it instead of chasing the digital race for more features, more pixels, better ISO, better... more ...  I get now  the uncomfortable feeling that these digital "keepers" were expensive as hell 😲.

 

My math worked out the opposite way.  I shoot enough volume that a digital leica is more affordable than film, developing, and scanning.  Still have an M2 for fun though.  As long as you had fun and made images you are proud of, I think you made a good choice.

 

To answer the original post, I am a working photographer and shoot portraits 1-3 times a week, each time shooting between 100 and 500 frames, which are then culled to 6-30 keepers.  I use adobe lightroom classic to quickly edit the photos, and it lets me do in a day what used to take me 2 weeks to accomplish.  I usually print books for clients and occasionally make prints of my absolute favorites for myself.   
 

Only when traveling do I need multiple memory cards and several batteries, but as a professional I always keep them ready as a precaution.
 

 

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A few years ago on a trip to Jerusalem, my partner and I headed off early to the old city hoping to beat the crowds at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre.  I’d considered the lens I needed, and we headed off.  Got to the church to find I had no battery at all …😖

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