Jump to content

I ordered the m10-r black paint


JimmyCheng

Recommended Posts

Advertisement (gone after registration)

10 hours ago, jdlaing said:

Better wood? From better trees?

Grain, no knots in it, colour, density, the tone it produces. There'll be better quality wood in the same tree, there'll be better quality tree's in the same forest depending on the growing conditions. But how to equate this with something you have in Texas as you don't have any trees. OK, there are cows and then there are better cows, and if you want to reskin your banjo go for a cow with a better hide.

Link to post
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, 250swb said:

Grain, no knots in it, colour, density, the tone it produces. There'll be better quality wood in the same tree, there'll be better quality tree's in the same forest depending on the growing conditions. But how to equate this with something you have in Texas as you don't have any trees. OK, there are cows and then there are better cows, and if you want to reskin your banjo go for a cow with a better hide.

I play classical guitar and own two luthier build instruments with precious tonewoods. Top notch tonewood is very rare. For example one out of 100 spruce trees has the quality needed for performance level instruments like violins or guitars. The best trees come from the higher altitude of the European Alps regions. Old Stradivari picked his spruce from Val di Fiemme/Italy. That's why Val di Fiemme is heavily over exploited today as generations of violin makers insisted on 'Strad wood'. And even harder to get hold of is exotic wood for back & sides. One set of old Brasilian rosewood with spectacular appearance and  fitted with proper CITES documentation can cost 2000 to 3000 Euro. Only the set, not the guitar. So playing good guitars und shooting with Leica equipment is an expensive mix of hobbies.🙂

Link to post
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, 250swb said:

Grain, no knots in it, colour, density, the tone it produces. There'll be better quality wood in the same tree, there'll be better quality tree's in the same forest depending on the growing conditions. But how to equate this with something you have in Texas as you don't have any trees. OK, there are cows and then there are better cows, and if you want to reskin your banjo go for a cow with a better hide.

You are very misinformed about the trees here. This is not England. And there is no better or worse wood in any same tree. Only different.

Link to post
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, jdlaing said:

You are very misinformed about the trees here. This is not England. And there is no better or worse wood in any same tree. Only different.

Well, there is “different” wood in any given tree - wood with knots, heartwood and sapwood, and then there is the wood that isn’t used at all.

You are right that there is different wood in any given tree, but there certainly is “better or worse wood”, depending on which bit of the usable log is cut, and how.  This is reflected in the price.  A lot of “wood” is not used at all - the waste in most milling, from the entire tonnage of the “tree” is surprising.  In any given log, the outer layer (inside the bark) is “sapwood”, and tends to be wet and softer than the inner heartwood layers, the cambium.  These are usually darker.  The outer sapwood is also where the knots are found.  The transition from cambium to sapwood is often the best, whereas in many older trees the centre section of the heartwood is often decayed, and not so good at all.

So, I’m not so sure you are right, though clearly there is a lot more to it than your statement.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Advertisement (gone after registration)

How about a kinsugi (the ancient Japanese art of repairing pottery with gold) recreated Leica M3 from JCH? Do you find it ugly or not? (Still: Instagram)

Edited by Al Brown
Link to post
Share on other sites

49 minutes ago, Al Brown said:

How about a kinsugi (the ancient Japanese art of repairing pottery with gold) recreated Leica M3 from JCH? Do you find it ugly or not? (Still: Instagram)

Very nice! 
check out this fully brass edition. Wish I had known about it. 
https://www.google.com/amp/s/leicarumors.com/2019/09/28/new-leica-m10-p-sc-asset-limited-edition-brass-camera.aspx/amp/

Link to post
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, Flu said:

Wouldn’t we then have been having a conversation about what black paint was best to cover up all that brass?

Link to post
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, jdlaing said:

You are very misinformed about the trees here. This is not England. And there is no better or worse wood in any same tree. Only different.

As a cricket enthusiast and a lover of acoustic guitars, I feel compelled to provide a little nuance to this. 
 

Willow for cricket bats. Willow is broadly willow, but the characteristics of grain width change the bat. Similarly consistency of grain. So even in the same tree, there are variances and then from tree to tree, obviously other differences. But as you say, willow is willow and for 99% of cases, no one is the wiser.

Same applies for guitars. For the most part, spruce is spruce. But altitude changes characteristics so too does consistency of pattern in the wood. The resonance will change even  through the same tree. So choosing tone woods is an art and why folks like George Lowden (Lowden guitars) put such focus on choosing right tonewood combinations and the right pieces of wood within the same batch. That’s why Martin, Taylor, Lowden etc all have different series bodies….quality of tonewoods. 
 

In fairness in both examples I’m talking top end examples, but there’s a lot more to it than meets the eye. 
 

Anyway, that’s my horticultural intervention done for the day…..getting back on topic, I do have the BP M10 and won’t be going near it with sandpaper. If it wears it wears, if not, then a useful reminder I’m not using it enough!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Guest BlackBarn

Although admiring the creativity I prefer objects to age gracefully and naturally in the same way I prefer my antiques as opposed to something new being buried a month or so to give it ‘that look’.  The reverse also happens - I’m reminded of the many who decide to give their antique bronzes a nice clean and polish prior to bringing it onto the Antique Road Show followed by the wide eyed ‘what have I done’ look when realising the markets perception of lost value.

 

Edited by BlackBarn
G
Link to post
Share on other sites

On 7/27/2021 at 3:56 PM, 250swb said:

I guess mine is similar

Made in 2002 with Leica using the delicate 'black lacquer' tree sap finish. It's never had a half case or anything and it's been bumped and knocked but not abused. There is some scuffing where the strap rubs which doesn't show in the photo. I can't remember where any of the scratches came from (so no fond memories of use), but I suspect are from stuffing it into my Hadley Pro with lenses and other cameras.

 

The lens is as lovely as the camera! Very Nice Pairing.

Philip.

Link to post
Share on other sites

On 7/27/2021 at 9:25 PM, 250swb said:

But it can be the same for Fender Custom Shop Relic guitars, where Fender use better wood than their mainstream production guitars, far more attention to detail, each really is hand made, and some say the authentic paint finish also adds to the sound if a period sound is what you want. But the Custom Shop guitars can also play better than an off the shelf guitar whatever the specification is...

OK; I know I'm going way off-topic again...

Replicas apart Fender CS is trying to recreate a quality of instrument which didn't really exist across the production line back in the day and so in one sense are on a hiding to nothing but, conversely, are now at liberty to produce some very fine vintage-vibe modern guitars with a Vintage look but modern QC which will be received gratefully by their target market and Good Luck To Them say I!

Gibson's CS division, however, have had a real problem to deal with; their primary objective is - and has been since the early '80s - to recreate the 1959 Les Paul. Their first 'official' '59 R-I came out of the Historic Division (as it was then named) in 1993. It was a superb piece of kit and as close to the real-deal as Gibson could produce at the time. Unfortunately for Gibson their target market is slightly more demanding than is Fender's and this has resulted in a farcical year-on-year "The Closest Yet to the Original!" proclamation.

Numerous changes 'to get back to the historically accurate design' later things pretty much came to a peak when, several years ago now, the Custom Shop returned to using animal-based adhesives to fix the neck ("Long-Tenon" of course!) into the neck-socket. This will probably only really appeal to folk who know what was happening within Gibson at the time and  HAS to be watched with subtitles selected to make any sense in this context;

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mWylKk0Y6PU

Philip.

Edited by pippy
Link to post
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Al Brown said:

How about a kinsugi (the ancient Japanese art of repairing pottery with gold) recreated Leica M3 from JCH? Do you find it ugly or not? (Still: Instagram)

Kinsugi!  Very very cool!  I love it.l

Edited by Stephen.s1
Link to post
Share on other sites

On 7/28/2021 at 6:13 PM, Al Brown said:

How about a kinsugi (the ancient Japanese art of repairing pottery with gold) recreated Leica M3 from JCH? Do you find it ugly or not? (Still: Instagram)

Too bad the plates are not made of pottery. This just creates a strange combination.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...