Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Advertisement (gone after registration)

I prefer to take pictures on overcast days for a variety of reasons.  Unfortunately, by definition that means that there is a threat of rain.  I take along a zip lock bag so that if it starts raining, i can protect the camera.  How concerned should one be about surface water on a film M?  Any other clever ways to protect them from this threat?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I keep a water proof bag along for the ride in case of rain. But I have been hit a number of times with a squall and never had any problems a dry towel couldn't solve. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just take a cloth to dry it with from time to time. The showstopper with wet weather is condensation inside the viewfinder so dry it before putting it away and keep air circulating around the body and don't put a wet camera under your coat. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, StephenH said:

I prefer to take pictures on overcast days for a variety of reasons.  Unfortunately, by definition that means that there is a threat of rain.  I take along a zip lock bag so that if it starts raining, i can protect the camera.  How concerned should one be about surface water on a film M?  Any other clever ways to protect them from this threat?

Minimally. The main  problem with moisture is with digital cameras with their elaborate electronics and (relative) high-power electrical circuits that corrode terminally.

Mechanical cameras are far less susceptible. The mechanics are greased and won't seize up with rust from some rain, electronic exposure meters are usually fairly deep inside the body.  As long as you take reasonable precautions like not totally drenching the camera or mistaking it for a Nikonos you have little to worry about.

Link to post
Share on other sites

M3 ( and Ms before M4-2 ) with autolub brass gears would be my choice for 'rainy days' or rainy parts of our world.

When I used M4-2/P after returning from wet countries, some of the inside parts rusted *, to be replaced when CLAed.

* repair men told me by then

 

Leica M without electronics can stand "wet use" very well, just dry the camera/lens with dry cloth when they are wet.

Putting them in waterproof bag can have some negative effect with condensation on optic parts.

To protect them from rain, I put the combo in plastic bag with large opening under it, not to have condensation problem

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

Advertisement (gone after registration)

On 5/4/2021 at 4:13 AM, jaapv said:

Minimally. The main  problem with moisture is with digital cameras with their elaborate electronics and (relative) high-power electrical circuits that corrode terminally.

Mechanical cameras are far less susceptible. The mechanics are greased and won't seize up with rust from some rain, electronic exposure meters are usually fairly deep inside the body.  As long as you take reasonable precautions like not totally drenching the camera or mistaking it for a Nikonos you have little to worry about.

My M-P 240 has an advertised amount of weather resistance but what good is it if the lens is not weather sealed?

Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, kivis said:

My M-P 240 has an advertised amount of weather resistance but what good is it if the lens is not weather sealed?

Not as good. I just carry a bar towel to wipe off moisture. I have a neoprene camera case for the really cold/soggy days.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It shouldn’t be a problem. Because Leica used to promote using MP (which has some electronics) under rain and under sub zero arctic environments. 
They even showcased the MP as the sole reliable camera for artic or Antarctic expeditions. 
 

So raining should be the least of mechanical Ms concern. 

Link to post
Share on other sites


Leica XU has become my second camera for alpine hiking tours, where the weather changes surprisingly often to rain, thunderstorms or slight blizzards even in summer.
The XU also provides better protection against spray from waterfalls, sailing and rafting tours than any Leica M could ever do.
Especially on tours lasting several weeks, where moisture that has penetrated the sensitive rangefinder cannot be removed immediately.
It is hardly possible to focus precisely with a fogged viewfinder.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, kivis said:

My M-P 240 has an advertised amount of weather resistance but what good is it if the lens is not weather sealed?

According to Leica the lenses havea sufficient amount of weather protection through narrow tolerances and lubrication. The advent of electronics in lenses and cameras has produced a fear of rain that is not justified for mechanical objects that are made of glass and brass.  As my grandmother used to say: "you are not made of sugar" OK. So your mechanical lens will get wet and a bit of moisture works its way inside. What will happen? It will dry out again....

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, nicci78 said:

It shouldn’t be a problem. Because Leica used to promote using MP (which has some electronics) under rain and under sub zero arctic environments. 
They even showcased the MP as the sole reliable camera for artic or Antarctic expeditions. 
 

So raining should be the least of mechanical Ms concern. 

I remember tha Catlin Expedition photographed by Martin HArtley was reportedly shot on am MP but when I read his interview on the trip he said it was a "specially modified" MP, that special modification I recall was to remove all the normal lubricants and re apply something that would stand up to the intense cold in the Polar Regions. He also used some nikon kit D2x I think. https://www.martinhartley.com/galleries/Vault/Leica-Camera

Link to post
Share on other sites

Leica used to offer a "winterizing" service which removed most of the lubrication to prevent the camera from freezing up under extreme cold. It made the camera quite rough to use under normal circumstances and it had to be re-lubricated for normal use. Modern lubricants have made this less necessary, although I imagine that they will still prepare cameras for special extreme use, like polar expeditions, on request.
The lowest I used my M3 in was -45ºC in North Finland in winter. It was not winterized, but it kept going.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
7 minutes ago, jaapv said:

Leica used to offer a "winterizing" service which removed most of the lubrication to prevent the camera from freezing up under extreme cold. It made the camera quite rough to use under normal circumstances and it had to be re-lubricated for normal use. Modern lubricants have made this less necessary, although I imagine that they will still prepare cameras for special extreme use, like polar expeditions, on request.
The lowest I used my M3 in was -45ºC in North Finland in winter. It was not winterized, but it kept going.

Back in the late 1980s I used Canon F1n s in Northern Norway at -20 and lower with no issues, a collegue was using Nikon F3 at the same time and he also had no issues. Neither of us had any special preparations done to the cameras.

 

These days I'd stop working way before those temps. 😄

Edited by Topsy
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 5/3/2021 at 4:24 PM, StephenH said:

I prefer to take pictures on overcast days for a variety of reasons.  Unfortunately, by definition that means that there is a threat of rain.  I take along a zip lock bag so that if it starts raining, i can protect the camera.  How concerned should one be about surface water on a film M?  Any other clever ways to protect them from this threat?

I would say that it is ok to get a mechanical (or even digital too) M camera damp or even wet in drizzle or rain provided that you ensure that it is dried out properly afterward and also that the zip lock/dry bag is thoroughly dried too. I use indicator silica gel which can be bought on eBay and reused if it is dried out after its has absorbed sufficient moisture. If you allow a damp camera or lens to stay in a damp environment - and worse warm and dark - then you risk cousing fungus which can be expensive to remove. So I don't worry about getting cameras damp in the rain because it won't harm them, but I do make sure that they are thoroughly dried out before putting them away afterwards. [My M9 got damp ths morning and has spent the fternoon drying out - its used to it].

Edited by pgk
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

I'm from Oregon, which is known for its rain and all other forms of precipitation, and my M3 has been quite resistant to moisture.  I use the original everready case, and the little time out in the weather for shots doesn't seem to allow much moisture into the camera.  I also open up the case when back indoors to let the camera gently dry out after shooting outside.

Scott

Edited by skucera
typo
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By StephenH
      I've had several problems with my M3 including shutter bounce which have been mitigated but not eliminated  by a CLA.  All of them were manifested in VERTICAL defects visible on the negatives and so were consistent with an abnormality with the shutter opening as the vertical opening is moving across the frame.  This recent defect is HORIZONTAL and appears as an overexposed band on the top of the image (bottom of the negative) and the the bottom of the image, although only the defect at the top of the image is clearly visible here.  It occurred about three times on a 36 exposure roll and neighboring frames shot at the same speed did not have this defect.  It does not appear to be a light leak because the overexposure does not extend past the frame.  Any ideas??

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in to view the hidden content. Hallo Gast! Du willst die Bilder sehen? Einfach registrieren oder anmelden!
    • By StephenH
      Hello guest! Please register or sign in to view the hidden content. Hallo Gast! Du willst die Bilder sehen? Einfach registrieren oder anmelden!Hello guest! Please register or sign in to view the hidden content. Hallo Gast! Du willst die Bilder sehen? Einfach registrieren oder anmelden!About a year ago, I had my M3 CLA'd after sporadic shutter problems caused results like the overexposed bar in the first example.  After about 10 rolls of film, the "bars" are back, (happening once per roll in the last couple of rolls) along with the over exposed "bar" at the far right of the frame shown in the 2nd example which I believe are limited to exposures made with 1/500th or 1/1000th of a second.   The latter problem can actually be seen by dry firing the camera as a bright "slit" on the right edge as the shutter is closing  is observed through the open back.  My question is should this be happening so soon after an CLA?  Is there something inherently irreparable in the shutter mechanism? 
    • By Boreees
      Hi all, 
      Just had my M6 CLA’d due to a light leak around the shutter curtains. They are demonstrating some curling and leave a light leak when a frame is left in the gate for too long. The tech replaces the baffles among other things but I can still see a bit of light at the edges when shining a bright light. He claims that is normal and his other Leicas also have this. Can anyone attest if that is true by checking your shutter curtain edges when shining a bright light inside? 
       
      much obliged
      Boe

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in to view the hidden content. Hallo Gast! Du willst die Bilder sehen? Einfach registrieren oder anmelden!
    • By Boreees
      Hi all, 
      Just had my M6 CLA’d due to a light leak around the shutter curtains. They are demonstrating some curling and leave a light leak when a frame is left in the gate for too long. The tech replaces the baffles among other things but I can still see a bit of light at the edges when shining a bright light. He claims that is normal and his other Leicas also have this. Can anyone attest if that is true by checking your shutter curtain edges when shining a bright light inside? 
       
      much obliged!
       
      Boe
    • By Eric727
      Hi, I’m new here. I am using Canon DSLR and Nikon F3P film camera. I understand that a Leica camera won’t make me a better photographer, but I like the feel after tested the Leica camera at Leica store, and I love the experience of controlling light by myself. I started from DSLR then move to film, my F3 explore my vision of “how to exposure work”, but relying very minimum of the electronic parts inside my F3 (basically just a light meter).
      With all the reasons (maybe excuses), I am decided to become one of the Leica member. Last week, I saw a good deal of 50mm f2 rigid, and my finger acted to quickly and accidentally make up the purchase, now it on the way. 
      I hope I can have some of your suggestions here to help me to pick my first Leica to start my Leica journey.
       
      Currently, I am considering M3, M4 and M5. Based on my search on the web, M3 is legendary camera, M4 is more modern, M5 is cheap & bulky.
      is there anyone who used or owned these camera and probably can give some advise to me?
      I planned to get one film Leica only, afterwards, I will invest into digital Leica.
       
      Thank you very much.
×
×
  • Create New...