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CL - the image thread


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4 hours ago, Boojay said:

Huge congratulations to your Daughter, a very proud moment to capture.   I can well imagine how terrifying those hospital hours were twenty five years ago, and you were indeed lucky to have had such a caring and thorough Doctor.  Nice to see this happy moment.

Thank you, Jayne. At that moment, seeing Ali, again with her pediatrician, and then walking off stage and embrace brought a tear to my eye. I frequently reflect on how fortunate we were those few days, when minutes and seconds made the difference.  To see my daughter go forward and hopefully able to help someone, at some point similarly, keeps all of us in perspective about life.  Rob

4 hours ago, RoySmith said:

Great photo and a Wonderful history to it.

Thank you, Roy.

5 hours ago, wda said:

A very  moving story with more than one moral.

Thank you, David.  My daughter no doubt will "pay it forward".

Edited by ropo54
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1 hour ago, Petercoll said:

Reading Thorsten Overgaard's new E book on Composition, this is fantastic ! Architecture, impact (infrared), storyline ( boats moored up by their boatshed ) and the cow parsley leads your eye around in a curve , highlighting the main topic , and is most engaging to look at as an image. Thank you .

Thank you Peter. The cow parsley is what really does it here. I was lucky to have caught the scene with the plants in full bloom. 

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An overwhelmingly beautiful story, Rob. A hearty mazel tov to you and your family for such accomplishments and, even more importantly, for having the humility and appreciation to know and express what are the most essential things in life. 

Edited by bags27
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18 minutes ago, bags27 said:

An overwhelmingly beautiful story, Rob. A hearty mazel tov to you and your family for such accomplishments and, even more importantly, for having the humility and appreciation to know and express what are the most essential things in life. 

Thank you, Ken.  Rob

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5 hours ago, Boojay said:

Visited my favourite creatures again yesterday.  Just wanted to share these two.  CL and 180R.   First to show why they need to protect young trees in the Deer Park.  Think this big old tree will survive the stripping of its bark guessing it's been there a hundred years or more.  The second image is a huge crop, from original 6000 x 4000 down to around 1500 x 1000, then resized for here, I think I lifted the exposure slightly but other than that nothing.

  I am always very happy with the 180R on the CL, my longest (cheapest) lens, while I wait to see what other L mount options arrive.

 

 

Lovely as always, Jayne. I see that Leica made 8 (!) different R180s. Is this the f/4 version? (Guessing so, since you say it's your cheapest lens.) I see that that version can support the very inexpensive macro adapter, which might be fun.

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1 minute ago, bags27 said:

Lovely as always, Jayne. I see that Leica made 8 (!) different R180s. Is this the f/4 version? (Guessing so, since you say it's your cheapest lens.) I see that that version can support the very inexpensive macro adapter, which might be fun.

No it's a 1978 2.8 version and if I remember correctly I purchased from a dealer for around £300, think it's a no for the macro adaptor though.

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17 minutes ago, Boojay said:

No it's a 1978 2.8 version and if I remember correctly I purchased from a dealer for around £300, think it's a no for the macro adaptor though.

Thanks. According to the wiki, 1978 was the transition year, so could be a v. 1 or 2, but neither appears to the macro adaptor. Either way, for a non-APO version that's a pretty great lens!

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10 hours ago, ropo54 said:

CL w 55/135

Two stories here: This is a picture of my daughter being "capped" at graduation ceremonies from medical school. She is to begin her residency at a hospital next month for the next 3 years in Pennsylvania.  First story: I was sitting in the "nose-bleed" seats, quite a distance from the stage and with the 55/135. Lighting was not particularly good at all, and most of the photos were taken at iso 6400 @ 200mm (135mm). To my incredible surprise, the quality of the photos was superb!  So, big kudos to the 55/135 and the CL.

Second story, and this puts the photo in more perspective.  The gentleman "capping" her was her pediatrician, who some 25 years earlier had saved her life, by responding to the hospital in the middle of the night to care for her!  She had been running a fever of 105, with vomiting, for several hours after coming home from school. At 7pm, the pediatrician returned a call and told us to call him at home at 11 pm to give him an update.With her high fever and vomiting continuing still at 11 pm he told us to go to the hospital, and he would be in touch with the ER physician. Blood work was done and IV fluids were given.  At 2 a.m. the ER physician told us that "he would have sent us home" but the pediatrician was "making him" admit her (actual words).  At 4 am, upon arrival with the floor nurse her blood pressure was starting to drop, and by 4:30 a.m. our pediatrician rushed to hospital to her bedside to examine her. Immediately upon seeing some 'spots' developing on her abdomen, his face blanched, and he said "Let's go!" and he and I just grabbed her bed and wheeled her up to ICU floor, where we were in a race against time to see whether 'they' could get IV antibiotics into her fast enough to counter the meningococcemia that had invaded her blood stream.  For 3 days, we would not know if she would make it: it was a race against time. Would the ravages of the bacteria have wrought enough destruction to her organs and killed her before the antibiotics could kill the meningococcemia? (I won't go into the details of meningococcemia, suffice it to say it will often kill within hours of being diagnosed, or leave one with significant impairments from brain damage, loss of limbs, to other tragic results).

When my daughter called her pediatrician after not having spoken to him in many, many years to ask if he would accept the honor of "capping" her, he cried on the phone. We reconnected for the first time in many, many years today. He had certainly never forgotten my daughter, and had thought often about her case over the years.  But for his being an 'old-school' medical doctor, my daughter would have died within hours. (We did not deal with an answering service, no response, or a nurse covering his calls, telling us to 'come in in the morning if she's still sick', etc. . . . )

A fabulous personal moment, and context to the photo. A very special man and doctor. Rob

Such a beautiful story - thank you for sharing!

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On 5/16/2019 at 3:08 PM, Jake said:

I wonder if the expression "Get off my lawn!" is international. If not, it's the reflection of a cranky old man. Don't get me started on the ubiquitousness of image making devices. . . 

Sorry to have interrupted this thread. And with that, I submit the following : 

Nod to david in wales for the black trim. 

I must be dense but I don’t get it😳

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Quote

"You kids get off my lawn!" is an American expression of the late 20th century and early 21st century. Slight variations include "Get off my lawn!" and "You kids get out of my yard!" are common. This phrase presents the supposed reaction of a stereotypical elderly middle-class homeowner confronting boisterous children entering or crossing his or her property. Today, the phrase has been expanded to mock any sort of trivial or petty complaint, particularly those of older people regarding the young.

From wiki. I was mocking myself. I'm oldish. But from what I see here, not quite the the median. . . )

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8 hours ago, albert said:

Old Dogface    18-56

Thanks Much you two. I’m so enamored with myself that I thought maybe 20 likes should be expected. 🕺🕺🤪

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On 5/16/2019 at 7:07 PM, Boojay said:

My beautiful county CL 40mm CV  Shots taken at the top of Grinshill, a lot of the local youngsters walk up here on nice evenings to hang out and watch the sunset.

 

Beautiful! Love them both!

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  • jaapv changed the title to CL - the image thread
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