Jump to content

Nicht immer nur Kaviar ... (English Version)


Recommended Posts

Advertisement (gone after registration)

Kemper Kombi from the mid 1890s. One of the first all metal cameras. It was also a Graphoscope for viewing developed transparencies. The little door at the back opens to let in light for viewing. Note the patent date of 20 December 1892 engraved at the back. The camera is tiny and I will post another photo showing it beside a Leica for scale. It was not a commercial success and the Box Brownie followed along soon afterwards to conquer the consumer market. Technical details here for those that want them: http://www.submin.com/large/collection/kombi/introduction.htm

Welcome, dear visitor! As registered member you'd see an image here…

Simply register for free here – We are always happy to welcome new members!

 

The spring operated shutter is a hoot. You need to stick a finger in front of the lens when setting the shutter.

William

  • Like 9
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Size Comparison between Kemper Kombi and Leica I Model A.

Welcome, dear visitor! As registered member you'd see an image here…

Simply register for free here – We are always happy to welcome new members!

William 

  • Like 11
Link to post
Share on other sites

54 minutes ago, willeica said:

Does it have a device for unlocking the winding spool before winding on? This was intended to avoid double exposures. My father's Super Baldina and my Welta Weltini from the late 1930s both have this feature. In the case of the Welta the winding spool actually cocks the shutter as well.

I am not sure what you mean by "device", but the camera cannot make accidental double exposures (and maybe not on purpose either - or at least I don't know how). Maybe below answers your question:

It is not a convenient camera because it has a non-returning mirror and is a pain to load, but it is relatively simple to use.

The following happens when you wind the film forward to the next frame: 
1 The camera lowers a black light trap positioned under the lifted mirror - to cover the filmgate.
2. The mirror is then moved to its lower position.
3. At the same time the compur shutter is tensioned
4. The shutter blades opens.
5. The aperture iris is opened.

It is now possible to view and focus through the finder. The selenium meter (which works) can give you a LV value you can transfer to the lens - shutter speed and aperture is linked to EV.

When you press the shutter release button
1 The shutter closes.
2 The aperture closes to the selected value
3 The mirror moves up
4 The black light trap moves up under the mirror
5 The shutter opens for the selected duration and closes.
6 The camera is basically locked up until you advance your film again.

It is a lot of mechanical linkage and complexity in a camera that was originally intended for amateurs -  but then again, I don't think it was cheap in its day. I am surprised that it still works - there is a lot that can go wrong.

The focusing screen is beautiful. It has rounded "television" corners. Like the Leicaflex, you can only focus in the center but everything is bright.

Link to post
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, nitroplait said:

I am not sure what you mean by "device", but the camera cannot make accidental double exposures (and maybe not on purpose either - or at least I don't know how). Maybe below answers your question:

It is not a convenient camera because it has a non-returning mirror and is a pain to load, but it is relatively simple to use.

The following happens when you wind the film forward to the next frame: 
1 The camera lowers a black light trap positioned under the lifted mirror - to cover the filmgate.
2. The mirror is then moved to its lower position.
3. At the same time the compur shutter is tensioned
4. The shutter blades opens.
5. The aperture iris is opened.

It is now possible to view and focus through the finder. The selenium meter (which works) can give you a LV value you can transfer to the lens - shutter speed and aperture is linked to EV.

When you press the shutter release button
1 The shutter closes.
2 The aperture closes to the selected value
3 The mirror moves up
4 The black light trap moves up under the mirror
5 The shutter opens for the selected duration and closes.
6 The camera is basically locked up until you advance your film again.

It is a lot of mechanical linkage and complexity in a camera that was originally intended for amateurs -  but then again, I don't think it was cheap in its day. I am surprised that it still works - there is a lot that can go wrong.

The focusing screen is beautiful. It has rounded "television" corners. Like the Leicaflex, you can only focus in the center but everything is bright.

My friend Tony Hurst, who I mentioned above, has one of those Contaflex cameras and I must look at it when it is possible to visit him again after lockdown. The Welta which I have has a button which must be pressed before you can wind the film forward. The turning sprocket wheel, as the film is wound, then actually cocks the shutter. In effect, the moving film cocks the shutter as you cannot do this with no film in the camera. You also need to set the shutter speed on the Compur rim. Without going through the process you cannot actually expose a frame which avoids double exposures. What is easy to do, however, is to think that you have exposed a frame when you have not and then to wind on, giving rise to missed frames. The Super Baldina has something similar, but not quite the same. It is all something of a 'tea ceremony' which certainly slows you down for more considered photography. In the case of the Contaflex you have an even more complicated camera because of the mirror mechanism. 

I will post a photo some day of my small folder cameras with Compur shutters, some of which have Leitz lenses. They are all different in the way that they work.

William

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to put this in.   Not rare, not too valuable......but as a Camera, with an important place in photographic history.  The Nikon F, when it was introduced in 1959, became the standard that All other SLRs has to compete with.  Rock solid, dependable and capable of image perfection.   This one was built in 1969.

Welcome, dear visitor! As registered member you'd see an image here…

Simply register for free here – We are always happy to welcome new members!

Edited by Ambro51
  • Like 10
Link to post
Share on other sites

A couple of cameras I was given. The Baldinette belonged to a friend who later moved on to 1970’s Exactas. The Ensign came from my aunt.

Welcome, dear visitor! As registered member you'd see an image here…

Simply register for free here – We are always happy to welcome new members!

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

Advertisement (gone after registration)

1 hour ago, Ambro51 said:

I have to put this in.   Not rare, not too valuable......but as a Camera, with an important place in photographic history...

Funnily enough I was going to post this snap with the others earlier but became bogged-down with work.

This one is a '69 example. I've had this pairing since 1978 and used it alongside my M2 throughout my student days in the mid-'80s. It's currently loaded with XP-2;

Welcome, dear visitor! As registered member you'd see an image here…

Simply register for free here – We are always happy to welcome new members!

Philip.

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome, dear visitor! As registered member you'd see an image here…

Simply register for free here – We are always happy to welcome new members!

same Nikon, different lens mounted and the 2/50 Nikkor used as taking-lens on a Sony

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Pyrogallol said:

A couple of cameras I was given. The Baldinette belonged to a friend who later moved on to 1970’s Exactas. The Ensign came from my aunt.

Welcome, dear visitor! As registered member you'd see an image here…

Simply register for free here – We are always happy to welcome new members!

 Love that Baldinette. Here is my father's Super Baldina. I have the bill of sale for it from January 1940.

William

 

 

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Ambro51 said:

I have to put this in.   Not rare, not too valuable......but as a Camera, with an important place in photographic history.  The Nikon F, when it was introduced in 1959, became the standard that All other SLRs has to compete with.  Rock solid, dependable and capable of image perfection.   This one was built in 1969.

Welcome, dear visitor! As registered member you'd see an image here…

Simply register for free here – We are always happy to welcome new members!

 

1 hour ago, pippy said:

Funnily enough I was going to post this snap with the others earlier but became bogged-down with work.

This one is a '69 example. I've had this pairing since 1978 and used it alongside my M2 throughout my student days in the mid-'80s. It's currently loaded with XP-2;

Philip.

The Nikon F was one of the most significant cameras in the history of photography along with some of the Kodaks and Leicas and other models. Here are some from my collection, from left to right, Front Row, Leica I Model A and M3, Back Row, Vest Pocket Kodak , Nikon F, Rolleiflex E and Beau Brownie.,

 

William

  • Like 9
Link to post
Share on other sites

The Nikon F was based on the earlier Nikon rangefinder cameras, with a pentaprism added on top.

This is one of my two Nikon S bodies. Having the covering replaced. It was then rebuilt by my Leica repair man, who said it was a nightmare because of the condition it was in when he opened it up. He replaced the worn out shutter blinds with modified Leica blinds.

Welcome, dear visitor! As registered member you'd see an image here…

Simply register for free here – We are always happy to welcome new members!

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

51 minutes ago, willeica said:

...Here are some from my collection, from left to right, Front Row, Leica I Model A and M3, Back Row, Vest Pocket Kodak , Nikon F, Rolleiflex E and Beau Brownie...

Wonderful group shot, William!

Purely out of curiosity have you used your 50 / f1.5 Summarit much? I only ask because I used my recently-acquired one for the majority of my snaps during last month and was, contrary to practcally everything I had read previously about these lenses, astonished by just how sharp and...well...perfectly normal it performed at any aperture from f2.8 down.

Philip.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

As I'm late for the Contax II and the Nikon F, let's show another among my favorites.

I was in a perfume factory in Grasse (South of France), when I took a picture of the bottles and essences there. In that moment, a girl that was attending to the guide said "Hasselblad" just before turning back and have a look at the camera. Not specially quiet but a very special sound indeed.

Take care,

Augusto

 

Welcome, dear visitor! As registered member you'd see an image here…

Simply register for free here – We are always happy to welcome new members!

Edited by tranquilo67
  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

vor 4 Minuten schrieb zeitz:

Clearly an Astro-Berlin lens in rare white finish with an added brass adapter.  What focal length is that lens? 

500 mm, someone recycled the Lens and swapped the original Adapter to a home-made Nikon-mount.

Edited by romanus53
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Who built the First still Camera to use sprocketed 35 mm film?   Well, we all here on the Leica forum love to think our Hero Oskar Barnack was First.   But....way back in 1898, only three years after the film was available to the public, Danish Artist and Inventor Vilhelm Pacht Set himself to the task.   Assisting him was Danish engineer Jacob Earlhammer (who designed a helicopter in 1901).   Together, they devised the “ Photomachine”.  It rests today, mostly forgotten by photo historians, in a Danish Museum.  Todd Gustavson, with the Eastman House, who knows a thing or two about the early  Photography, never heard of this.  I was able, with the help of a curator taking pictures of the original.....to build a fully working replica.   Simple, yet complicated. It advances the film by a cord pull, at the same time cocking the shutter.  The original used a pneumatic bulb for shutter release, I chose to put a “normal” shutter release on.   •••••. Pacht did not realize the importance of his invention, it was never patented or mass produced.    He used the 24x36mm format.  Top image is my replica, below, the 1898 original.

Welcome, dear visitor! As registered member you'd see an image here…

Simply register for free here – We are always happy to welcome new members!

As you see, the lens is missing on the original.   This was a Zeiss Planar f 3.6

The “wire” near the top is where the sprockets run.  You can hear the film advancing by “clicks”.  Barnack didn’t do this with the UR, leaving knowing the film was indeed advancing an uncertain proposition.  This photo was taken during my build, the cord which cocks the shutter not yet installed.  That goes from the “toothed” wheel wraps around the left film chamber and attaches to the cocking lever.  I was uncertain exactly What shutter type Pacht used, I put on a 1931 Compur 00 with a Zeiss 60 mm f 3.5 Tessar.   It is non focusing.  Images of the original appear to show a focus ability, but not being certain how he did it, I settled on a f 3.5 focus of 16 feet.   Depth of field does the rest.Vilhelm Pacht. The Inventor of the 35mm Camera.  His paintings were of mostly landscapes, interestingly they were a 3X4 basis.  Did he use the camera to create images he later painted?  We’re not sure, and according to the Museum Curator in Denmark, there do not seem to be any surviving negatives yet identified.  Being Nitrate film may account for this. 

And Yes, it takes Pictures!!

Edited by Ambro51
  • Like 7
  • Thanks 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

54 minutes ago, pippy said:

Wonderful group shot, William!

Purely out of curiosity have you used your 50 / f1.5 Summarit much? I only ask because I used my recently-acquired one for the majority of my snaps during last month and was, contrary to practcally everything I had read previously about these lenses, astonished by just how sharp and...well...perfectly normal it performed at any aperture from f2.8 down.

Philip.

Yes, I have used mainly my M version and it is excellent, just behind a current Summilux which is one of the best lenses I have ever used. I also have 2 LTM versions, one with a T, T &H engraving and another later one. All seem fine, but the LTMs have some minor issues that will see them going for a CLA once Covid is under control.

William

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

34 minutes ago, tranquilo67 said:

...I was in a perfume factory in Grasse (South of France), when I took a picture of the bottles and essences there. In that moment, a girl that was attending to the guide said "Hasselblad" just before turning back and have a look at the camera. Not specially quiet but a very special sound indeed...

Wonderful story, Augusto. Thanks for sharing it with us here!

I like the metering knob as seen on your example!

Philip.

Edited by pippy
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Seeing the Contaflex  IV and Canon  Ftb here.....I have to admit that these were the Only cameras I got so sick of trying to get to work, both were thrown out with the garbage.   Zeiss= having 20 frail parts trying to do the work of 2.    Absolutely NOT worth the kings ransom a tech would charge to fix them.

Edited by Ambro51
Link to post
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, Ambro51 said:

Canon  Ftb here.....I have to admit that these were the Only cameras I got so sick of trying to get to work

I had unending trouble with sticking diaphragms on my Canon FX.  I swore then only to buy Leica and Nikon cameras.  I have stuck with this pledge ever since.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...