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Cromatic Aberration


OHW
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I have read on a local Danish chat site that many people struggle with Cromatic Aberration on many of Leica's SL lenses. The SL24-90 zoom is particularly bad. Can it be confirmed in this forum? Is it the AWB that is creating the problem?

Edited by OHW
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11 hours ago, OHW said:

I have read on a local Danish chat site that many people struggle with Cromatic Aberration on many of Leica's SL lenses. The SL24-90 zoom is particularly bad. Can it be confirmed in this forum? Is it the AWB that is creating the problem?

I've never encountered this problem with the SL 24-90mm & I've used it extensively in a variety of challenging lighting situations on the S1R, SL, SL2 as well as the CL. 

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11 hours ago, mikaelrydenfelt said:

Based on my experience (SL24-90 couple years ago and SL50mm F1.4 still nowadays) that sounds odd. In my use, different situations in photojournalism, I have not seen any CA. 

+1 use the 24-90 and 50 Summilux regularly wide open and note never any CA. I use Capture One, Affinity and sometimes Aurora.

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SL2 + Vario Elmarit SL 24-90mm. Exif: 1/250s f/3.5 ISO100 24mm. Filformat DNG

 

Edited by OHW
The photographer does not want the photo published. He does not want to create a problem for Leica which may not be significant. I'll stop the thread here!
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The higher resolving and micro-contrasty a lens-sensor combination is,  the more residual (longitudinal) chromatic aberration can become visible in high-contrast situations.This means that the "sharper" a lens/sensor is, the more visible it will be.

This applies to all lenses of all brands, obviously APO lenses are less affected .

For this reason the better postprocessing  programs will have correction for both lateral (red-green fringing) and  longitudinal (purple-blue) aberration.

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vor 3 Minuten schrieb Chun Wah LAM:

Being an amateur, can someone enlighten me what’s wrong with the colour at circled areas. Shot with SL2-S + APO SL 35mm f4.5, 1/1000 sec, AWB, ISO 100. Thanks.

Looks like moire to me.

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30 minutes ago, Chun Wah LAM said:

Thank you. I thought APO is invincible.

Moiré's not caused by a failing in your lens, it's caused by the absence of an Anti-Aliasing (AA) filter that's absent because Leica's aim is to maximise resolution so it's a trade-off.  Either don't add an AA filter over the sensor and capture maximum detail with occasional Moiré or add an AA filter to never get Moiré and sacrifice detail in every picture taken.

Aliasing occurs when there are tight, repeating patterns in the object, the sensor's resolution is similar to the pitch of the pattern and the sensor can't quite decide whether the pixel (sensel) should be red or green and it figuratively flips a coin.  As the pattern in the object repeats the coin flipping does too the red/green Moiré pattern results. 

Moiré's easily fixed in most raw conversion software.

Pete.

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1 hour ago, farnz said:

Moiré's not caused by a failing in your lens, it's caused by the absence of an Anti-Aliasing (AA) filter that's absent because Leica's aim is to maximise resolution so it's a trade-off.  Either don't add an AA filter over the sensor and capture maximum detail with occasional Moiré or add an AA filter to never get Moiré and sacrifice detail in every picture taken.

Aliasing occurs when there are tight, repeating patterns in the object, the sensor's resolution is similar to the pitch of the pattern and the sensor can't quite decide whether the pixel (sensel) should be red or green and it figuratively flips a coin.  As the pattern in the object repeats the coin flipping does too the red/green Moiré pattern results. 

Moiré's easily fixed in most raw conversion software.

Pete.

Moire is also eliminated as resolution increases. An SL2 may not exhibit moire in the same photo. 

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3 hours ago, Chun Wah LAM said:

Thank you. I thought APO is invincible.

Actually, if you have a less sharp lens, it would “fix” the problem 🤣

The problem is that your lens out resolves the sensor and there is high frequency content in the image that is higher than what the sensor can capture so you get moire which is a photographic term for aliasing. An anti-aliasing filter is what is normally put in front of the sensor to prevent such problem but that basically just blurs the image before it hits the sensor.

Lightroom does have the ability to get rid of moire.

Edited by beewee
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