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Film is dead.  Send your film Leicas to me and I will dispose of them properly. 

I would say sell them not because 'film is dead' but precisely because of the opposite! There are so many people getting into film nowadays that the price of good film cameras is constantly spiraling upwards - dizzyingly so, in the case of Leica cameras.  So do film-enthusiasts a favor and don't sit on unused cameras - they should be out there being used, not gathering dust on a shelf.

@PeterMM1  I say keep your film Leicas, especially since you do not need the money that selling them would bring.  Pre-owned film M camera prices/values have gone up over the years, not down. Regarding the "film is dead" shtick, I heard that for the first time in June of 1997.  Now it's January, 2021 and B&H photo has 181 different versions of 35mm film for sale, while Freestyle Photo has 177 different versions of 35mm film for sale.  Given those facts, it doesn't sound to me like

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Kodak Alaris may be British in nationality but nothing is manufactured in UK. It is still dépendant of US factory. 
Film photography is a subtract of film for motion pictures. 
The day when Hollywood will stop buying film to Eastman Kodak. Alaris will have nothing to sell. Or the cost of manufacturing will skyrocket instantly. 
Film photography alone is not sustainable. It needs its bigger brother the movie industry. 

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That might be correct to some extend, but not for example for slide (reversal) film. This isn’t produced for Hollywood, this is mainly for us amateurs.

So it is still amazing that Kodak did launch that high risk project named „Ektachrome 100“ for such a small and volatile market, even producing 16mm and Super8 besides 135.

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Posted (edited)
On 6/24/2021 at 6:21 PM, Helge said:

That might be correct to some extend, but not for example for slide (reversal) film. This isn’t produced for Hollywood, this is mainly for us amateurs.

So it is still amazing that Kodak did launch that high risk project named „Ektachrome 100“ for such a small and volatile market, even producing 16mm and Super8 besides 135.

You should check the reality before spreading false information :

https://www.kodak.com/en/motion/products/camera-films?color-or-black-white=color&film-type=reversal

Hollywood uses : negative & reversal films in colour and B&W

No Hollywood huge orders = no more film photography. 
 

Every Kodak motion pictures films products https://www.kodak.com/en/motion/products/camera-films

Edited by nicci78
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You should check real life before believing simple advertisements 😉

Might be that for some experimental purposes even professional film makers would use reversal film (might be for creating the „real“ amateur type film look), however not for production of movies, this is usually all negative material (and for sure no small format like 16mm 😀, but 35mm or 70mm).

The picture shows basically the offer for semi professionals and ambitious amateurs, however even those use about 90% (if not more) only negative, because almost none of them is using the results for a direct projection, almost all to be scanned.

Even for Super8 the sales of negative film is by far outcasting reversal, and in Super8 there are ~95% of the amateurs.

So, reversal is made by Kodak really almost only for amateurs like us, it’s meaning for any professional usage is close to zero.

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  • 3 weeks later...
13 hours ago, ellegant said:

Don't forget to regularly exercise the shutters!

Good advice, I am not shooting much 35mm film these days but regularly put a used roll through my Ms and for that matter my Canon F1n. Mechanical things like exercise and I think using a blank film gives the whole camera a work out includint the take up mechanism and rewind.

 

Now in England we have no legal Covid restrictions I may well start to get more 35mm shooting done.

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How did you replace the red dot? ...

I would keep all cameras unless you are in need of $... But Leica is as much an investment as you can get now-days....gold, land and Leica's. jim

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I have bought and then sold several film cameras. I have and still regret selling everyone of them. Having said that i appreciate that if you are not using them, now might be a good time to sell them to a good home (user).

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I sold my M2 in 1997 to fund an M6. It had some peculiar strong wear and tear, including a stongly bumped top. And it had that special L-seal.

Yesterday at a camera store I saw my ‘uggie’ from the past again. A second hand. My heart missed a beat. It was my companion for 35 years. 

Should I consider buying it back? I think so … even though I sold my film Canons due to non-usage.

- What should I or can I do in this digital age with a film camera, the scans are mostly medocre . .  . Or I could add a slide copier to the lot?

 

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1 hour ago, Alberti said:

I sold my M2 in 1997 to fund an M6. It had some peculiar strong wear and tear, including a stongly bumped top. And it had that special L-seal.

Yesterday at a camera store I saw my ‘uggie’ from the past again. A second hand. My heart missed a beat. It was my companion for 35 years. 

Should I consider buying it back? I think so … even though I sold my film Canons due to non-usage.

- What should I or can I do in this digital age with a film camera, the scans are mostly medocre . .  . Or I could add a slide copier to the lot?

 

Gosh.

I sold (traded) a very much loved Zeiss Ikon Super Ikonta IV to fund a Rolleiflex 2.8E back in 89. The Super Ikonta was given to me by my auntie when my uncle passed (early 80’s). He wanted me to have the camera as explained to me (by my auntie). That Ikonta was with me everywhere I travelled both as a professional and tourist. Still have all my negs and trannys.

Some 32 years forward and at my LFCS a Zeiss Ikon Super Ikonta III Tessar T* in excellent condition (case, hood) and snapped it up.

Personally I would buy.

The story behind the provenance of such a treasured item - you found an object that you once owned.

 

This in itself (should not be) the best reason.

 

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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, Alberti said:

- What should I or can I do in this digital age with a film camera, the scans are mostly medocre . .  . Or I could add a slide copier to the lot?

Not a slide copier. Add a proper scanner. 
In this day and age of digital perfection, the grain of a B/W film or the slightly inaccurate colours of a scanned slide feel like a breath of fresh air. 

Edited by Vlad Soare
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Posted (edited)

Why not just using the results of an analog camera also analog?

I‘m still making B/W prints at a friend’s house and I‘m still running several slide projectors (from 8x11mm, this however rarely, to 35mm and up to 6x6cm). The only need for scanning is sharing results with someone far away…

Edited by Helge
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Good point @Helge

I find myself oscillating between film and digital. Twice I have sold off film bodies, scanners and film only to buy again after a year. For me I love the process of shooting with an M2, the heft, simplicity  and thickness of body are perfect, but I’m not particularly keen on developing the film due to time constraints. I purchased a M262 M-D thinking it would be the one, but it felt bigger and I was more precious with it than I am with my M2. Maybe a beat up M9 may be the answer for me or an m10-d in ten years....

After selling my m6 ttl I picked up a Ricoh GR (apsc version) and it really inspired me to get out and take photos which is the most important thing. My current camera list is a grii, griii and m2 which gives me both the analogue experience when I want it and digital instant gratification when I don’t. 

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On 6/24/2021 at 1:16 PM, mub said:

you don't sell a Leica.

Unless you are young and need the money 😉

This is so true. I was young - moving up in the newspaper business and sold the entire lot. I don't miss the bodies -------- it's the lenses that I really miss. But when "you are young and need the money" you have few options.

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On 1/25/2021 at 2:38 AM, PeterMM1 said:

I have an M2, M3 both in excellent condition and a mint  Silver M6TTL with a black logo dot....:)
I just don't care for the the red dot and also replaced the red dot on my M8.
Unfortunately DAG said he has run out of black dot logos and can't get them anymore, but I digress....

I don't shoot film anymore. I love my original M Monochrom CCD and my M8 & M10. 
I don't need to sell anything but was wondering if I should just hold on the them. Is it likely that they will increase in value or is film dead?
 

There are loads of folks out there looking for good condition film Leicas, I'd say if you are not going to use them sell them on to someone who will use them.

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