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Papab

Touching up my M10-P?

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Just received my first ever Leica today and its in pristine condition apart from a slight thin bit of wear along the bottom edge of the base plate.

I was thinking of touching it up with an enamel touch up pen? Anyone any advise on this please?

I guess I could buy the hand grip or buy another base plate but its actually quit a small mark, its just that I like my stuff to be pristine.

It actually looks worse than it is in this image becuase its at macro level.

Also I use reading glasses but not distance ones, so would I need a correction lens?  My reading glasses are 2.5.

 

Kind Regards  Stay Safe

 

Papab

Edited by Papab

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27 minutes ago, Papab said:

I was thinking of touching it up with an enamel touch up pen? Anyone any advise on this please?

Yes.  Don't do it.  Unless this is something with which you have experience you'll likely make it look worse.  A camera with a bit of wear on it just make it look like you make photographs :)  A camera with an obvious touch up looks ugly.

Also I use reading glasses but not distance ones, so would I need a correction lens?

This is best determined by looking through the camera.

 

 

 

 

Edited by Good To Be Retired

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I would be quite reluctant to use paint...paint can/does chip.  Small chips may then work their way into the internal workings of the camera.  Plus it looks ugly I feel.

How about trying a black Sharpie?

OR as you suggest, utilize a new grip.  I like the looks and function of the Leica grip on my M10.

Let us know what you do and good luck with your choice.

Edited by m410

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Could get a new base plate. Though a grip might be more worthwhile. I'd just use a sharpie - I've done so on some of my lenses for more distracting paint loss that bothers me enough. And the marks disappear (can still be seen at some angles, but less eye catching). Anyway that paint loss is at the front of the camera. With you shooting at the back of it it'll more or less be a case of out of sight out of mind, especially with the sharpie solution. 

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I appreciate the desire to have perfection with a new and expensive camera.

I’d just touch it up with a black sharpie and go take pictures.  The first scratch is always the worst...hopefully you can learn to live with it :)

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...or - leave the plate alone and buy a case (or half-case). That way your camera has a better chance of avoiding any more ‘damage’. 

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New base plate will cost you 250. Up to you to see if it’s worth it. 

Edited by Steven

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Don’t try! You will never blend the paint, or sharpie to whatever you use! Whatever you do will look wrong! Either you let the wear be the story of the camera (there will be more marks) or, if you want “perfect” (which I understand) buy a new base plate. I get your concern, the camera is gorgeous ... worth the money to buy a new base plate in my view!

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In cases like this I tend to use a Sharpie - it is nearly invisible and not permanent.  After a while, when the sharpie has worn off, it'll blend in with the general wear of the camera.

Whether you need a correction lens is most easily determined by visiting a optician and using his try-out lenses. The best correction is when you are able to see sharp at 2m meter and are able to accommodate beyond that distance.

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Sharpie doesnt work well. Its ok in dim light but in daylight it will have a weird cheap reflection. 

I would also buy the base plate. It will make you feel good. 

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2 hours ago, jaapv said:

The shine is OK if you rub it with a bit of nose grease after it dries.

I've never seen nose grease offered for sale.  If I don't grease my nose properly will it squeak when I sneeze?

Pete.

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11 minutes ago, farnz said:

I've never seen nose grease offered for sale.  If I don't grease my nose properly will it squeak when I sneeze?

Pete.

I use multigrade oil for mine. Protects in both hot and cold weather.

Ernst

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2 hours ago, farnz said:

I've never seen nose grease offered for sale.  If I don't grease my nose properly will it squeak when I sneeze?

Pete.

 

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52 minutes ago, Good To Be Retired said:

Believe it or not, I actually ordered some of this stuff last week.  

For the dog though, not me :)

y'never know... you might scratch your base plate...

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Personally I’d leave it, I don’t think it would be easy to hide and at the end of the day they’re made for shooting with and ‘battle scars’ are all part of the story. 

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On 1/22/2021 at 4:47 PM, Papab said:

 was thinking of touching it up with an enamel touch up pen? Anyone any advise on this please?

I was once in the exact situation as you too with the difference that I personally scratched the bottom plate during the first weeks of use because my jacket had a really rough metal zipper which I didn't think about when letting the camera hang around my neck. It is not surprising that I wanted to touch it up too. Personally, I have no problem with battle scars because they're, in essence, memories of certain moments you had with your camera which makes me embrace them even more but man, it still hurt knowing that the camera was just a few weeks old. It still is a difference if you are responsible for the scars or if someone else made them. Well, back to topic.

I got enamel paint from a friend soon afterwards, namely the RAL 9011/Mat black #8 from Revell and lightly brushed the spots with it. Luckily, the difference between the paint and the original colour wasn't noticeable and I'd recommend that but I'm not sure if that paint is appropriate for such tasks due to it being made for models which are usually made of plastic. The colour brushed off after some uses and I didn't paint it again. Maybe I didn't wait long enough for the paint to dry correctly, I don't know. You can give that a try though, maybe it works for you since its a rather small spot and you wont brush it off with your hands.

 

On 1/22/2021 at 4:47 PM, Papab said:

Also I use reading glasses but not distance ones, so would I need a correction lens?  My reading glasses are 2.5.

To my knowledge, the rangefinder patch is calibrated to +1m.

Edited by feelssadman

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27 minutes ago, feelssadman said:

 

To my knowledge, the rangefinder patch is calibrated to +1m.

We are not talking about patch calibration here.

It's built at "virtual 2m" that the viewfinder (and RF patch) of Leica M must be acutely seen .

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