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jmahto

Film and painting

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After scanning my last year’s Ektachrome slide (with BEOON and M240) I was looking at zoomed in pic and noticed that slightly blurred grain level zoom looks a bit like water color painting.

Whatever it looks like, it is certainly way different than zoomed in look of a digital sensor. 
 

(Leica IIIc, Redscale 5cm Elmar, Ektachrome E100)

Edited by jmahto

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That is how slightly mushy film grain can look. Maybe the watercolour effect is exaggerated by the colours being 'impressionistic', look to see if there's something like a button to press in Lightroom called 'Auto Color' (just a guess as I don't use it)?

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17 hours ago, jmahto said:

After scanning my last year’s Ektachrome slide (with BEOON and M240) I was looking at zoomed in pic and noticed that slightly blurred grain level zoom looks a bit like water color painting.

Whatever it looks like, it is certainly way different than zoomed in look of a digital sensor. 
 

(Leica IIIc, Redscale 5cm Elmar, Ektachrome E100)

I find focussing the M240 using live view and magnification not too precise. Easier on a B&W negative than colour.

Out of interest, what lens are you using on the BEOON? 

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45 minutes ago, Steve Ricoh said:

I find focussing the M240 using live view and magnification not too precise. Easier on a B&W negative than colour.

Out of interest, what lens are you using on the BEOON? 

I am using Schneider Componon-S 2.8/50. I didn't have any issue in focusing. I focus wide then close to f8. I can get sharp image of grain, dust, scratch.

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24 minutes ago, jmahto said:

I am using Schneider Componon-S 2.8/50. I didn't have any issue in focusing. I focus wide then close to f8. I can get sharp image of grain, dust, scratch.

It’s annoying for me that I use the same lens as you and cannot acquire focus because the vertical adjustment of the column “bottoms” just as it appears focus is going in the right direction. I use the tubes exactly as described in the instructions for a 50mm camera lens. Given the problem I’ve just described I use a 50mm Summilux.

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4 minutes ago, Steve Ricoh said:

It’s annoying for me that I use the same lens as you and cannot acquire focus because the vertical adjustment of the column “bottoms” just as it appears focus is going in the right direction. I use the tubes exactly as described in the instructions for a 50mm camera lens. Given the problem I’ve just described I use a 50mm Summilux.

I think we had this discussion before. Need to search. The focus limit for this lens is the bottom surface. Slides are kept on top of the holder and that is not a problem. I scan negative directly on top of the light pad (sometimes even in sleeves) without negative holder and that works too. If you put negatives in holder then you need to put them on top of the bottom rectangle and raise the column. 

I have summilux too but I was never satisfied with corner sharpness even at f8.

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2 minutes ago, jmahto said:

I think we had this discussion before. Need to search. The focus limit for this lens is the bottom surface. Slides are kept on top of the holder and that is not a problem. I scan negative directly on top of the light pad (sometimes even in sleeves) without negative holder and that works too. If you put negatives in holder then you need to put them on top of the bottom rectangle and raise the column. 

I have summilux too but I was never satisfied with corner sharpness even at f8.

Yes I remember this being said, but couldn’t remember it was you that said it.
This works for me too: “If you put negatives in holder then you need to put them on top of the bottom rectangle and raise the column.”

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The issue with using an enlarging lens with the BEOON is that the physical distance from the optical node to the mounting flange of an enlarging lens and that of a Leica camera lens are not the same. So the length of extension tubes printed on the BEOON will not work with an enlarging lens. And since there is no easy way to determine that physical length of the enlarging lens a workable length of extension tubes can only be determined by trial and error.

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1 hour ago, Doug A said:

The issue with using an enlarging lens with the BEOON is that the physical distance from the optical node to the mounting flange of an enlarging lens and that of a Leica camera lens are not the same. So the length of extension tubes printed on the BEOON will not work with an enlarging lens. And since there is no easy way to determine that physical length of the enlarging lens a workable length of extension tubes can only be determined by trial and error.

What you’ve said should be a warning printed large using upper case. I listened to others who reported success using enlarger lenses and I purchased two different types, neither of which worked. In both instances the BEOON column bottoms just prior to acquiring focus. (To be successful there’s a need to hunt either side of critical focus to decide best height adjustment. Not possible in my experience.)

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Hi Steve,

Yes, we've discussed this before. If the column bottoms before achieving focus it means the lens isn't getting close enough to the negative. You need a longer stack of extension tubes. But the length of the tubes also controls the magnification. With a FF camera you want 1:1. There is a magic length of the extension tube stack that will achieve focus and yield a 1:1 magnification with a FF camera and a nominal 50mm lens. The fact that the info printed on the BEOON works with a Leica camera lens proves this. The simplest way to find the magic length of the extension tube stack to work with a particular enlarging lens is trial and error but, as we have also discussed, that can get expensive.

I did it empirically by measuring the magnification with the lengths I did have and interpolating the results. FWIW the magic length for an APSC camera and the version of the Schneider 50/2.8 Componon-S that I happen to have is 40mm.

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