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Ambro51

1905 Jens Poul Andersen 35mm Camera, info and details sought..

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Anyone have any details and info in this early Camera?  The “early 35mm” site covers it with material from Rolf Fricke. Is there  any print material on the camera?  (yes! I want to build one:-)

Edited by Ambro51

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I’ve been able to locate full info on the camera.   The only glitch is it’s in Danish and typewritten, so I’ll need to translate it before moving on.  I’m thinking I’ll be able to duplicate it.  Andersen built a total of 320 cameras individually in a wide range of styles over many years.  Near the end of his building, in 1905, he built Four 35mm Cameras, this one, uses perforated film,   http://www.objektiv.dk/objektiv/skannede_numre/obj25.pdf 

Edited by Ambro51

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Resulting picture is about one third wider than XPan's. This is a brave design.

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A photo of Jens Poul Andersen, the Builder, in his workshop.  BTW I got mahogany today.  Hopefully in awhile I’ll have a working Replica to show here and use.  I’ve translated the full article which is a bit light on actual operation info....it’s enough for me to figure out the shutter and aperature stop slide.  Film advance is very basic, keyed on a 13 perf separation.   Exciting!  I love an opportunity to recreate an historic camera.  I should be able to do it, I’ve made 434 cameras (so far), Anderson only made 320 🙂

Edited by Ambro51

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Hopefully you folks enjoy this post .  Here’s a translation of the Article.       

 

 

THE ANDERSEN SMALL IMAGE CAMERA.                                          Exciting Camera Meeting
Sigfred Lovstad Herning. 1982.

On Saturday evening, the stakeholders in the DFS national meeting in Aarhus opportunity to hear a little about a very special camera, made by the man in Nellered. But since all the members were not present, I have promised here that the new acquisition of my collection will speak.            

                                            
It is a camera engineered to use the perforated 35 mm wide film. just the special thing about this camera is that it was designed very early in the century,  so apparently everyone else got the idea. However, dating is a difficult problem. We will return to that. You may ask: how early did they get the idea to use 35 mm cinema film in one frame? The Leica that came in 1925 has long been proven, and countless successors have followed the Leica's success.  Herr Oskar Barnack in  1913-14 produced the first sample cameras, there are a number of examples of different camera constructions designed for the 35 mm wide film strip in photo history. The earliest appears to be an English patent from 1908. This is mentioned in Brian Coe's book CAMERABOREX (Norwegian edition). But the author adds that it does not appear that the camera was ever manufactured. In France it became. 20 September, 1913  patented a  stereoscopic  camera using 35 mm film, under  the name Homeos  by Jules Richard. It was equipped with 2 Tessar lenses, and took 27 pairs of 1.24 mm stereo images. Attentive catalog readers will have noticed quite high prices on this camera, the few times it has been promoted at the Photographica auction. That same year the American Tourist Multiple camera came. It could hold over 15 meters of film. there were not many Americans coming on tourist travel in Europe, the format was also 11.24 mm, the same format as when the film is used in a cinema camera.                        

How early is the Nellerød man's small picture camera, Yes, best known by these small cameras is what had belonged to Ill. Family Journals traveler employs the globetrotter Holger Rosenberg, and was unfortunately burned at the Technical Museum of Denmark 3. Helsin ør in 1978. This camera used probably 35mm film, but it was unperforated. This gave Rosenberg a larger format. Ilran's son, with whom I have been 1 connection, talks about Dad having a camera before this, but that it was remodeled. This with the remodeling, I have always been a bit skeptical of. When I visited Denmark Technical Museum in October 1977, photographed said camera, then I could not find any signs of rebuilding. In review by Jens Poul Andersen from Nellerød, Holger Rosenberg writes in 1941 that he has had the camera for 35 years. Thus, since the manuscript was written in 1940, this gives 1905 (possibly 1906). Other things, however, speak against the fact that it may be so early, but precisely this cannot yet be put in place. In any case, the burned camera is completed in 1906. Because then Rosenberg's son got out of school to pick it up in Helsinge. But where is Rosenberg's first camera? Yes, I knew that there were 2 pieces in the National Museum's stores.  Nellerød-small picture cameras. But unfortunately they could not immediately find them when I asked them. But then Jørgensen, was in Brede to lend cameras to the exhibition PHOTOHTSTORISK KAVALKADE, it was fortunate that Jørgensen ran on a box in which the 2 cameras were. One is included in the exhibition in Helsingør. The second I borrowed Brede for further study. It turned out that both of these cameras are designed for unperforated 35 mm film just like what was burning. At the Politicians' Publishing House in 1964 "I Photograph" was published under the editorship of Tommy Press. Page 17 shows a Nellerød-Andersen camera and the text says that it was built for Holger Rosenberg. (also available senes. ed. R, said book). In several newspapers this image has been used when Holger Rosenberg's camera at the Technical Museum of Denmark has been mentioned. I was therefore somewhat disoriented when I finally saw the camera in 1977 (as mentioned earlier). But it is right. This, too, is Holger Rosenberg's camera
his FIRST, 

Yes, have talked to Tommy Prenning about the case. He informs me that in his time he borrowed the picture of Poul Johansen who runs Company Flfelt. It was otherwise an Rxft slide. as one might assume. So, say, The question of "redevelopment. Or swap. To whom the camera, which in June, ket lies 1, Elsinore exhibit, one, is cozy, or who it belongs is not, rt. It is possible it has belonged to Peter 11.1, but has not been made visible. The camera now accessed by my collection turns out to be the only one of the now known four small image cameras designed for 135 mm film.  
 
The film transport is done with the right hand thumb turning a small brass handle one turn.This handle, has direct connection with a cogwheel provided with 13 teeth that fits into the film's perforation.The camera has room for the special large format for which the camera is designed (24x60 mm), it gives over 31.1, film-free shooting.The lens is very simply made up of 2 flat convex lenses symmetrically mounted in a brass tube.  It is claimed that Jens Poul Andersen ngs3 even wore lenses, and should have done so in these small cameras aer. It does not indicate anything. However, he probably sanded them to one size. The camera is equipped with a slider to adjust aperature.  There are four f. Values indicated by the following roots: 1/3 1/8 1 / 10, 1/15.The shutter is a type of guillotine shutter that is tensioned by advancing a protruding brass knuckle into a slot in the front of the camera. Immediately when this knob is completed, the shutter is released. The shutter speed is around 1 / 100 sec. . 
 
I took some pictures with the camera, also on Kodachrome. The color shots are astonishingly nice, but the lens cannot cover the elongated format, so the ends are blurred. One might ask the question: what really inspired the Nellerød carpenter to make cameras with such a small format. That he has done so at all is probably related to his construction of the very early cinematographers for court photographer Peter Elfelt. So he has been familiar with the full material. But even the elongated format 24x60mm, or 31x56 mm that the perforated film gives, is still very small formats at that time just a 9x12. cm format was considered a small format. Perhaps it is Holger Rosenberg's need for a small travel camera that has started the case. For this assumption, it can be said that the camera we now know is his first of its kind also has the lowest number of the now known small image cameras. It has No. 305. . The most recently found perforated film has no. 311 and Rosenberg's now tinted-made camera had no. 313. What is exhibited in Helsingør has no. 317. Not much of these numbers can be deduced. The camera has belonged to longtime Doctor in Helsinge, Holger Rørge. I have known for a long time that he had been in the hazel ~ of ace,. Only in February, 1989, did he succeed in finding a colleague of colleague Axel f.:ram Møller in Dellebæk, to find the heir who had in possession of the camera. It is by far the most well-kept of the now known four small Neller, 135 mm cameras. The acquisition has been made possible by Fa. KODAK as, has been a sponsor, which I the Executive Board thank you very much, in, for. The big abroad do not yet know that we have such early 35 mm cameras in this country. But information on this is on the way to 41 international journals.

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So I made good headway and got the body and front plate made.  Tomorrow I do the film chambers and image opening.  The shutter is “figured out” and I’ll get that in.  The Lens.....well I did upgrade from Andersen’s twin Plano convex symmetrical pair, which according to tge article did a poor job in handling the 24x60 format.  Now I have a Leitz 80mm F 4.5 Summar installed.  This IS actually a lens design and size which would have been available to Andersen in 1905.  I’m certain it will have excellent coverage.   The back of the camera has a “plug” which covers the film opening.  No doubt this was used for direct viewing of the focus on film.  This was a common practice with Cine cameras of the day.  The film had no antihalation backer, a frame wasted to set focus was fine.   I’m considering using a built it fine ground glass, both as a view screen and as a pressure plate.  The lens will be focus set for hyperfocal at f11.    •••••.  Hope you enjoy the progress here,  possibly take pictures with it in a few days.  

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Progressing well, film chambers are in, ground glass/pressure plate in.  The film works through smoothly,  making up the 13 tooth cog today, that will connect to a small handle through the base.  One rotation will advance the right amount of film.    The ground glass shows how beautifully the Summar covers the field.  The glass will normally be covered be the lightproof back door (plug).  ••••••. The shutter comes next, basically a spring loaded two piece steel slide with windows.  Basic, simple....let’s see how it works..   I’m hoping to create this camera with ISO 6 orthochromatic  as its “food”.  We shall see....

The area around the film opening will be framed and more completed as I go on. The film chambers are 2 1/4”!  This thing can take Hundreds of exposures!

Edited by Ambro51

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Film aperature gate in.  Now to tackle making a 13 tooth cog     I can see that the leader will need to be trimmed on the bottom about 3”,🙂

Edited by Ambro51

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All Done, and it works perfectly.

Edited by Ambro51

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....another.  These are on Kodak 2238, exposes at F 4.5 I estimate shutter 1/75 sec.     I optimized this with f 4.5 focus about 25 feet.  Depth of field will cover infinity with faster film .  Next film in is Tri X and I’ll shoot smaller aperature .  Really a sweet thing to use and I’m certain it will get a Lot of use.  BTW, the shot of my neighbors house was the first on the roll!  Great way to start!  Last week this time this was a board!!!!  A lot here of course is a product of a superb Leitz 8cm Summar, But the smooth sliding shutter and fantastic feel of the camera certainly help.  Remember, this was the First 35 mm still camera made, in 1905.  The design is so perfect I was able to replicate it, and well, the pictures show the Results!!

(Ps original scans at 1200 are Much crisper) Edited by Ambro51

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I’m going to add a few things in, now that it “passed” the ‘Real Camera’ audition.  First, it’s tough to visualize the field of view.  Andersen used two methods,  one camera used this brass sighting plate, the three others used the cube like brass waist level brilliant finder.   He also used this exact same finder on a wide variety of cameras he made....no matter if they were larger format or stereoscopic.  I’m thinking he “outsourced” these.  Anyway, I’m going a different, though period approach.   A folding wire frame finder to the exact negative size with a folding view window.  I can use the sighting plate to mount them on.   Second, The lens sits right out there.  It’s an uncoated 6 element!  So... how about a rectangular lens hood, of the “Leica” Style.,  Third....I need a counter of some type.  I’m thinking a scalloped wheel about the size of a nickel.  Each turn of the crank advanced it one spot.  I’ll make it for 12, easy to mark out using a watchface.   I’m toying with the idea of making a tiny “abacus” thing with a few tiny brass balls, slide one over for each “12”!   NEVER BEFORE HAVE I HAD SO MUCH FUN!!   🙂

Edited by Ambro51

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I made a Lens Hood from a copper pipe fitting, softened the cooper and formed, cut, trimmed it to shape, part of the fitting was cut away first, the 1” size a slip fit on the Summar.  Using solder I joined the angles and after shapeing with files and bench grinder got it formed and fit.  Using JB weld like a filler, applied a tin coat over all and let harden.   After block sanding and fine sanding, a coat of flat black inside and gloss outside, we have a rectangular lens hood!    ....the wire finder was a coat hanger once... let’s see how all this works out.    Headed to the Harrisville Ruins today.

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