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What is everyone’s favourite film stocks?

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I've dabbled with lots of emulsions since returning to film last summer; especially B&W. My favourites so far are Portra 400 and Tri-X 400, though I'm very fond of the new Ilford Ortho Plus 80. But that's all in my medium format cameras. 

I'd really appreciate some suggestions of what works well in a iiif (with an Elmar 50mm f/2.8), if anyone would like to make recommendations... 

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HP5, Acros and Portra 400. I've still got a few HIE, expired of course.

I got 5 rolls of Ferrania P30 a couple of weeks ago that I will be trying out soon.

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ektachrome, portra 400 (160 in the summer), hp5+ (less contrast that Tri-x makes for better scanning -- can always add contrast).

 

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I like Portra 160 for colour and Ilford black and white films. Transparency has to be Fuji these days as my favourite was Kodachrome rip. 

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Judging by usage, ranked from most often and preferred usage on top:

1. Ilford FP4+ 125 film (35 and 120 formats)
2. Ilford PanF+ 50 film (35 format)
3. Kodak Ektar 100 film (35 and 120 formats)
4. Ilford HP5+ 400 film (35 and 120 formats)
5. Fuji Provia 100F film (35 format)
6. Ilford XP2 Super 400 (35 format)

Since it is critical for B&W film, my preferred and only developers are Xtol and Rodinal. 

Never been a big fan of Kodak Tri-X 400 (often too grainy and contrasty for my taste no matter which kind of developer I used) and Kodak Porta 160 (okay for portraits but weak in comparison to Ektar 100 for landscapes). I will also stay away from Ilford Delta 3200 (much too grainy) - rather prefer to push HP5+ if needed. Tested Ferrania P30, but it is simply too contrasty for me for most situations where I find myself for shooting (I would only use it in extreme high contrast situations which I find rare). Ilford XP2 Super 400 is my B&W choice if I need to switch between different ISO numbers on the same film (problem here is that the negatives are not the most suitable ones to be used for darkroom printing). 

Edited by Martin B

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6 hours ago, Martin B said:

...Ilford XP2 Super 400 is my B&W choice if I need to switch between different ISO numbers on the same film (problem here is that the negatives are not the most suitable ones to be used for darkroom printing). 

Interesting comment. In my experience XP2 prints beautifully.

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Tried many over the last 20 years...

B&W favourites remain TriX and Delta 100/400.

processed right nothing beats TriX for impact and overall sharpness at bigger sized prints.

Both Delta Films give a tonality thats almost half acceptable compared to a 6X6 neg, and that’s much more than the most other films.

Color is Portra 160 for me but only in my Rolleiflex 🤫

andy

 

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For me, lately, its Delta 100 for my barnack, Delta 400 for my M2, and I'm testing XP2 out in one of my Nikons. 

Medium format is Delta 100 or 400, depending on the camera's shutter speed range. Or some expired Portra 400. I have a pro pack of the new Ektachrome 100 waiting for a nice hike into the mountains (too much snow right now). 

I really want to try out the Washi films, but haven't found any for sale lately. 

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135 format: Kodak Pro Image ISO 100 and Fujifilm Xtra 400, but when my stock runs out, I may stay with ISO 100 only. It's about $4.5 per 36exp.

                      They are color negatives, but after scan, they can export B&W too. What I like is the flexibility to control the contrast and tonal by playing with the color channel. 

                       I also like their "grain" structure through the scan, much preferred than any Ilford or Tmax.

120 format: Kodak Ektar 100 and Portra 400. Same as 135 format, when my stock runs out, I will stay with ISO 100 only.

The preference of ISO 100 is due to my favorite Hasselblad SWC/M (38mm). The highest shutter speed is 500th. ISO 400 is too fast.

I have a A24 back to load 135 format to shoot 54mm x 24mm panorama and a A12 back to load 120 format to shoot 54mm x 54mm square.

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In addition to many of the black and white films mentioned here, I still enjoy shooting on Agfa Scala 200 black and white reversal film.
With slides on the light table, I can still judge more precisely which photo is worth making a scan.
What I miss most is Kodak Plus-X-125, Fuji Neopan 1600 and all Kodachromes.

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Although I´m using all film stocks that find the way into my fridge, even long expired materials, I have some favorites:

  • B&W:                   Tri-X, esp. because I find it easiest to print in my darkroom
  • Color negative:  Portra 160, because it fits most of situations and scans easily
  • Slidefilm:            Agfa CT 100 Precisa, mostly because I managed to stock up on it for a bargain :)

 

 

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