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Zoeearles

Is this authentic?

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Hello,

My boyfriend and I have come across this camera and are looking to see if this camera is authentic.

We have taken it to a camera shop and they've advised we post it on here to see if it is real, and the potential value of it.

Here are all the pictures of it, it's quite heavy.

Edited by Zoeearles

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No way - fake. Everything screams Ukraine, and the serial number is for a Leica 1 from 1929...

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Well, I would not join moderator jaapv nor wizard in their assertion the camera is a Ukraine ( or soviet) copy. Unless the lens is removed to show the shape of the telemeter connection head, it looks like a Leica II, upgraded from a Leica I (serial). What is dfinitely "fake" and possibly "eastern", is the golden finish and the body "vulcanite". And finally, no question to give any kind of valuation in this forum.

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41 minutes ago, Pecole said:

Well, I would not join moderator jaapv nor wizard in their assertion the camera is a Ukraine ( or soviet) copy. Unless the lens is removed to show the shape of the telemeter connection head, it looks like a Leica II, upgraded from a Leica I (serial). What is dfinitely "fake" and possibly "eastern", is the golden finish and the body "vulcanite". And finally, no question to give any kind of valuation in this forum.

Even the screws are Zorki-type ;)

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45 minutes ago, Pecole said:

Well, I would not join moderator jaapv nor wizard in their assertion the camera is a Ukraine ( or soviet) copy. Unless the lens is removed to show the shape of the telemeter connection head, it looks like a Leica II, upgraded from a Leica I (serial). What is dfinitely "fake" and possibly "eastern", is the golden finish and the body "vulcanite". And finally, no question to give any kind of valuation in this forum.

I would. 

It's clearly a Russian fake - plenty of obvious signs such as the slightly 'melted' look of the parts, the cable threaded shutter release, the aperture ring on the 'Elmar' lens and many more.

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But the question was: "is it real?" In fact it is a real camera - just not a Leica :lol:

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OK, please accept my reddition . I was too superficial and am now convinced (like Earleygallery, Braconi, Sabears. Wizard and other Jaapv) : it is a "comrade". Punt, and back to bed.

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Give it the banjo or balalaika test. If the rangefinder cam is round it may be genuine, but if it is roughly triangular it is definitely fake. As has been said, all the rest of the camera's appearance seems to point to this being a fake. Readers here may care to note that genuine very early Soviet Leica copies (as opposed to 'fakes', do I need to explain the difference?) have been selling for very large sums at auction in recent times.

William

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Even if the cam-follower is round, I wouldn't touch it  with a bargepole. Some fakers have gotten wise to the Balalaika. The real test is ot look under the bottom plate.

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You do not even to check the rangefinder arm, have you ever seen Leica with rectangular viewer window like this? Lens is Industar, look at the aperture ring. And plenty of other minor details....

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You I suppose need to have in your mind what a real one looks like, but the main giveaway for me, and before looking at details, are the soft rolled edges to the main body pressings. The Russian fakes do not have the precise edges along the top and bottom plate of a real Leica, possibly because the tooling is less accurate, or the brass used isn't the same grade. The other possibility is that when pressing things out the object often goes through two process of being stamped, one to get the rough shape, the second to refine it, the Russian cameras all look like they've left it after the first pressing. But yes it is definitely a fake and I hope it didn't cost much.

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A Leica model I with Elmar, year 1929 : no rangefinder… and not a gold plated one… :rolleyes:… but model I could be converted to the model II on which the depicted fake is based (as a curiosity… seems to me that the above gold item has "300" instead of "500" on the times' knob)

Edited by luigi bertolotti

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Does anybody ever use a common but authentic Leica, perhaps for example a IIIa and engrave or repaint it to look like a German military issue item? How could one tell it was a fake?

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