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hockey44

Workflow- hardware recommendations

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Please forgive my digression to “work flow” and hardware.  I suspect I am not the only person who is more interested in taking photos and less so about the enormous amount of data one creates with larger files and trying to organize, sort and find.  Well I have avoided updating my Mac OS for some time as I am running LR6 on an iMac and also a MacBook Pro.  My goal is to merge 2  approx. 1TB libraries into 1 external HD (which of course will have multiple back-ups) that I can then plug into my MBP when I want to edit or view photos in a merged library.  THEN, migrate to Capture 1 and finally update my Mac OS’s.  I should add that I have been using  my laptop which is now nearly full (since I got the Q2 and the 47mb photos, it goes faster than my M240…hah).

Some questions:
What would be a good Mac type model say 4Tb HD or should I use multiple 2Tb?


Since attending an Overgaard masterclass I started following his recommendations of numbering folders so that will help with my last 4 years, however when one merges into Capture 1 should I try to have a common naming nomenclature for all the folders?  But any links or suggestions where I can get tips on this greatly appreciated.


Has anyone written a piece on how to ‘get your photos off your laptop and into a more professional hard drive’?


Once again, apologies in advance for digressing to ‘boring’ sorting, filing and organizing!  But the devil is in the details and as these libraries continue to grow the task is now daunting for me.

If someone knows anyone in London, UK who can assist in this, please send me an intro.  As a recent grandpa, the library is seemingly growing exponentially! hah

Many thanks and if this should be in another forum, kindly point me....

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There is no one answer.  But some things to consider:  If you use a computer with an internal SSD, are you willing to pay the price of a very large SSD recognizing you will need an equally big external drive for Time Machine?  Will you work from your external drive or continue to work from your internal drive?  What connection will you use for the external drive - USB, USB-C, Thunderbolt 2, Thunderbolt 3?  What technology will you use for the external drive - HDD, SSD, hybrid SSD/HDD?  All these determine how fast the data can be moved between computer and external drive.  Then, should you be using a RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Drives) for data assurance?  And finally - how much are you willing to spend?  A Drobo 8D Thunderbolt 3 RAID set for triple redundancy with 8 HDDs and an SSD buffer drive gets expensive very quickly. 

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1 hour ago, pico said:

Are HDDs really justified today?

 

In terms of price, vs SSD, yes they are still a lot cheaper - over here anyway. I don't think an SSD is particularly useful for long term storage.

Edited by ianman

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21 minutes ago, ianman said:

In terms of price, vs SSD, yes they are still a lot cheaper - over here anyway. I don't think an SSD is particularly useful for long term storage.

I cannot understand why SSD is not advantageous for long term storage especially if it is kept modestly active and for us that will be the norm.

 

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23 hours ago, hockey44 said:

I suspect I am not the only person who is more interested in taking photos and less so about the enormous amount of data one creates with larger files and trying to organize, sort and find.

On Mac, the Finder itself is very capable of helping to organise, sort and find. The search feature is really badly designed in terms of user-friendliness, but is very powerful.

For example, to find .DNG files, type "type:images dng" in the search textbox field of a Finder window.

Or use the search criteria selectors to build a multi-criteria search. As above, this will return all the .dng files

Add for example a date or date range... 

Then find all the dng files created using a 28mm lens

at ISO 160...

Then you can copy the returned files and paste them into a new folder on your other drive.

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2 minutes ago, pico said:

I cannot understand why SSD is not advantageous for long term storage especially if it is kept modestly active and for us that will be the norm.

What would be the advantages? Speed? Does that matter for long term storage? I guess a SDD will use less energy but the price difference is still massive.

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30 minutes ago, ianman said:

What would be the advantages? Speed? Does that matter for long term storage? I guess a SDD will use less energy but the price difference is still massive.

The pric of SSD is insignificant when compared to the disadvantage of HDD. SSD wins.

Edited by pico

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14 minutes ago, pico said:

The price difference is insignificant when compared to HDD.

You're right... it's insignificant.

4TB Seagate Barracuda ST4000LM024 2.5" SATA III  Hard Drive HDD -> $109.95

Western Digital Blue 2.5" 4TB SATA III Solid State Drive -> $914.74 

 

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You will need to consider internal memory with an eye to future development. I'm testing out Topaz Sharpen AI right now. The results are far superior to any other noise reduction and sharpening plug-in I know, but despite my venerable MacPro  having 16 GB of RAM and 4 GB on the video card, which is normally sufficient (and the maximum it can take),  the app is deadly slow,  for 24 MB files it  really needs 32/4. For 50 MP files I'm sure it will be 32/8 or possibly 64/8. According to Topaz it will suffer occasional crashes on 8/2.
The culprit is clearly the AI, which will be the future of image processing.

Make sure your RAM and Video RAM are upgradable.

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Given that virtual memory was invented in the 1950’s it’s astonishing that programs still fail rather than simply slow down when RAM is exhausted. The programmers should be drug into the street and shot.

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