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stvn66

Fix a screw in filter onto a Summarit lens

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Hi,

Having lost screw in filter for my Summarit I have now had to buy a replacement. It does not screw on securely and can easily detach itself...again.

Does anyone have any tips I could use to make it more secure. I have considered a few dabs of a mild glue or perhaps some wet tissue added to the thread?

Thank you.

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You could try some Teflon tape on the thread or gaffer tape on the outside. It would be easier to undo later than glue, I'd think.

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Apply a real tiny amount of a commercial screw adhesive like Loctite 222, it is specified for screws of small diameter, they still can be removed later. Do not apply nail lacquer or common glue etc.

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Leica uses some kind of permanently flexible black rubber kit.

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, AndreasG said:

Apply a real tiny amount of a commercial screw adhesive like Loctite 222, it is specified for screws of small diameter, they still can be removed later. Do not apply nail lacquer or common glue etc.

Hello Andreas,

I agree not to use glue. 

I have used a TINY amount of (usually) bright RED nail polish for years. Bright red so that I can make sure that I am not using too much & so that I can see where any excess is. And remove it. Because when the tiny amount is properly in place there is none visible.

I have never had a problem because I follow the rule that: You can never use too little.

It always keeps things in place. It always come apart easily. It always cleans up nicely because I only use nail polish that is solvent in PURE acetone. I don't use nail polish remover since some contain oils, etc to keep a person's hands from drying. Most of the time you can remove it with a finger nail or a toothpick.

Could you explain what you do not like about using nail polish which is solvent in pure acetone. Which not all nail polishes are.

Best Regards,

Michael

Edited by Michael Geschlecht

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Michael, which nail Polish do you use, I'm not too experienced in this field?

Thanks

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Posted (edited)

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17 minutes ago, stvn66 said:

Michael, which nail Polish do you use, I'm not too experienced in this field?

Thanks

Hello stvn66,

Just find a person wearing nail polish that you like the look of & ask them. tell them that you need an acetone soluble nail polish. 

Commercial nail polish removers mostly all contain oils, etc to keep a person's skin from drying. This leaves a residue which makes applying new nail polish more difficult. Or not possible.

Pure acetone is available in hardware stores. Buy the smallest container. Please remember that pure acetone is EXPLOSIVE. So use it appropriately & don't leave the cap off while you are working with it.

Unscrew the cap. Put in a Q-Tip (Cotton swab on a stick.) and tilt the can (Not glass jar.) to its side enough for the acetone to reach the Q-Tip and then put the cap back on then.

No smoking or heat around where you are working, of course. Lots of fresh air is a good thing.

Pure acetone, which everyone manufactures in their own body, is a reasonably usable organic solvent for a lot of things. Like most "permanent" markers. Altho it does dissolve some things, like certain plastics.

Best Regards,

Michael

Edited by Michael Geschlecht

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vor 5 Stunden schrieb Michael Geschlecht:

Could you explain what you do not like about using nail polish which is solvent in pure acetone. Which not all nail polishes are.

Hello Michael,

My experience comes from building small steam engines and locomotives with screws (often soft brass material) down to diam. 0.8mm, which need to be tightened appropiately without damage. Nail polish is not nail polish, they differ in their solvent, ingredients, time for hardening, hardness/brittleness therafter etc. and most important, nail polish does not wet metal surfaces well, especially when oily residues from cutting remain. That are the reasons I prefer Loctite 222 (there are further Loctite types available which are not usable for tiny threads), the 222 type is of pink color, therefore visible when applying, it turns almost colorless after "hardening", but remains somehow sticky but not brittle for a later release, which can be assisted by a little warming, e.g., with a hairdryer. This is simply my experience, it is not a commercial on behalf of Loctite.

And, nail polish, if branded, costs much more than a small bottle of Loctite, of course, you can borrow from your wife....

Michael, seems you made good experience with nail polish, so go ahead, I accept that. As so often in life, there many solutions, but none is perfect.

Best regards,

Andreas

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Hello Andreas,

You & I are an example of: "There is more than 1 way to make a nice apple pie".

I only use nail polish that is solvent in acetone (Please read precautions, etc in Post #7 above.).

I am sure that you also use the LEAST amount of loctite that is needed to hold successfully. Which is usually much less than what is needed to cover the entire surfaces involved.

For example: With a screw (Like in a pair of eyeglasses.): Just a little bit UNDER the head of the screw & sometimes just a small amount additionally for a short distance down the screw from under the head, if needed, is usually enough.

For a filter perhaps 3 TINY dots equidistantly placed 120 degree apart from each other going around the filter. The tiny dots are placed just under the top of  the filter where the top of the filter touches the lens.

By the way, what scale?

Best Regards,

Michael

 

Edited by Michael Geschlecht

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1 hour ago, AndreasG said:

Hello Michael,

My experience comes from building small steam engines and locomotives with screws (often soft brass material) down to diam. 0.8mm, which need to be tightened appropiately without damage. Nail polish is not nail polish, they differ in their solvent, ingredients, time for hardening, hardness/brittleness therafter etc. and most important, nail polish does not wet metal surfaces well, especially when oily residues from cutting remain. That are the reasons I prefer Loctite 222 (there are further Loctite types available which are not usable for tiny threads), the 222 type is of pink color, therefore visible when applying, it turns almost colorless after "hardening", but remains somehow sticky but not brittle for a later release, which can be assisted by a little warming, e.g., with a hairdryer. This is simply my experience, it is not a commercial on behalf of Loctite.

And, nail polish, if branded, costs much more than a small bottle of Loctite, of course, you can borrow from your wife....

Michael, seems you made good experience with nail polish, so go ahead, I accept that. As so often in life, there many solutions, but none is perfect.

Best regards,

Andreas

 

 

Sold. I will go with the Loctite 222. Thank you Andreas

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vor 14 Stunden schrieb Michael Geschlecht:

I am sure that you also use the LEAST amount of loctite that is needed to hold successfully. Which is usually much less than what is needed to cover the entire surfaces involved.

For example: With a screw (Like in a pair of eyeglasses.): Just a little bit UNDER the head of the screw & sometimes just a small amount additionally for a short distance down the screw from under the head, if needed, is usually enough.

Hello Michael,

This is definitely a valuable advice - less is more! Many users tend to apply too much and only onto the tip of the screw and then the loctite is distributed all over the thread as a thin layer. Just a small amount under the head, best applied with a needle or toothpick is sufficient, as explained above by you.

Best regards,

Andreas

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On 5/22/2019 at 1:09 AM, stvn66 said:

Sold. I will go with the Loctite 222. Thank you Andreas

Arghhhhhh.....!

As a mechanical engineer with over 40 years experience, I have found...'That which can get STUCK will get stuck'...Sod's Law.

IMVHO don't go any where near any form of thread locking chemical. I just chance to luck and check my filters regularly, I've only two. 

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Hi Dave,

Thank you for your advice :)

I will be using no more than a pin head amount of glue.

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3 hours ago, stvn66 said:

Hi Dave,

Thank you for your advice :)

I will be using no more than a pin head amount of glue.

Hello Everybody,

And don't forget the alternative of a small amount of nail polish. Acetone soluble.

Best Regards,

Michael

 

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On 5/17/2019 at 1:52 PM, stvn66 said:

Hi,

Having lost screw in filter for my Summarit I have now had to buy a replacement. It does not screw on securely and can easily detach itself...again.

Does anyone have any tips I could use to make it more secure. I have considered a few dabs of a mild glue or perhaps some wet tissue added to the thread?

Thank you.

I cringe to think I'd have to put ANYTHING on a filter thread, unless maybe a bit of graphite from a #2 pencil as a lubricant. Sounds like you have either the wrong filter or damaged threads. Which Summarit do you have?

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On 5/24/2019 at 1:20 AM, Winslowe said:

I cringe to think I'd have to put ANYTHING on a filter thread, unless maybe a bit of graphite from a #2 pencil as a lubricant. Sounds like you have either the wrong filter or damaged threads. Which Summarit do you have?

I have the 50mm Summarit. The Orange filter fits perfectly but as there is no resistance at the end, it can become loose, hence the glue.

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20 hours ago, stvn66 said:

I have the 50mm Summarit. The Orange filter fits perfectly but as there is no resistance at the end, it can become loose, hence the glue.

My Summarit is an old 50 f/1.5 39mm screw mount with 41mm filter threads. But whichever version you have,, the correct filter should screw on silky smooth and when snugged up not loosen. I personally would only recommend any kind of thread locker as a last resort, but do let us know how it turns out. Good luck!

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