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paul.bridges.3388

Lightroom Q2 RAW problems

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Only for JPG shots. If you are shooting JPG only, I assume that there will be no postprocessing and that they are destined for Social Media use only. In that case choose the smallest colour space i.e. sRGB.

If you are shootiing DNG the colourspace in the camera is irrelevant, as it is set during raw conversion. In that case I would advise choosing a colourspace that matches your monitor, usually Adobe RGB for high-end screens (check the specs) and sRGB for simpler ones. Only use Profoto if you know what you are doing. AFAIK the underlying colourspace for Lightroom is Profoto, but in that case the program will do the hard work for you.

As an aside - in any case, make sure that you calibrate your screen regularly. Otherwise your colours will be completely off.

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Posted (edited)

As you’re already paying an Adobe subscription, I would move to LR CC Classic (same interface as your LR6.x) and upgrade to 8.3.  You will not only gain the latest camera and lens profiles, but you can take advantage of the many other LR improvements since the earlier versions, e.g., dehaze control, texture slider, and other refinements to both global and local control options.  

There are free videos on LR (and Photoshop, which is included in the Adobe Classic package) by Julieanne Kost that will give you easy overviews and tips on these and other features.

And speaking of videos, a Google search will bring up many videos on using and installing the ColorChecker Passport.  When I got mine years ago, I watched a bunch of them and picked up a tip or two that proved useful for my own preferred workflow.

All these options are easy to install and try.  Experimentation will guide on what process and settings you prefer.

Jeff

Edited by Jeff S

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On 5/16/2019 at 7:09 AM, paul.bridges.3388 said:

I have a subscription for Adobe Creative and so able to upgrade to 8.2 readily enough.

If your current Adobe subscription service enables you to use Lightroom CC 8.2 without incurring any costs shouldn't that be your first option? Why pay out $120 for the Xrite system at this stage?

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17 hours ago, paul.bridges.3388 said:

The Q2 menu offers three colour profiles, including Adobe RGB.  Is there a preferred setting?

Jaapv: Not enough information in your response for it to make good sense. Display calibration and profiles are different from CCP and output color profiles. You implied the comprehensive world of Color Management science but there simply isn't enough info for it to make sense in that response. You don't pick output profiles for your display ... You calibrate and profile the display so that it becomes a reference for your eye, then camera calibration profiles massage the raw data to fit an accurate representation of the subject in the captured data, and you use output profiles to fit that data to use on different devices (displays, printers, web press machines, etc etc). ProPhoto RGB is neither tricky nor difficult, but does require some understanding: it is the natural choice for editing raw camera data since it is a master color space that is larger than any  existing output device, which allows editing without running clipping concerns. It is only sensible for use with 16 bit channel data ... Once you convert and image from raw into channel data and then output it as 8 bit, you should always use an 8 bit compatible output color space, either sRGB or Adobe RGB. JPEG image files are always 8 bit per channel. 

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Output color profiles are completely different things from camera calibration profiles. Color profiles affect the rendering from raw data into RGB channel data at a layer above the camera calibration profile operation, targeting the image for best compatibility with different output color spaces. 

The Adobe RGB (1998) color space is an output color space targeted to suit web press printing needs. It is slightly larger than the de facto standard (sRGB) with a broader gamut and gentler gamma curve, because web press printing usually has some contrast gain associated with it. Use Adobe RGB color space for JPEG images that you're handing off to an editing process intended to be used in print publications, where an editor and layout manager might need to tweak things a bit to get a range of images from different sources to match properly. Otherwise, use sRGB. 

If you really want to know all about color management, "Real World Color Management 2nd Edition" by Bruce Fraser et al, published in 2004, is one of the definitive books on the subject. :D

Edited by ramarren

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On 5/16/2019 at 11:42 AM, paul.bridges.3388 said:

That’s really interesting - thank you.  So the exact symptoms that I’m experiencing.  Did you settle on OOC Jpg or persevere with DNG conversion profiles.  I’ve always edited Raw but won’t if the camera conversion is so much better. 

These days it's safe for me to say I never shoot jpeg -- not even with my phone.  That's pretty much always been the case when shooting with cameras.

Edited by marchyman

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Leaving out "these days": +1. I haven't used JPG since 2001, except by mistake and on non-raw enabled phones.

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On 5/17/2019 at 3:07 PM, Jayk said:

If your current Adobe subscription service enables you to use Lightroom CC 8.2 without incurring any costs shouldn't that be your first option? Why pay out $120 for the Xrite system at this stage?

Because you can create your own profiles based on your own camera and specific shooting situations?

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On 5/17/2019 at 6:55 PM, ramarren said:

Jaapv: Not enough information in your response for it to make good sense. Display calibration and profiles are different from CCP and output color profiles. You implied the comprehensive world of Color Management science but there simply isn't enough info for it to make sense in that response. You don't pick output profiles for your display ... You calibrate and profile the display so that it becomes a reference for your eye, then camera calibration profiles massage the raw data to fit an accurate representation of the subject in the captured data, and you use output profiles to fit that data to use on different devices (displays, printers, web press machines, etc etc). ProPhoto RGB is neither tricky nor difficult, but does require some understanding: it is the natural choice for editing raw camera data since it is a master color space that is larger than any  existing output device, which allows editing without running clipping concerns. It is only sensible for use with 16 bit channel data ... Once you convert and image from raw into channel data and then output it as 8 bit, you should always use an 8 bit compatible output color space, either sRGB or Adobe RGB. JPEG image files are always 8 bit per channel. 

---

Output color profiles are completely different things from camera calibration profiles. Color profiles affect the rendering from raw data into RGB channel data at a layer above the camera calibration profile operation, targeting the image for best compatibility with different output color spaces. 

The Adobe RGB (1998) color space is an output color space targeted to suit web press printing needs. It is slightly larger than the de facto standard (sRGB) with a broader gamut and gentler gamma curve, because web press printing usually has some contrast gain associated with it. Use Adobe RGB color space for JPEG images that you're handing off to an editing process intended to be used in print publications, where an editor and layout manager might need to tweak things a bit to get a range of images from different sources to match properly. Otherwise, use sRGB. 

If you really want to know all about color management, "Real World Color Management 2nd Edition" by Bruce Fraser et al, published in 2004, is one of the definitive books on the subject. :D

Godfrey, we nearly always agree, but I think that you are really over-complicating things here for somebody who appears to be at the left-hand side of the learning curve.

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1 hour ago, jaapv said:

Godfrey, we nearly always agree, but I think that you are really over-complicating things here for somebody who appears to be at the left-hand side of the learning curve.

Perhaps, but perhaps Paul would like to know more and maybe push a little to the right on that curve. :)

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