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fatihayoglu

Film scan with DSLR, which side is up?

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Hi all,

So I scan my negatives with a DSLR and macro lens, negatives being on a light table. When I scan, I always put the coated (or shinny) side of the negative towards the camera, however the other day I came across a video saying the matte side should be towards the camera , light coming from the shiny side, as it would be in the actual camera.

so the question is which side of the negative should face to light, which face to camera?

many thanks,

Fatih

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The matte, emulsion, side should be facing the light source with the shiny, base, side toward the scanner or the camera in your case.

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11 hours ago, plaidshirts said:

The matte, emulsion, side should be facing the light source with the shiny, base, side toward the scanner or the camera in your case.

Thanks a lot, I am glad I was following the correct protocol. 

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On 4/23/2019 at 7:54 AM, plaidshirts said:

The matte, emulsion, side should be facing the light source with the shiny, base, side toward the scanner or the camera in your case.

Why is that? Isn't it 'emulsion to emulsion'? (i.e.; emulsion towards the lens/sensor.) Reverse the 'scan' later if that's necessary?

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Emulsion to emulsion is certainly the rule for a film to printing paper contact print. I haven't found that it makes a difference when "scanning" negatives with a digital camera. I keep the film emulsion side down so it is in contact with the smooth light box surface while the film base side is in contact with the metal mask of the BEOON copy stand. 

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Perhaps it makes no difference at all, I’m certainly not inclined to test it (life is far too short) but might scanning the ‘shiny side’ increase reflections and it would mean scanning through the film base. 

It won’t keep me up tonight either way but since the question was asked... I always considered the emulsion to be the side the image was recorded on so the side to be interested in.

For best results don’t scan anything, enlarge and print to taste. :)

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10 hours ago, monther said:

Why is that? Isn't it 'emulsion to emulsion'? (i.e.; emulsion towards the lens/sensor.) Reverse the 'scan' later if that's necessary?

I don't know the technical reason why but both my scanners do it this way (Coolscan and Epson) and I've seen reports ranging from "doesn't make a difference" to "clearly better" from those that have used digital cameras to scan.

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I remember testing this on my Coolscan 9000 over Vuescan and did not see any difference in result whether I had the emulsion up or down. It may not apply to digitizing or other scanners, of course.

br

Philip

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