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jwillyf

SD cards for Q2

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I am awaiting delivery of a Q2 and have a couple of UHS-1 SD cards. I know UHS-2 is recommended for the Q2 but am I right in thinking my UHS-1 cards would be ok in the Q2, albeit perhaps slower in writing images. I am not interested in video recording.

Thanks

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29 minutes ago, jwillyf said:

I am awaiting delivery of a Q2 and have a couple of UHS-1 SD cards. I know UHS-2 is recommended for the Q2 but am I right in thinking my UHS-1 cards would be ok in the Q2, albeit perhaps slower in writing images. I am not interested in video recording.

Thanks

I would think UHS-I cards are fine. Just slow relative to UHS-II cards. I have a whole batch of UHS-I cards I plan to use in my Q2. I don't tend to need fast cards. My landscapes don't move very fast. 😁

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I'll be sticking with UHS-1 since I rarely take videos and almost never shoot 4K and I have no plans for high-FPS RAW capture (also UHS-II cards are crazy expensive).

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The other consideration, if you take a lot of photos before transferring them to your computer, is the speed at which they will transfer. On that basis I have bought a UHS-II card and UHS-II SanDisk card reader as I'm guessing otherwise the 80MB RAW files are going to take some time to transfer.

Edit: In other words it's not only the write speed that's relevant but also the read speed.

Stephen

Edited by Stephen_C

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14 minutes ago, Stephen_C said:

The other consideration, if you take a lot of photos before transferring them to your computer, is the speed at which they will transfer. On that basis I have bought a UHS-II card and UHS-II SanDisk card reader as I'm guessing otherwise the 80MB RAW files are going to take some time to transfer.

Edit: In other words it's not only the write speed that's relevant but also the read speed.

Stephen

This is the reason I used UHS-II cards even on my Q1. Reading them into my computer was way faster.

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1 hour ago, Stephen_C said:

The other consideration, if you take a lot of photos before transferring them to your computer, is the speed at which they will transfer. On that basis I have bought a UHS-II card and UHS-II SanDisk card reader as I'm guessing otherwise the 80MB RAW files are going to take some time to transfer.

Edit: In other words it's not only the write speed that's relevant but also the read speed.

Stephen

EXCELLENT Point! Thanks. 

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Does anybody know of a chart (grid) that shows how many pix of what type specific UHS-II cards will hold.

Also, is 64 GB big enough for moderate use? Should I have bought 128 GB instead?

Is 64 GB as reliable as 128 GB? 256 GB?

Thank you.

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Don't buy immense cards, not only are they expensive, if something happens to it you will lose too many shots. Unless you are a heavy user, like for instance a wedding photographer, a couple of 64 GB cards should be more than ample for an intensive day of shooting. For normal amateur daily use 32 GB  plus a 16 GB spare should be fine.

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5 hours ago, Learner said:

What's your advice for somebody going to Europe for a month? Load up on cards or keep uploading the the Cloud?

My personal view (and I accept others will differ) is to take cards - particularly given the size of Q2 files (plus or minus 80MB each). Cloud uploads may prove to be rather slow especially if you're relying on public Wi-Fi networks. I'm guessing that if you're going round Europe for a month you'll have better things to do than to wait for Q2 files to upload to the Cloud!

For what it's worth, you should get over 500 photos on a 64GB card. Personally, I bought a 128GB UHS-II card. I do think if you buy a reliable make there is not a big risk of losing anything these days (cards are quite reliable now) although I accept the words of caution already expressed.

Stephen

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1 hour ago, Learner said:

When you say 500, is that dng, jpeg, or dng+jpeg?

I'm so sorry not to have made that clear: how silly of me! It's for DNG (only—not DNG + jpg).

Stephen

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On 3/16/2019 at 1:44 AM, Learner said:

Thank you Jaap... What's your advice for somebody going to Europe for a month? Load up on cards or keep uploading the the Cloud?

I use a SSD backup disk and as many cards as I think I need. But you are going to Europe, not the wilderness. Every hotel will have WiFi  and there is fast Internet all over the place. You can back up to your laptop and upload to the cloud overnight 

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Well for some Europe is perceived as the wilderness. Perhaps the answer to the question should be another question, “I’m going to the US for a month, load up on cards or use the cloud?” 😉

Edited by HighlandK

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Regards the large card vs small card thing: I've *never* had an SD card go bad. Ever. Unless it was defective as purchased, which any sensible test in the first day or two will show up. Even that has only happened once. I use Lexar Pro 1000x 128G cards. I don't even bother with backups anymore ... waste of time, just more equipment to carry. I'm more likely to drop and damage the equipment than the card is to go bad... ! 

The only issue I've had with very large cards holding huge numbers of exposures is that it sometimes takes a while for the iPad or Leica FOTOs to generate and display previews.

I don't have a Q or Q2, I have an M-D and a CL. I should say I use "a" Lexar Pro 128G card, because in either camera this card holds over 2000 DNG exposures and I have never had to change out for another in the field or even on a three week trip, even though I always carry a spare. If the Q2 raw files are twice the size of the CL or M-D raw files, figure on a 128G card storing about 1000 of them, with some safety margin beyond that.

The joy of a large capacity card is that you don't have to bother swapping and managing it when you're traveling. I use Leica FOTOs with the CL to review and selectively download image files wirelessly for processing on the iPad Pro when traveling. With the M-D I use the USB-C to SD card dongle. Either way, it works fine and even if the card did go bad, I'll typically have a copy of the most interesting photos I made on the iPad Pro anyway. That's often enough. :)

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6 hours ago, jaapv said:

I use a SSD backup disk and as many cards as I think I need. But you are going to Europe, not the wilderness. Every hotel will have WiFi  and there is fast Internet all over the place. You can back up to your laptop and upload to the cloud overnight 

I absolutely see the wisdom in your strategy, but I’m a bit of a ludite. I like hardware and I dislike using the cloud. I don’t use LR CC, I use LR Classic. I don’t have a need to view all my photos on multiple platforms. I will also say I’ve  only ever in 16 years had a memory card fail. It was an off brand and it permanently made me a fan of Sandisk. All I buy. All I use. Work great. Like Ramarren I worry more about dropoing my camera although I don’t think that would damage the SD card. My camera being stolen would definitely be a bummer and a reason I don’t want too large of cards although admittedly that to is a low probability. I watch my stuff carefully. 

Bottom line I’m comfortable with my plan. 

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I carry enough card capacity for an entire trip, cards are relatively cheap.  I then download the cards to my laptop (it has a large SSD), then back that up to an external hard drive.  If I get a killer shot I make sure it’s uploaded to the cloud. I have found that most hotel upload speeds to be very slow.

 Most importantly as I travel, these three copies of my images are NEVER in the same bag.  I am more concerned about theft than a card failing - and it has happened.  My laptop was stolen off a canal boat in France.  Fortunately I had my camera and cards with me so no lost images.  I didn’t use an external hard drive then, but I do now as it will fit in a safe.  When I’m moving around and have everything with us, I keep my camera/cards in one bag, computer in another, and my wife carries the hard drive. So far so good. 

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