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Pecole

How many Leica I ? - 6th and last part

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To finish the series, the Leica I with normalized thread : it is the real start of the "Leica system". But since it is - following me - the less interesting, I had only four in my collection, and probably none was "genuine" : nº 10546 (clearly a modified IA), 24744, 60685 and 64523. They served mainly as supports for early lenses and accessories.

Here are the photos I propose : the two first ones illustrate a classical Leica I with its "0" engraved flange. Next is an image showing Leica I (C) with either "11 o'clock" and more classical "7 o'clock" 50mm Elmar. The two next ones are more interesting : they show Leica I nº 24744 that came with a brass plate in place of the viewfinder and a MIKAS, the nº 60685 showing exactly the same plate. Most probably two cameras utilized for some scientific application, and possibly coming from the same place. Four last photos are interesting for the equipment they illustrate : an 11 o'clock Elmar 50 mm with the first model FISON hood and an APDOO delay release; an Hektor lens with an AUFSU reflecting viewfinder; a set of lenses comprising an Elmar 35 mm, an Hektor 50 mm and a "fat" Elmar 90 mm plus a VISOR viewfinder, an old FISON hood and a black metal flat lens cap; and finally a Thambar with its special spot filter and SHADE, and a VISOR.

 

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Great series, Pecole. I have that first FISON hood with the 'square' front. They are rare, but I managed to spot one in a 'job lot' at an auction some years ago. It is always worth checking such lots in auctions in case they include something really rare. I have a I Model A which was standardised and converted to a Standard and the lens (without SN) seems to have been converted to a 7 O'Clock at that stage. I also picked up another such lens in a 'job lot' at auction. My 2 original I model Cs (both standardised) have lenses with the 11 O'Clock infinity position. That brass plate in place of the standard viewfinder is interesting. Have you any idea about why this was done?  Perhaps to hold the camera with the MIKAS in a stand or bracket of some kind for scientific or lab work?

William

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No idea about the brass plates replacing the viewfinders, William. The only point is that both Leica's were sold in Belgium and that - without firm confirmation - one at least was in the hands of a scientific linked to the Free University of Brussels. 

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