Jump to content
vikasmg

Please help me shoot the moon :-)

Recommended Posts

Advertisement (gone after registration)

I have a similar post on DP Review where you can see this pictures at higher resolution with their EXIF files.  See https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/62155942

This was my first try to shoot anything in the night sky. It was an unusually clear night (for Singapore in December) and I spotted this crescent already fairly high in the sky.  I had a new (used) Vario-Elmarit-SL 90-280mm mounted on a Leica CL, so I decided to move the tripod on to the terrace.

I'm not thrilled with the results and wondered if anyone could suggest if it can get better results.  The first shot is the full APS-C frame - so 430mm equivalent. The second shot is a crop from the same frame.

I do now realize that I could have lowered the ISO speed since the camera was already on a tripod.

 

Edited by vikasmg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That looks pretty good to me. To get substantially more definition ne3ds a much larger image size: you'll really need an 800mm lens (or longer) and a very solid tripod, very clear air. Exposure of the Moon itself is essentially a sunlight exposure, so set f/11 @ 1/ISO for it and watch for highlight saturation. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
vor 1 Stunde schrieb ramarren:

Exposure of the Moon itself is essentially a sunlight exposure,

Yes, because the moon doesn’t shine at all, it reflects. 😁

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, ramarren said:

That looks pretty good to me. To get substantially more definition ne3ds a much larger image size: you'll really need an 800mm lens (or longer) and a very solid tripod, very clear air. Exposure of the Moon itself is essentially a sunlight exposure, so set f/11 @ 1/ISO for it and watch for highlight saturation. 

Yes I realized a longer lens would have been useful.  However this is a rare photo type for me so it’s unlikeley I’ll go that route!  Thanks for your suggestions.

Edited by vikasmg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Focus is key...also solid tripod, having said that I have many moon and eclipse shots hand held.  Here are two hnd held shots both with Canon 5D2 and 100-400 mm lens

this one at iso 2500 F5.6 ( I would use around this aperture for new crescent waxing moon) full moon is different.

 

This one with Jupiter at at 200 mm same settings iso 2500 F5.6 and 1/750 

here is afully eclipsed moon

Iso 2500 F7.1 shutter 1 second on a tripod 400 mm 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

catching the moon at full moonrise is fun, here is one with canon 7D 400 mm lnes eq of 628 mm iso 2000 F7.1 1/80 shutter speed on a tripod...I use pohtographer's ephemeris app to know time and location (bearings) of moon rises etc

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Advertisement (gone after registration)

23 minutes ago, vikasmg said:

Yes I realized a longer lens would have been useful.  However this is a rare photo type for me so it’s unlikeley I’ll go that route!  Thanks for your suggestions.

There are many old manual focus long lenses that will do an excellent job on APS-C with dumb adapter. For me also Moon (and Jupiter/Saturn etc.) are curiosity object that is why I am also reluctant in getting "proper" lens/telescope to shoot them, however I have had good success with 400mm Telyt f6.8.  This lens is extremely sharp in the center and great for such shots. I have to add that for any long lens, one has to learn how to use properly (tripod, focusing, effect of turbulent air etc.). But it is fun to shoot. This is my Moon shot (without crop) with 400mm on APS-C.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will also add that long lens (400+) is useful only to get closeup shots. Many a times a Moon photo with lots of context looks much better. For those, your 280mm should be more than sufficient.

This one is 180mm f/3.4 on FF sensor M240 without crop.
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

another Leica M10 with Elmarit 135mm eclipsed moon on a very cloudy morning, January 2018  iso 3200 1/15 

Edited by tonyniev

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good advice all the above Vikas. When I shoot the moon, I use 1250mm of focal length, and end up with nearly the APSc chip covered.

Disagreeing slightly with the advice, clarity isn't the real essential at that longer focal length, stability is. Stability of the equipment obviously, and more so, stability of the atmosphere.

I've imaged in foggy conditions better than some "clear" nights, however this becomes more of an issue at longer than the focal lengths we are talking here.

Bear in mind you balcony will be above a hot asphalt area, and there will be thermals up and down, potentially destroying the image.

This is with the old T, and my 1250mm focal length scope. 1/800th sec, f5, ISO400.

Gary

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Post processing helps too- I am posting a super sharpened, exaggerated postprocessed moon image using Canon 5D2 400 mm iso 200 F11

and cropping using 400 mm here too

Edited by tonyniev

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, tonyniev said:

Post processing helps too- I am posting a super sharpened, exaggerated postprocessed moon image using Canon 5D2 400 mm iso 200 F11

and cropping using 400 mm here too

Although we normally only accept Leica images, I’ll let them stand as an illustration. But please use images within the forum  rules. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice picture Gary.

 

Post processing is tricky IMHO.  Tony's image is oversharpened and shows squiggly artifacts.  A lot of digi images show white spots and noise, or other problems.

 

One needs good lenses and perfect focus...and rigorous photographic technique for good moon pics.

 

Best pictures are usually at first or last quarter.  Full moon pics can look too flooded with light.

 

But it's always worth trying to get that pic which might rival NASA...🤣.

 

...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking at our full moon, my brother who was visiting from the West Coast said, "Well of course we see the other side."

Edited by pico

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, david strachan said:

Nice picture Gary.

 

Post processing is tricky IMHO.  Tony's image is oversharpened and shows squiggly artifacts.  A lot of digi images show white spots and noise, or other problems.

 

One needs good lenses and perfect focus...and rigorous photographic technique for good moon pics.

 

Best pictures are usually at first or last quarter.  Full moon pics can look too flooded with light.

 

But it's always worth trying to get that pic which might rival NASA...🤣.

 

...

Thank you Dave, it goes to show what can be achieved with a simple chip and a mirror or two.

To be honest, it is the simplicity of one shots like this that make it appealing. Most of my "serious" lunar shots are with a posh webcam, and using perhaps 500 to 1000 or more images, then stacked, and aligned, then all but the best discarded. A mono webcam too.

I'd post a sample, but it is not with Leica, and I don't want to incur the wrath of Jaap.

Gary

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, jmahto said:

There are many old manual focus long lenses that will do an excellent job on APS-C with dumb adapter. For me also Moon (and Jupiter/Saturn etc.) are curiosity object that is why I am also reluctant in getting "proper" lens/telescope to shoot them, however I have had good success with 400mm Telyt f6.8.  This lens is extremely sharp in the center and great for such shots. I have to add that for any long lens, one has to learn how to use properly (tripod, focusing, effect of turbulent air etc.). But it is fun to shoot. This is my Moon shot (without crop) with 400mm on APS-C.

 

Thanks.  Nice shot!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, jmahto said:

I will also add that long lens (400+) is useful only to get closeup shots. Many a times a Moon photo with lots of context looks much better. For those, your 280mm should be more than sufficient.

This one is 180mm f/3.4 on FF sensor M240 without crop.
 

I agree.  And nice shot!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, tonyniev said:

Focus is key...also solid tripod, having said that I have many moon and eclipse shots hand held.  Here are two hnd held shots both with Canon 5D2 and 100-400 mm lens

this one at iso 2500 F5.6 ( I would use around this aperture for new crescent waxing moon) full moon is different.

...

 

This one with Jupiter at at 200 mm same settings iso 2500 F5.6 and 1/750 

...here is afully eclipsed moon

Iso 2500 F7.1 shutter 1 second on a tripod 400 mm 

...

 

Wonderful.  Thanks for the information and assistance!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue., Read more about our Privacy Policy