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Leica D-Lux 7: Compact Size Meets High Performance

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Leica has announced the Leica D-Lux 7 a few minutes ago.

The official press release:

Zitat

Leica D-Lux 7: compact size meets high performance.
 
Wetzlar, 20 November 2018. Leica Camera AG presents a new model in the Leica D-Lux line. The high-performance compact camera features a fast Leica DC Vario-Summilux 10.9–34 mm f/1.7–2.8 ASPH. zoom lens (equivalent to 24–75 mm in 35 mm format) that, in combination with the camera’s new, higher-resolution four-thirds sensor, delivers outstanding picture quality in all shooting situations. A performance profile extended by numerous new functions and features such as a touchscreen display, Bluetooth connectivity and USB-C charging capability makes the new Leica D-Lux 7 an ideal everyday companion and an extremely versatile camera that offers a maximum of photographic freedom for capturing unique moments in impressive picture quality.
 
The familiar comprehensive features package of the Leica D-Lux line, with automatic exposure mode, manual setting options and a range of video functions, is ideally complemented by an integrated, 2.8-megapixel high-resolution electronic viewfinder, a WiFi module and Bluetooth connectivity. On the back of the Leica D-Lux 7, a 1.24-megapixel 3“ LCD touchscreen display not only makes the assessment of pictures much easier, but also allows fingertip control of the camera. For example, in addition to menu control, the focusing point can be set with a simple tap on the screen and pictures can be taken without having to touch any of its other controls.
 
The Leica DC Vario-Summilux 10.9–34 mm f/1.7–2.8 ASPH. zoom lens of the Leica D-Lux 7 (equivalent to 24–75 mm in 35 mm format) is perfectly matched to the camera’s new sensor. The fast initial aperture and the range of focal length make the camera particularly versatile in every situation – from portraits and landscapes to architecture, macro close-ups and street photography. With its 17-megapixel resolution and a maximum ISO sensitivity of 25600, the four-thirds sensor of the Leica D-Lux 7 is also ideal for capturing memorable moments in low ambient light in highest-quality pictures with natural colours and fine rendition of details.
 
Improvements to the camera’s hardware also include various additions to its range of functions. For example, the focus point of an exposures can be changed after shooting, or several exposures with different focus points can be superimposed on each other and merged with the aid of Focus Stacking, for instance to create a greater depth of focus in macro exposures. The camera’s capabilities have also been expanded to include video recording in 4K resolution – at a frame rate of up to 30 frames per second and 100 Mbit and in MP4 and AVCHD-format.
 
The Leica D-Lux 7 is the first camera of the D-Lux line that can be used together with the free Leica FOTOS App. This enables remote control of the camera from a smartphone and fast and easy wireless transfer of pictures from the Leica D-Lux 7 to iOS or Android devices for assessment. Photographers can then make use of numerous options for sharing their pictures directly in social media or after processing them with an image editing or postprocessing app.
 
As perfect complements to the classic looks of the Leica D-Lux 7, its users can choose from a collection of equally stylish and practical accessories such as exquisite cases, high-quality carrying straps and a practical handgrip.

 

Edited by LUF Admin
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Leica D-Lux 7 arrives in a stunning silver finish. Price £995 (Macfilos)

 

The long-awaited Leica D-Lux 7 is announced today and will be available from this week in what I think is a stunning silver-and-black finish. The last D-Lux came only in black (apart from special editions), and the decision to launch the D-Lux 7 in silver is a masterstroke. There is no news on a black version, although it could appear in the future. 

The silver anodised top plate transforms the rather drab Panasonic LX-100 Mk II (the basis of the D-Lux) into a very desirable piece of photographic equipment. It looks like a true mini Leica rather than a reworked Panasonic as did all previous D-Lux versions. There is also excellent news on price: £995, including VAT, is lower than I expected and is only £146 more expensive than the equivalent Panasonic. When desirability, the new silver finish and better resale values are taken into account, the Leica is a better long-term bet than the LX 100 II. Overall ownership cost is likely to be lower.

The overall design of the D-Lux shows that Leica has made a real effort to distance its model from the basic LX-100 Mk.II. Look closely, and the cameras are virtually identical, barring the loss of the Panasonic’s shallow hand grip, but the silver finish makes the camera.

As with the previous model, the D-Lux (in retrospect, this is now the D-Lux 6.5, halfway between the D-Lux 6 and the D-Lux 7) sports a cropped 4/3 sensor. Instead of the 2x of the standard micro four-thirds sensor, the D-Lux has a 2.2 crop. However, it is still significantly bigger than the 2.7x crop one-inch sensor.

The crop accounts for the new camera’s oddball 17 MP sensor. I believe this is probably the same 20MP sensor seen in other Panasonic m3/4 models; it’s just that less of it is used in picture taking. 

Despite the gestation period, the D-Lux 7 is not a huge set forward from the old model in technical terms. It retains the same (excellent) f/1.7-2.8 Summilux lens with a 35mm-equivalent zoom range of 24-75mm. The viewfinder is now a high-resolution 2.8MP device but keeps LCD technology rather than the more modern OLED display. The 3in, 1.24MP touch display is static, as with previous models, and this will be a disappointment to some buyers who had been expecting a cantilevered design.

In general, Panasonic (and thus Leica) has avoided change for change’s sake and has acknowledged that the previous model was pretty damned good. Above all, the D-Lux is a camera that appeals to the more experienced photographer, allowing full manual operation and a clear and traditional control set which covers all the necessary settings without having to consult to menus. The top plate carries dials for shutter speed and exposure compensation and a clearly marked on-off switch. An A(uto) shutter speed setting can be used in conjunction with variable manual apertures for aperture priority. Conversely, the A setting on the lens is used for shutter priority mode. Choosing both A settings puts the camera into fully automatic mode. 

As with previous models, the lens offers a slider switch to change the aspect ratio (3:2, 16:9, 1:1 and 4:3) which D-Lux users appreciate. As far as I know, this is a unique feature of the D-Lux models.

Leica has done a truly excellent job with the D-Lux 7, and it deserves to be successful. As a handy, compact travel camera with superb optics and image quality, it has few equals.

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I was a ex-Dlux typ109 user but i still like the compact size and I really wanted the touch screen in that time. So the new dlux 7 is full fill, after i heard that panasonic lx100 II releases i knew that leica dlux would be released later.

I can't wait for try it at shop in my country. :) 

PS. In my country there is the Dlux typ 109 safari edition and i hope this model will be sold that edition as well. 

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14 hours ago, heatlarx said:

I really like the dual tone color 😍

+1

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The big question is whether it’s a big enough jump in sensor performance for DL-109 owners to trade up or not. The gap between the DL-7 and the TL2/CL is not a small one, relative to the price of the DL, if you have to add lenses to the cost of the TL2/CL body.

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I have been using Leica cameras for the past 49 years. I just purchased the Dlux 7 and its the best compact Leica ever.

I can't believe the images coming out of this little camera.

 

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