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TrickyMrT

How to avoid dust in the M10?

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Hi,

 

I have an issue with dust in my M10. It is not this often ( Nearby zero ) that I change my lenses. I mostly shoot with my 35mm 1.4 FLE.

 

When I have changed a lens, i do a dust check. Of course, I check the glasses to make sure they are dust free.

 

If it is very sunny, I prefer to shoot with f11 or f16, but always when I see the images results, there is dust on the images.

 

What tips can you give to avoid dust in the M10?

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I come from Canon and I never had any dust problem as there is a built in mechanisme that vibrates the dust off the sensor. Leica does not have that and subsequently it is probably inevitable to get some dust onto the sensor. Sometimes this happens even through things that are inside the camera as aberation etc. In the beginning when I made that M10 test and found out that I had quite a lot of dust then I looked for liquid cleaning tools or alternatives. It took some time fot a decision on what to do. Happyly I came across a post here proposing some blower (baloon that you press in your hand). I looked for such a thing and found a Hama branded tool.

 

AND: It perfectly did the job. In the meantime I had dust again and again I could simpky blow it out.

 

So I hope that I do not get some sticky „dust“ that I can not blow out.

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I come from Canon and I never had any dust problem as there is a built in mechanisme that vibrates the dust off the sensor. Leica does not have that and subsequently it is probably inevitable to get some dust onto the sensor. Sometimes this happens even through things that are inside the camera as aberation etc. In the beginning when I made that M10 test and found out that I had quite a lot of dust then I looked for liquid cleaning tools or alternatives. It took some time fot a decision on what to do. Happyly I came across a post here proposing some blower (baloon that you press in your hand). I looked for such a thing and found a Hama branded tool.

 

AND: It perfectly did the job. In the meantime I had dust again and again I could simpky blow it out.

 

So I hope that I do not get some sticky „dust“ that I can not blow out.

Technically the dust isn’t on the sensor, but on the sensor cover glass. Fuji GFX users report hardly ever seeing dust. This is largely a result of placing its cover glass 9mm away from the sensor, so that even though the dust may be there, it is defocussed and not seen.

 

https://fujifilm-x.com/gbl/x-stories/gfx-technologies-2/

 

Jeff

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Dust is in the air all around us, all the time. Deal with it!

 

So true and permit my frequent observation: human skin is the source of much of dust, especially in the home or static workspace. We are dust emitters. When I see, for example, Leica assembly technicians handling the product without hair nets, face masks and gloves I have to wonder WTF are their standards?

Edited by pico

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Hi,

 

I have an issue with dust in my M10. It is not this often ( Nearby zero ) that I change my lenses. I mostly shoot with my 35mm 1.4 FLE.

 

When I have changed a lens, i do a dust check. Of course, I check the glasses to make sure they are dust free.

 

If it is very sunny, I prefer to shoot with f11 or f16, but always when I see the images results, there is dust on the images.

 

What tips can you give to avoid dust in the M10?

Hi Mr T

 

Not sure why you are shooting at f11 and f16? Not the best apertures as dust will show and resolution can degrade.

 

Try shooting at f5.6 or f8 for best lens resolution, and higher shutter speeds. Your dust problems will markedly reduce.

 

...

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I wrote a post about sensor cleaning for the S System page on this forum - since it is equally applicable to M10 sensor cleaning, I will repurpose it:

 

 

Here's an article I wrote about digital sensor cleaning for my blog.  I hope this will shed some light on the cleaning process. 

 

Having your sensor cleaned by the manufacturer or by a repair technician is a costly and needless expense and inconvenience;  it is something that every photographer would benefit from learning to do themselves. 

 

If you are on a month long photo expedition in _______________ (fill in the blank) and your sensor picks up debris on your first lens change, do you really want to come home with 20,000 images that must ALL be spotted in Photoshop or Lightroom?

 

 

 

Digital Camera Sensor Cleaning

 

Digital cameras have sensors; unless your camera has a built in dust reduction system, sooner or later your sensor will need to be cleaned - it's inevitable.  Then what?? 

 

It's a lot quicker, easier and less costly to do it yourself - if you follow your camera manual instructions exactly and are careful, you can successfully clean your camera's sensor yourself.  A lot of photographers fear damaging their sensor and will do about anything to avoid cleaning it themselves.  However, there is no reason to be afraid to do this procedure yourself, provided you do it properly.

 

You will need the right sensor cleaning supplies - I use Eclipse Optic Cleaning Fluid and Photosol Sensorswab Ultra sensor cleaning swabs.  If your camera has a full frame (24x36mm ) sensor, you will need the Type 3 swabs; they are 24 mm wide, as is your sensor.  APS-C and smaller sensors will need smaller swabs.  Photosol's website has information that will help you determine which swab is right for your camera.

 

One of the most important factors in successful sensor cleaning is to perform this procedure in a clean, dust free environment.  Not many of us have access to a clean room such as computer manufacturers build computers in.  If your home has airborne dust issues you will need to clean your sensor in an environment where dust is less of a problem (you can check for airborne dust by looking through the beam of a bright flashlight at night; if you see a lot of dust particles dancing in the air, you should probably go elsewhere to clean your sensor).  Where would that be?  Try a museum or a library; find a spot away from frequent foot traffic, entries and exits and away from heating and cooling ducts that will cause airflow that will stir up any dust that may be present.

 

Another important point is this - do not use compressed air ("canned air") to blow dust from your sensor before cleaning.  Canned air can spray liquid propellant onto your sensor cover glass, something you do not want to happen.  That liquid can also get behind the sensor and into the electronic components of your camera.  If that happens, you are in for a serious repair bill.  Instead of canned air, use a blower bulb like the Giottos Rocket Blaster, which will safely remove loose dust particles from your sensor.

 

The sensor swabs I use are dry, which means I need to apply the proper cleaning fluid to them before use.  Too much cleaning fluid can damage the electronics inside your camera, so proceed with caution.  I have found that four drops on the 24mm wide swabs my camera requires is sufficient (two drops on one side, two on the opposite side) applied right at the edge of the swab that will contact your sensor; give them 10 seconds to be wicked across the swab's edge so that the liquid is dispersed in a uniform manner.  Again, follow the directions that come with your swabs and cleaning fluid to the letter.

 

Each camera has a specific procedure for sensor cleaning; if you precisely adhere to the instructions in your camera manual, you should have a successful sensor cleaning result.  If there are still spots on your sensor after cleaning, you can re-clean the sensor provided your camera manual does not advise against doing so (I once ended up with an eyelash on my sensor that required two cleanings to remove; the first try simply moved it closer to the center of the sensor; this happens sometimes).

 

If you follow the directions in your camera manual and in your swab and cleaning fluid to the letter, you should have no problems cleaning your sensor at home (or at your local museum or library, if need be).

 

 

DISCLAIMER                                                                                                      

The above description of sensor cleaning is simply a description of how I clean my sensor; it is not intended as training or professional advice in sensor cleaning.  Always follow the directions in your camera manual and in your sensor cleaning materials to the letter.  When in doubt, contact your camera manufacturer for advice on sensor cleaning, or return your camera to the manufacturer's repair department for sensor cleaning.  The author accepts no responsibility for any damage resulting from do it yourself sensor cleaning.  When in doubt, contact your camera manufacturer to return your camera to the manufacturer's repair department for professional sensor cleaning.

Edited by Herr Barnack

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I feel yer pain. Just spent an hour or so today fiddling with all the usual implements: blower, the spinny brush, the sticky stick, lens swabs, etc.

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Put it in a zip lock bag and leave it on a shelf. That’ll control the dust.

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Put it in a zip lock bag and leave it on a shelf. That’ll control the dust.

 

Madness!  Madness, I say!! 

 

Everybody knows that to control dust, a digital M camera must be triple bagged in zip lock bags, with the zips alternately facing 180 degrees from one another and then put through one of these:  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00DI342IW/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B00DI342IW&linkCode=as2&tag=bestprodtag86535-20

 

It's the only way to be sure...

Edited by Herr Barnack

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I follow Jaap’s recommendation of a few years ago - I hold the camera upside down when changing lenses, and do so quickly.

 

I use the Giotto Rocket blower reasonably frequently. Then next level, if I think I have something the blower won’t remove, I use an Arctic Butterfly. It’s a brush with a lamp, and a little motor which spins it to shake out the dust.

 

If all esle fails, then I use a Sensor Swab, as Herr Barnack describes above. Camera and lens cleaning is something I do reasonably frequently, even for gear I haven’t used recently.

 

I’m afraid dust and other contamination goes with the territory.

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I follow Jaap’s recommendation of a few years ago - I hold the camera upside down when changing lenses, and do so quickly.

 

 

I'd consider that if sand was blowing around, or it's raining, but for everyday photography lenses should be changed like any other camera and learn to deal with dust and not overtly avoid it.

 

It is absolutely ridiculous the posts you read on the forum over time that say such things as 'I only ever change lenses indoors, why have I got dust?' or 'I change lenses in a plastic bag, why have I got dust?'. If nothing works to avoid dust then it shouldn't be impossible to work alongside a bit of dust in the air, and that is done by learning how to clean the sensor and not being a victim of 'I daren't, this is a £5000 camera!' I mean, you could drop it, it could get stolen, the dog might chew it, now that would make dust seem like a very small problem.

Edited by 250swb

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Actually, Jeff, the keepng it upside down when blowing has a dual purpose: To keep the dust you are blowing out from resettling on the sensor and to prevent new dust falling in.

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I agree that equipment is to be used, and used sensibly - it’s one thing to be quick and careful changing lenses, and quite another to be obsessive abiut it.

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Using two bodies with different lenses is my travel solution. But eventually, you will get dust on the sensor.

 

Although the Leica M10 does not have a sensor cleaning system, the dust detection feature actually works very well. It makes it easy to see if you have any dust on the sensor without using a computer. When I see dust, I use a Giotto bulb blower to blow the dust out. If the dust does not get removed, then I resort to using my VisibleDust brush. If that doesn't remove the dust, I use the Eyelead Sensor cleaner to remove the stubborn particles. However, the blower usually does the job on the first try.

 

When I change lenses, I blow off the camera end of the lens being attached, then point the camera to the ground, remove the existing lens and then attached the new lens. I blow off the back of the lens just removed before putting on the end cap. I also don't change lenses in dusty or windy conditions without seeking shelter first.

 

It is also a good idea to vacuum out your camera bag regularly to minimize dust and grit collecting the in recesses of your bag.

 

Regards,

Bud James
 
Please check out my fine art and travel photography at www.budjames.photography or on Instagram at www.instagram.com/budjamesphoto.

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I’ve built a vacuum tent in the garden just for changing lenses on the Leica.

 

2A64F8F5-5508-457D-AEBA-473D739B2363.jpeg

 

Wonderful garden. I love old trees :-)

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Dust is in the air all around us, all the time. Deal with it!

Just got back from an overseas assignment for the week, I log on to see what is going on in Leica land, check out this thread and then read this and other snarky comments.

 

I just don’t get it, seems being a jerk to people is a rite of passage on here, what a bleak place.

Edited by Reciprocity

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Although the Leica M10 does not have a sensor cleaning system, the dust detection feature actually works very well. 

 

I didn't realize this was a feature until now - I thought the menu item was just saying, "go take a defocused pic."

 

My SOP is to fire up MS Word, full-screen it on a white page, set to f/16, set to ISO 100, set to 1s, and take a close-up pic at infinity. The ultimate detector is the "visualize spots" tool in Lightroom, but I find that playing back the image and walking around it while zoomed in-camera is pretty good. Will actually try using this method sometime, esp. when I already know I've got a problem.

 

If the M10-P added a dust vibration feature, that would be the most-tempting aspect of the upgrade for me. I've been using digital cameras for a while, and never had to sensor-clean prior to Leica.

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