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How can I save from a processed DNG file to TIFF within Lightroom CC (Cloud version)? If it is not possible, could someone tell me if it is possible with Lightroom Classic?

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In LR classic You can export the dng file as a tiff file. Use the export function.

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In LR classic You can export the dng file as a tiff file. Use the export function.

Thanks. From what I can tell, only Lightroom Classic is capable of exporting to TIFF files. That and the reduced capabilities of Lightroom CC is enough to make me switch to Classic.

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Thanks. From what I can tell, only Lightroom Classic is capable of exporting to TIFF files. That and the reduced capabilities of Lightroom CC is enough to make me switch to Classic.

No. That is the way Lightroom has always worked.

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Because you have Lightroom CC, you also have real Photoshop CC.  Open the image in Photoshop (File/Open), go to File/Save As, pick the folder you want the file in and select TIFF.  None of that "export" nonsense jargon.  No cloud storage.

 

Bridge / Photoshop CC is a no-brainer for me.  I don't want the dumbed down functionality of Lightroom.

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I sometimes use LR for a quick web posting; in general, I keep coming back to Photoshop. But we must accept that it is a steep and long learning curve; not everybody is prepared to walk that road.

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My Photoshop training was Kelby's "The Adobe Photoshop Book for Digital Photographers", which includes Bridge.  If Lightroom users are familiar with Kelby's "The Adobe Photoshop Lightroom Book for Digital Photographers", they will get the same presentation of material in the Photoshop book.  Some Lightroom users may not know that the Develop Module in Lightroom is just Adobe Camera Raw (ACR) with some minor exceptions.  ACR is what you get to when you double click on an image in Bridge.  All the other power of Photoshop can be learned later as features are needed.

 

The newest version of Bridge includes Libraries.   The Library module in Lightroom and Bridge seem to be converging too.

 

The four output modules in Lightroom are certainly easier to use for those tasks.

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Yes, but then you proceed to Martin Evening, Jeff Schewe, Bruce Fraser and Dan Margulis - and it turns out that Kelby was somewhat simplified.

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Yes, Scott Kelby is simplified.  But he is a great starting point.  The full power of Photoshop, the things Lightroom can't do, requires a higher level of teaching from the masters you list.

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Posted (edited)

 in general, I keep coming back to Photoshop. But we must accept that it is a steep and long learning curve; not everybody is prepared to walk that road.

 

....... well I keep stumbling and sliding back down the hill...... it is all so unintuitive and so many functions are hidden away that by the time I've come round to doing things again I've completely forgotten how to and have to trawl the internet for yet another tutorial ..... which invariably shows a different method or some variation that rings no bells at all.  

 

like all computer programs that have evolved over time with endless bits being bolted on, it seems to suffer from a muddled interface and menu system.

 

It would be better if split up into specific modules starting 'I want to .....' which then sequentially walk you down a pathway to what you want to achieve in that part of the process ..... then you can pick the next thing you want to do.

 

OK, so it's an idiots version of a subset of PS ...... but it would certainly help infrequent users 

Edited by thighslapper

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Good user interface design is an impossible task. If you make it configurable to any users liking then no new users would be able to start. If you make it intuitive for beginners then it will bug the crap out of experienced users.

With photoshop which I infrequently need I always have to find a tutorial but some things I would like to do I can’t find the words to describe to the search engine.

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Thighslapper, please go to the library or bookstore and look at Kelby's books.  They are exactly what you are asking for.  They are not a books to read.  You find the pages covering what you want to do and Scott sequentially walks you down a pathway to what you want to achieve.  He even gives all the slider positions in addition to the exact key strokes.  There is a robust index to find what you are trying to achieve.

 

Designing a user interface is indeed hard.  Photoshop is not designed for photographers; it is designed for professional image preparation.  Newer versions are becoming a little more oriented to photographers.  The professionals can work with Photoshop amazingly quickly with the current interface.  A sequential step approach would slow them down appreciably.  Once you've learned some of the myriad of hot key combinations you can fly through routine tasks. 

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