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I've shot some film over the last few months and developed at home.  Partly because I want to improve my developing technique and partly to slow down the picture taking process, i.e., more concentration looking for interesting subjects and composition.  I just went on vacation and took an MP and M-P.  I hauled them both the first day and used only digital so the MP sat in the hotel for the rest of the trip so I could carry less weight.  The reason for going digital was I wanted flexibility with ISO because I just never new what kind of light I'd be in and I didn't want to spoil opportunities.  Having said all that, I am culling 400 shots taken over five days.  So far it looks like I'd been fine with ISO 400 film except for one night at a bar and an aquarium.  For those of you going strictly with film, how do you compensate for drastic changes in light when you are mid-roll?  Just waste the rest of the roll and start a fresh roll and push two or three stops?

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There are several strategies.

1. Carry a spare bo0dy loaded with alternative iso film.

2. Use ND filter to slow down high iso in bright light.

3. Stand develop and expose at any iso on the same roll.

Each has their virtues and pitfalls.

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There are several strategies.

1. Carry a spare bo0dy loaded with alternative iso film.

2. Use ND filter to slow down high iso in bright light.

3. Stand develop and expose at any iso on the same roll.

Each has their virtues and pitfalls.

And/or:

 

1. Get a Noctilux.

2. Use a flash.

3. Exploit existing lighting creatively.

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There will be opportunities that ask for more guts & knowledge as a film shooter than digital does. But thats part of the fun & experience.

 

I would go for:

1.) trying to shoot it and use something in the bar / aquarium that you can use as a tripod;

2.) carry a second film body/camera (maybe just a compact) with higher ASA;

3.) take the Noctilux for a walk;

4.) don't photograph that specific moment;

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If you forget the shadows 400 can easily be pushed towards 800 and in available light that's mostly what we prefer. Or follow lambda's work here on the forum with the slogan 'fuck the midtones'

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What I do in such situations is carefully rewind the roll that is in the camera so that the film end still sticks out and take note at which exposure number I was at. then use a different film and finish the other roll later. I usually leave an empty frame in between so when I take out a roll after frame 18 i forward it to frame 20 when putting it back in. Really easy and not a big hassle at all.

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I couldn't have said it better.

 

Why do people need to be so binary? 

 

 

Ouroboros, on 08 Aug 2018 - 09:52, said:

I never left film. I added digital to my existing skills.

 

 

 

 

I'm binary.

 

I feel some sort of pride when people write/cry out loud "I use ONLY film" : that is nice, and ...

 

Myself, I almost arrived to film only some years ago, but never be there.

- as decades user of Kodachrome if this film was available, maybe (as when I used only that film before digital age)

- Velvia comes close but becomes more and more expensive and very difficult to have

- Provia same "troubles" as Velvia

 

- now I use what I have learned to use for some years "digital M" and other brands

- my film stuffs become second choice

 

- I can write now that I'm proud to use film only when there was no digital by then

Edited by a.noctilux

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Now that I have given up digital, I am able to use film... solely.

In my humble opinion, film offers more than digital does. If you would like to reach at the top resolution, you had better go on to Adox CMS 20 II. Or, you may prefer Cinestill 50D while the sun shining. Moreover, I believe in it that none of the digital bodies can achieve the renowned look of Tri-X.

Edited by odeon

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I've shot some film over the last few months and developed at home.  Partly because I want to improve my developing technique and partly to slow down the picture taking process, i.e., more concentration looking for interesting subjects and composition.  I just went on vacation and took an MP and M-P.  I hauled them both the first day and used only digital so the MP sat in the hotel for the rest of the trip so I could carry less weight.  The reason for going digital was I wanted flexibility with ISO because I just never new what kind of light I'd be in and I didn't want to spoil opportunities.  Having said all that, I am culling 400 shots taken over five days.  So far it looks like I'd been fine with ISO 400 film except for one night at a bar and an aquarium.  For those of you going strictly with film, how do you compensate for drastic changes in light when you are mid-roll?  Just waste the rest of the roll and start a fresh roll and push two or three stops?

I went for 2+ weeks, two countries trip in 2016 September-October. Used 400 BW film at box speed. With M4-2 and 35 2.5 Leica lens.

I used ten or so rolls. It means one roll for morning, day, indoors and night. No flash, no filters.

It worked for me. This is scenario number one.

 

 

 

 

Scenario number two. From November to February I rate ISO 400 film as 1600 or 3200.

I started with two filters. Bright light - orange x3 filter. Overcast x2 ellow filter.

I was changing ISO at my meter accordingly. But then I just used clean filter.

I'm not into details of shadows photography, but for pictures with something else.

 

 

 

 

Yet, if I want fine tuned negative it is scenario number three. Use film as long as here is enough light.

It means regular livable indoors and morning, day outside. Once Sun or light it down here is nothing to photograph under this scenario.

 

 

 

HCB did it with f3.5 lens and very slow film. Yet, it was revolutionary.

Do not afraid to face same revolution again. Film is not digital. Do not afraid to handheld at 1/2. Film for some unknown reason handles it well.

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Now that I have given up digital, I am able to use film... solely.

In my humble opinion, film offers more than digital does. If you would like to reach at the top resolution, you had better go on to Adox CMS 20 II. Or, you may prefer Cinestill 50D while the sun shining. Moreover, I believe in it that none of the digital bodies can achieve the renowned look of Tri-X.

I'm digin Kodak 50D @20 in Rodinal.

 

/applications/core/interface/imageproxy/imageproxy.php?img=https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1882/42505634150_eb18e9336a_o.jpg&key=e5d440dca4bc5b9c19fd029f5aa66084530062274083685ecbc9555d99a429c4">

 

 

Negatives this way are totally printable under enlarger.

 

/applications/core/interface/imageproxy/imageproxy.php?img=https://rangefinder.ru/glr/data/1914/EOS3001635LK50Dr8x10_Aug18729.jpg&key=f31139f8d4d2cb39e236fa98405990665c058d346c54d95c95e74614b6c57bc8">

 

BTW, about film only. Now with batteries restrictions if I'll go for three, four days trip and have camera with me, I rather take film camera.

No hassle with single battery or check-in luggage.

Edited by Ko.Fe.

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I sold my Leica M 240 earlier this year after 3½ years (and some of my favourite images too, don't get me wrong).

 

At some point recently, I took it out and shot some photos but found that when I imported them, I just felt nothing. It was too instant and virtual, and the truth was that for years I had been using VSCO Film and Silver Efex because I never liked the standard look of digital images anyway, so why cheat myself?

 

When I shoot film, there is so much rich tactical craft involved in loading, advancing, developing, scanning, also the grain, the B&W and colour tone and latitude that I get no satisfaction from using digital cameras these days, except professionally and to scan my film with.

 

So a few months ago I just decided enough was enough. Just shoot film and deal with the challenges.

 

Below: Leica M7, 35mm Voigtländer F1.7 Ultron Asph, Kodak Portra 160

 

Edited by Nick Bedford

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I only use film. I prefer it.

 

I like printed images. Whether from the next roll of colour neg film or from my darkroom. I could make these with a digital camera but I prefer this way.

 

Without a print, I don’t feel like anything happened but then no one except me could care less about any photo i made.

 

Enjoy your prints or your projections, however you made them.

 

-----------

 

Same here.  Just  a matter of personal preference. And looking at screens eventually tires my eyes. Really enjoyed the movie, Kodachrome, as I'm almost strictly analog. Ed Harris used his own M4-P in the film.

 

What counts is what you see, not how or with what you capture what you see. 

 

Gut licht!

Edited by BlkWhiteFilmPix

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I know exactly how you feel. I tried shooting the "medium format" Fuji GFX 50S in store and felt nothing. It wasn't exciting at all.

 

When I shoot Tri-X on a Leica, it's the opposite.

 

I was wondering how many of you quit shooting digital and only shoot on film?

 

I quit shooting digital in 2014 and only shoot B&W film (even holidays). And it was my best choice in photography, besides switching to Leica rangefinder (i started with a M9).

 

Now and then i read some posts in the non-film topics and it's all about megapixels, resolution and the next digital M. I'm so happy that not my interest anymore.

 

How about you?

Edited by Nick Bedford

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For many years, I tried to blend film with digital but I failed miserably. I now shoot only film.There was nothing wrong either with the equipment or the images. It was the actual shooting process that bothered me. I progressively stopped worrying about light, exposure, and framing, leaving any corrections to PS. And I felt like a robot inside the camera was taking care of everything. Well, that's nonsense, right? At least for me.

 

Do I have remorse? Occasionally, I admit it, yes. Sometimes I miss the sharpness and the bright colours from the M9 or its immediateness. Or, worse, when I check my bank account. But, I don't go back.

 

Paul

 

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I dumped digital of all kinds about 5 years ago.  I really can't stand it, mainly b/c I don't have a PHD in graphic arts.

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I dumped digital of all kinds about 5 years ago.  I really can't stand it, mainly b/c I don't have a PHD in graphic arts.

You don't need a phd  in graphic arts,(or anything) . One's natural talent that you already employ in film technologies is enough qualification. Anything more than that is just 'noise', IMO. I happily and necessarily indulge both disciplines. The skill is in deciding which to use today. Even that decision helps focus concentration.

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Very true. I still shoot digital for professional jobs myself because I don't have a stake in the results and often have to shoot for client variety of choice, get proofs out for selection and get paid. I would only shoot film if the client was aware of it and insisted on it.

 

Shooting film in 2018 for me is a very personal choice of craft.

 

You don't need a phd  in graphic arts,(or anything) . One's natural talent that you already employ in film technologies is enough qualification. Anything more than that is just 'noise', IMO. I happily and necessarily indulge both disciplines. The skill is in deciding which to use today. Even that decision helps focus concentration.

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I shoot some time and some projects only with film, using two bodies: M7/M6 or Bessa III and a Contax T3 (the later is still in use). Often one was loaded with b/w film, the other with color, or different ISO films. Problem solved. I never liked any ISO 400 films and they are a compromise either way.

 

Noctilux is fine, but not always is the DOF at f/1.0 what you want (and for the price I would get a medium format body anyway).


 

Edited by Peter_S

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You don't need a phd  in graphic arts,(or anything) . One's natural talent that you already employ in film technologies is enough qualification. Anything more than that is just 'noise', IMO. I happily and necessarily indulge both disciplines. The skill is in deciding which to use today. Even that decision helps focus concentration.

Erl - I was referring to professional landscape work, and of course exaggerating a tiny bit. I just feel that a film workflow evens the playing field to traditional photography skills. Oh, and I forgot the pilots license that you also need...those drones are getting mighty sophisticated!

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