Jump to content

OTHER RANGEFINDERS...


Recommended Posts

Advertisement (gone after registration)

One may also mention the Paxette series. This one with a wonderful Steinheil Kreuznach Xenar.
Taken with Leica M240, Staeble Telon 85mm, one of the Paxette lenses.

 

Welcome, dear visitor! As registered member you'd see an image here…

Simply register for free here – We are always happy to welcome new members!

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

.....Stereo GAS Attack underway with the addition of a Mint Wollensak 10 Stereo Camera.   This camera was made by Revere, on the same cast aluminum shell as its own Revere 33.   Main difference is fancy finish, deeply embossed black leather (Nice. Ez to grip!). Much better lenses, a f 2.7 35mm Amaton Tessar, made,?of course by Wollensak, as was the upgraded shutter with 1/200 top speed.   The camera focuses using a disc knob top right, the lenses remain stationary and the film crate moves against a spring pressure plate.   The Shutter Release is the Absolute Nicest I’ve ever felt on Any Camera!   You do Not move the camera pressing. It.  Visible as the base of the viewfinder is a bubble level, as holding the camera exactly horizontal endures beautiful 3D viewing.   I’ve gotten a few stereo cameras, and “Wally”, is the Nicest. BTW this is the Only still camera to bear the Wollensak name.  Four thousand were made in 1955.   

Welcome, dear visitor! As registered member you'd see an image here…

Simply register for free here – We are always happy to welcome new members!

Link to post
Share on other sites

22 minutes ago, Ambro51 said:

.....Stereo GAS Attack underway with the addition of a Mint Wollensak 10 Stereo Camera.   

Nice! My own preference was the Stereo Realist, as that’s what my dad used for about 30 years. He got me one as my first 35mm camera, and I used it in late High School and into college. Still have mine and his, along with his slide collection and stereo projector.

Might have to try the new Ektachrome in one...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well my gas attack has caused the purchase of 6 Realists.   I can Fix them!  Clean them etc.    I’ve been toying with removing the top and front plates and have them satin black powder coated!  I just bought very low serial number A67XX off the bay.   This early version has supposedly superior Ilex Paragon lenses.   Probably late ‘47- early ‘48..  also I’ve managed to get all the Realist mounting “stuff” plus a green button view.

Edited by Ambro51
Link to post
Share on other sites

Not a REAL rangefinder, but a weird and wonderful LTM camera: The Corfield Periflex Gold Star.

Lens: Lumax 1.9/45. Optical viewfinder. Everything appears to be made out of aluminium. Apparently, after the war, this was recovered from scrap airplane frames, making it the easiest to obtain.

To focus, a little reflex periscope descends into the light path. Unfortunately it is mirrored. :(

 

 

 

 

 

 

Welcome, dear visitor! As registered member you'd see an image here…

Simply register for free here – We are always happy to welcome new members!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Gotta Love a Great Big Honking Flash Gun!!!!! 

Welcome, dear visitor! As registered member you'd see an image here…

Simply register for free here – We are always happy to welcome new members!

Edited by Ambro51
Link to post
Share on other sites

Advertisement (gone after registration)

Ever see a Black Paint Stereo Realist????? 

Welcome, dear visitor! As registered member you'd see an image here…

Simply register for free here – We are always happy to welcome new members!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow really scored two beautiful Realist items.  Not Cheap.   Camera is a Virtually NOS 2.8 Stereo Realist, Beautiful overall Very late production made in 1968!   And to accompany it this Awesome set of Steinheil Munchen 25 mm Stereo-Redufocus lenses, beautifully engineered specifically for the Realist, and works perfectly with the f 2.8 35mm David White Anastigmat lenses, s 4 element Tessar design.    •••. It all works superbly together.  The camera operates as normal, the 25mm wide angle finder is on the base, as is where the Realist viewfinder is normally.   The view is big and bright!  It looks superb in the black one too but that’s a 3.5.  This camera supports a modern flash. Depth of field.....f 16-  1’- infinity!  It works well on a tripod as well.  

Welcome, dear visitor! As registered member you'd see an image here…

Simply register for free here – We are always happy to welcome new members!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Revue 400 SE - (sold under this name in Germany but seems to be built by Konica):

 

Welcome, dear visitor! As registered member you'd see an image here…

Simply register for free here – We are always happy to welcome new members!

Link to post
Share on other sites

A New Addition, the  Stereo Realist Custom.  This late production variant is a separate model (1050) and a highly upgraded top line camera.,   Introduced in 1959, at the tail end of the Stereo Craze, it was a Pretty Face, with significant differences from the standard Realist (which was being built concurrently.     Overall the camera was built with more care, such as finer matching of the mechanicals for smoother operation,  the large rewind and advance knobs of the 2.8 are used, the counter features a ribbed center for easier fingertip resetting, the counter runs reverse from all other Realists, counting down images remaining.  The focus wheel has a bit more resistance and click stop advance.  The outer covering is a Beautiful strong grained black gloss kangaroo leather.  The faceplate and top plate are bright satin brushed (beautiful ).    The big story are the incredible lenses.  Made by Steinheil in Germany these 4 element Tessar lenses are formulated using “Rare Earth”.  Probably a trace radioactive, with a different blue coating than most Realist lenses.  These lenses are individually and carefully matched for optimum stereo capability, and when installed were set to exact focus with a ground glass and microscope.  The lenses have resolution of 300 lines per mm.   Aperature is from 2.8  to 22 continuously variable, set by turning the beveled knob.  The flip up Bakelite lens cap has a brushed satin faceplate, modernist mid century update, and very pleasing to the eye., there’s a warm, tactfully delightful feel to the leather body.  The back leather is rounded just so slightly..  Total production was 2500 units, from 1959-196? ). They came new in a high quality lidded box.>>>>> this is what separates an $80 model 1041 Realist from the $800 model 1050 Custom.   (Now, to actually use both and seek differences will be interesting).  

Welcome, dear visitor! As registered member you'd see an image here…

Simply register for free here – We are always happy to welcome new members!

Welcome, dear visitor! As registered member you'd see an image here…

Simply register for free here – We are always happy to welcome new members!

Welcome, dear visitor! As registered member you'd see an image here…

Simply register for free here – We are always happy to welcome new members!

Edited by Ambro51
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
On 12/23/2018 at 1:33 PM, schattenundlicht said:

After a little excursion to the other side of the globe (Chris Sherlock, NZ, one of the last remaining Kodak trained service technicians) my late father's Retina IIa is functionally as good as new! I did not have her restored cosmetically, because it was actively used it for three decades all over the world. Many childhood memories are attached to slideshows of my father's exotic work related travels. One of the very few material mementos that I posses of him. The many more immaterial ones are those that count, however. A bit of Christmas melancholy...

 

Kodak Retina IIa, ca. 1952 manufactured at the former Nagel cameraworks in Stuttgart, Germany. Rodenstock Heligon 50 mm f/2.

Thank you for the reminder. Somewhere I have the Kodak Retina IIIc that my father passed on to me when I left NZ in 1983. That camera travelled with me on the new life I embarked upon in the Australian outback and desert.

I shall have to (remotely) begin the search for where it is currently resting. It was a beautiful camera to use, and I’m sure it will be again.

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Over the last 25 I've used a lot different cameras.  Not based on need; just wanted different user experiences.  Although I've used most of the Leica film rangefinders, I've had experience with pre-war Contax II and their post-war Kiev counterparts, including the III.  Fun cameras, and some ways still better then a Leica -- longer rangefinder base, biggest rangefinder patch.  You can see why the pre-war con tax was such a revolutionary camera.  Nikons, including many S2 and one original S3.  I liked the S2 but they didn't like my spectacles.  Chewed the lenses, as did the Contax and Kieve.  The S3 rangefinder patch, however was a bit of a disappointment.  Faded with little contrast.  Super Ikonta B too, post pre-war and post-war.  Compact with big negatives.  

Probably a few others too.  Enough to make me realize that what was unique about Leica was not their optics.  I once had 50mm lenses in the house from the late 50's from Leica, Nikon and Zeiss, multiple samples too (1Z, 2L, 3-4N), and in terms of optical quality, Zeiss > Nikkor >/= Leica.  But what really was unique about Leica was their viewfinders.  Just so much better.  The M3 trounced what before (and afterwards), and the Leicaflex SL remains probably the best viewfinder I have used in an SLR.  Anyway, for me I shoot Leica because of their viewfinders.

Edited by SteveYork
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • jaapv unpinned this topic

A "new" lens for my Contax. A fairly rare 1933-34 black & nickel rigid 50mm f2 Sonnar. There is a connection to Leica in that I could use it on my Cook & Perkins Contax/Leica adaptor.

 

Welcome, dear visitor! As registered member you'd see an image here…

Simply register for free here – We are always happy to welcome new members!

Edited by Pyrogallol
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 3 years later...

Other rangefinders I've used -- Nikon S2, S3, Zeiss Ikon II, IIa, III, Contessa, Super Ikonta B, both pre and post war, Canon L1, and Fed, Zorki, Kiev.

Best values are probably the early Zeiss Ikon II and III, 1950's Kiev and any Canons.  

The Leicas have the best viewfinders by a wide margin.  

The Nikon S2 was a very cool, easy to use camera, but I'm not a 50mm guy.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

This could become a favorite. Same size as my M2. The lens is razor sharp wide open. My first copy had a seized aperture wide open, which is why I am familiar with its sharpness. The one pictured I recently acquired, but am having issues with the film transport, which is why I cautiously said "could become a favorite". VF not as bright as a Leica M. Near the same weight though.

 

Welcome, dear visitor! As registered member you'd see an image here…

Simply register for free here – We are always happy to welcome new members!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Canon 7s, luckily (or on purpose?) it's LTM, so I could adapt those lenses for my M
Previously shot with Fujifilm Xpro2, and that just might be a reason why I finally bought Leica.

I also own Yashica Lynx 1000, but that one is only for prop. Probably would work, but haven't show any rolls with it.

Edited by kkumpu
Added mention about Yashica
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...