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Digiscoping with the M10


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#1 jimleicam3

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Posted 27 June 2018 - 22:39

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Loving my M 10, my family and I are bird watchers and are going to invest into a spotting scope. I have always been a big fan of Swarovski Optics and we are looking at an ATX scope.  However,  I am having trouble locating a adapter to attach the camera and scope. 

 

Can I only use a M10 with a Leica scope?

 

Is anyone using a M camera with any kind of spotting scope?

 

Cheers,

 

 



#2 magixaxeman

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Posted 28 June 2018 - 21:35

In short you can use an M10 with any scope that has a T2 mount, just buy the Leica T2 mount and screw it to an scope with a T2 mount, that includes the ATX



#3 richardlipow

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Posted 28 June 2018 - 22:01

I have a 85mm Swaro STX and BTX...it's really difficult to focus with anything but an iPhone... 



#4 Whitford

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Posted 29 June 2018 - 06:23

I’ll never forget the first time I used a pair of Swarovski binoculars. My god, if only they made camera lenses...
  • jimleicam3 said thank you to this

#5 noudecart

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 23:16

I have just purchased the Televid 82 to use with the M10, and am finding it very difficult to focus even when using the visoflex. I also cant seem to get focus peaking working with this setup either. Any advice on what I am doing wrong? Or hints on how to get sharp images? I am using a timer, on a tripod etc but the pics are still blurry. Was hoping to use this for distance shots of nature and the moon. Any advice appreciated. Thanks



#6 richardlipow

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Posted 09 July 2018 - 00:38

I have just purchased the Televid 82 to use with the M10, and am finding it very difficult to focus even when using the visoflex. I also cant seem to get focus peaking working with this setup either. Any advice on what I am doing wrong? Or hints on how to get sharp images? I am using a timer, on a tripod etc but the pics are still blurry. Was hoping to use this for distance shots of nature and the moon. Any advice appreciated. Thanks

 

It's very difficult to obtain a clear photo using a spotting scope.  As above I have only had a moderate success with an iPhone.  That said, you need an extremely sturdy tripod and try to use the highest shutter speed possible.  I use a Canon with an EF 600mm lens for distance and will not even attempt such exposures with a rangefinder.



#7 Jared

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 16:43

I have just purchased the Televid 82 to use with the M10, and am finding it very difficult to focus even when using the visoflex. I also cant seem to get focus peaking working with this setup either. Any advice on what I am doing wrong? Or hints on how to get sharp images? I am using a timer, on a tripod etc but the pics are still blurry. Was hoping to use this for distance shots of nature and the moon. Any advice appreciated. Thanks


There are two challenges to taking a decent shot through any type of telescope, and one additional challenge for spotting scopes.

With any telescope you need a very, very stable mount for a decent shot. You’re typically working a 400mm or more and that means even tiny motions will be easily visible. Best results are by combining a self timer—set to more than2s—with a sturdy tripod.

The second issue with any telescope is to nail the focus. This just takes patience and Live View—with magnification. Keep in mind focus will shift with time as temperatures change, so just because your focus was correct an hour ago doesn’t mean it is still correct. Also keep in mind the focus will shift a bit with atmospheric conditions, so it can be helpful to take multiple shots and look for the best one. There will be some variation in focus from moment to moment.

Speaking of atmospheric conditions, that brings us to the last issue that is specific to spotting scopes: seeing conditions. You are usually imaging things at a great distance with high magnification. That means you are looking through a lot of air, and it’s mostly air that is close to the ground. This air is subject to effects from heat and this blurs images badly. Different times of day, different days, and different moments in time will produce dramatically different results. Learn your conditions. Often dawn is better than mid day or sunset. Looking over asphalt is worse than looking over grass and dirt. Again, variations from moment to moment can produce wildly different results, so try a bunch of images.

#8 tobey bilek

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 20:14

Adding to all this,  vibration can not be stopped with any long lens on a tripod.  Electronic shutter will help providing no wind, still air,  and no vibration from traffic which leaves out tall buildings and bridges.

 

two solutions I have used successfully are  dual tripods, one for the lens,  one for camera.  This is a PITA but do it and it proves what the problems are. Dual pods are a solution 100 years old.  The second is an adjustable arm from camera to one tripod leg.  Also trouble.  Manfrotto made mine 20 years ago and may or may not still be available.

 

Nature people use gimbal mounts for birding etc.  No personal experience.  

 

With one Nikon lens,  I wedge a cork between tripod foot and lens and that stops that one source of instability.  Closing diaphragm and raising mirror works to 1/125 sec.  Blurs occurred 1/60 and slower with single tripod.

 

You might check with Really Right Stuff and see if they have a solution.



#9 jaapv

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 20:48

Suspending something heavy from the tripod also helps. Some tripods have a hook at the bottom of the central column.


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#10 JAC

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 21:48

Not trying to hijack the thread but do users generally prefer the current top of the line Leica scopes or Swaro?  I'm in the market for a scope.  I have Swaro binocs and they are amazing.  Thanks



#11 jdlaing

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 23:43

Not trying to hijack the thread but do users generally prefer the current top of the line Leica scopes or Swaro?  I'm in the market for a scope.  I have Swaro binocs and they are amazing.  Thanks


I’d say if you gave a choice to most users it would be 50/50 Leica/Swarovski. Or 33/33/33 Leica/Swarovski/Schmidt & Bender.

Having said that if price were not a deciding factor.


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