Jump to content

GDPR – How it affects the Leica Forum


Recommended Posts

I will be signing up as a Premium member.  GDPR resulted from the absolute disregard of an individual's privacy by many web companies.  I am personally concerned about the activity of Google Analytics, a known privacy offender.  I am a resident of the United States and appreciate the positive impact GDPR is having globally because the US Congress is too gutless to do anything.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder about VigiLink - blocking it results in links not working on this site.

 

Google Analytics have been blocked for years on my computers, I don't trust anything coming from that Moloch.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Advertisement (gone after registration)

Andreas,

 

Thank you for the hard graft you've been putting in behind the scenes on our behalf to ensure GDPR compliance.

 

I sincerely hope that GDPR does not spell the end for posting portraits or street pictures on the forum.  I work for an organisation that is heavily affected by GDPR and has provided training in compliance.  None of the training indicated that GDPR includes facsimiles of people or photographic portraiture unless it's 'tagging' of people through social media sites such as FaceBook where an individual's name can be added to an automatic 'balloon'.  I understand that it is now possible to prevent tagging of yourself by others through the site's Privacy settings.

 

I personally would not, and have not, identified anyone in pictures I have posted on the forum without their consent, particularly at meetings of forum members, out of politeness and common decency and because I would not wish them to identify me other than by my forum name.

 

Might I suggest new forum guidance or perhaps a 'hard rule', if one is appropriate, preventing people from identifying persons in their pictures where they don't have consent?  That might just tip the balance in favour of GDPR compliance or at least help you show you are doing your best to stay on the right side of the Regulations.

 

Pete.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Andreas,

 

I apologize if this question is repetative or has been asked and answered in other parts of the forum. You mention that when "publishing portraits and street photos to exercise particular sensitivity". I wonder if there is some additional clarity. For example, a photo of a child amoung others in a playground. A photo of a street scene which includes a variety of people... perhaps with two of them kissing or otherwise displaying affection in public. Photographs which might otherwise be newsworthy of for example civil disturbance.

 

I understand that there may not be good answers to these questions which protect the Forum and yourself. I value highly the work you, the moderators and all posting members do and want to see this forum continue.

 

Any guidence would be apreciated.

Edited by tollie
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thinking back to the earlier internet, about 1990, we were optimistic regarding its benign philosophy, "Share what you know, ask when you do not." There were so many ways to scour sites for users with things like 'finger', 'who' (one version I wrote very early on), and even Altavista had a hole you could drive a truck through, dumping all DEC employees' names. Damn. What were we thinking?

 

This leads me to wonder about our user list.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Like many things, progess is hardest on those in business. I am grateful for this forum (and especially the connected wiki), so I will be also contributing as a premium member. Not only for good information, but the ability to share information and experiences we all have. Thanks Andreas!

 

(As a side note: I would love to help contribute images and information to the wiki, how can we do that??)

Link to post
Share on other sites

You mention that when "publishing portraits and street photos to exercise particular sensitivity". I wonder if there is some additional clarity. 

 

[…]

 

Any guidence would be apreciated.

 

 

Difficult…

 

First of all, we are talking about German law under which the Leica Forum is operated.

 

The legal situation until last week was complicated but had a long history of court decisions.

Thus you had a fair chance to understand what is OK:

Do not publish images of people, except…

- You have consent from them

- People of general interest

- People as part of public demonstrations etc.

- Displayed people are not main topic of the image

Big playground for lawyers to discuss, but not too complicated

 

Now we have a new law…

After an uproar by different professional associations (photographers, public relations people) some politicians tried to clarify that the old law is still in place and the new law does not apply.

But the new law is not enforced by politicians but by independent data protection officials.

And it looks as if these have another view on photography...

 

My guess: No big change to come...

 

To make clear what I meant by „to exercise particular sensitivity“:

Don't try to understand a law that nobody understands fully - especially not the last consequences in court.

But try to avoid that anyone starts to complain about your images.

 

I'm definitely not interested in winning legal battles after years

 

Sorry for the lack of guidance ...

 

Andreas

Link to post
Share on other sites

You do a great job, Andreas. I am afraid that the GDPR will add substantially to your load in the short term at least.

 

It really would be a great problem if images of people were to be banned. Getting model-release from a crowd would be difficult. I was looking Wily Ronis' picture of the Strike at the Citroën factory; or for that matter HCB's crowd shots and wondering...if someone in that crowd wanted to be forgotten would the image have to be deleted? The problem isn't trivial and will take a long time to resolve

Link to post
Share on other sites

...if someone in that crowd wanted to be forgotten would the image have to be deleted? The problem isn't trivial and will take a long time to resolve

Or would we end up with very unappealing pictures of crowds of people with pixelated faces ... ?

 

Pete.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You have my deepest sympathy, Andreas, and great respect. I'm working through GDPR for a musical group (a choir). Our problems are small compared to a public forum such as this, and we have good guidance from a national arts co-ordinating body. But it is clear that photography (e.g. of the audience at a concert) is a sensitive area, and, as you have found, it's going to have to wait for case law to become established before we know where we stand.

But I think this is short term pain - once the systems are in place, the long term overhead workload should be minimised.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Difficult…

 

My guess: No big change to come...

 

To make clear what I meant by „to exercise particular sensitivity“:

Don't try to understand a law that nobody understands fully - especially not the last consequences in court.

But try to avoid that anyone starts to complain about your images.

 

I'm definitely not interested in winning legal battles after years

 

Sorry for the lack of guidance ...

 

Andreas

 

Actually this is helpful indeed.

 

Kindest reguards...

Link to post
Share on other sites

It seems as like you say; nothing much will change.  I think the only time someone will complain is if someone objects to their own likeness in a image posted here or almost anywhere else (not likely.)  The only issue I see is if a forum member complains that someone posted pictures of people on this forum without the consent of those pictured...only then I feel is when it could become a problem mainly because someone might work hard to adhere to the new regulations, and then get untangled when someone apparently does not. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I read an article recently in which the author claimed that GDPR would effectively make business cards illegal.

 

I'm sure a lot of the obsfucation around GDPR is being generated by those with the potential to benefit from charging companies and organisations for their advice on the matter.

 

The key things to remember are that this is about organisations keeping and processing personal data about individuals.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...