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Hello user,

by majority request, I open here an infrared photo thread.
Who wants to join the "club" finds instructions, hints and examples
for infrared-photography between pages 274 and 277 of the "normal "image thread"

https://www.l-camera-forum.com/topic/269530-leica-q-the-image-thread/page-274
 

Edited by RK+Q
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Hello guest! Please register or sign in to view the hidden content. Hallo Gast! Du willst die Bilder sehen? Einfach registrieren oder anmelden!

Thank you very much for your praise. Hello guest! Please register or sign in to view the hidden content. Hallo Gast! Du willst die Bilder sehen? Einfach registrieren oder anmelden!     Today it was a bit to windy...   Hello guest! Please register or sign in to view the hidden content. Hallo Gast! Du willst die Bilder sehen? Einfach registrieren oder anmelden!

I can appreciate the aesthetic of infrared photography. If I may, there is also a pragmatic application of it and to that purpose I made the IR photograph below because the background across the river is totally obscured all the time due to haze. That's the Upper Mississippi River facing West from Alma, Wisconsin, part of the Driftless Zone. (I live below the far left bluff.) Hello guest! Please register or sign in to view the hidden content. Hallo Gast! Du willst die Bilder sehen? Einfach r

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nice...which filter  ? or did you get the camera converted ?

Thanks,

it´s a "HOYA INFRARED (R72)"-filter and my cam is not converted.

 

 

Edited by RK+Q
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Thank you very much for your praise.

 

 

Today it was a bit to windy...



 

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I can appreciate the aesthetic of infrared photography. If I may, there is also a pragmatic application of it and to that purpose I made the IR photograph below because the background across the river is totally obscured all the time due to haze. That's the Upper Mississippi River facing West from Alma, Wisconsin, part of the Driftless Zone. (I live below the far left bluff.)

Edited by pico
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Okay. I want to be in the club. I received my Hoya R72 filter a couple days ago. I went out today to the Air Force Academy thinking that the chapel and aircraft would me good high contrast subjects. Suffice into say I've got a lot to learn about using this filter and post processing, but it is fun. A great change for B&W photography exploration.

 

Much thanks to RK+Q, Bags 27 and Zampelis for inspiring me.

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Continuing the flying theme, I got a very rare opportunity today to photograph NASA's Super Guppy transport plane as it did a stop at the Colorado Springs Airport / Peterson AFB. It is a very odd duck looking airplane. I only got an opportunity for one exposure with the R72 filter on before a lot of other vehicles gathered around it for servicing.

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