Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Advertisement (gone after registration)

I would like to know what you think or know about this carl zeiss optics for leica m, since it is a rare piece and I can not find information, I show you the design of lenses, which I found very strange, since it consists of only two elements. .. Thank you

Link to post
Share on other sites

hola el carl zeiss de dos elementos  lo pudimo ver  cuando un tecnico lo abrio para limpiarlo , por lo que yo se las lentes son de una gran puresa de fluorita  sus fotos dan una asmofera muy buena, en unos dia pondre fotos que se vea bien el objetivo. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with 01af, the lens diagram is wrong.  To be a Sonnar design, the two 'lens groups' shown should be compound lenses made of 2 or more individual lens elements and there should be a single, separate lens element to the left of the lefthand 'lens'.  The design will depend on whether it has a f/1.5 or f/2 maximum aperture but I can't read what's written on the lens (despite the thread title).

 

Pete.

Link to post
Share on other sites

hola quiero poner en cuanto me sea posible fotos del objetivo que se vean bien . en cuanto al dibujo del esquema de las lente esta echo pormi no es profecional ,pero lo que estoy totalmente seguro es que se trata de dos lentes cada una echa de una piesa de cristal fundido creo de una gran puresa de fluorita , mi curiosida es que estube enbestigando y no encontre ningun diceño como este . el objetivo es plateado con bayoneta m parese que esta fabricado sobre los año 50. gracia.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Advertisement (gone after registration)

The photo on the left (mount end of the lens) clearly (relatively) shows an LTM to M adapter on the lens, so this is not directly an M mount lens, but was either made for E39 thread mount or converted to E39. I don't know if Zeiss made lenses in Leica mount, but I think I've heard of post-war Jena or Soviet lenses made to fit, since both Soviet FED and Zorki used the Leica mount for some models.

The Leica Thread Mount to M adapter looks so natural on lenses many people don't realize it is an adapter.

Link to post
Share on other sites

During WW II Zeiss had to produce their Sonnar in LTM used by Wehrmacht or Marine as Leitz couldn't supply enough fast lenses. There are of course a lot of fakes not only from soviet sources after the war. You have to look not only at the finish of the lens-Barrel but on Serial number and engravings, too. Original Zeiss Sonnar in ltm are expensive colletor-items. Have a look at some serious actioneers and German Magazine Photo-Deal had articles on this, too.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, I do not want to appear unhelpful, but this is getting a bit irritating to me: Why does TO start all his threads in English and later on gives lengthy replies in Spanish. It would be most helpful if he could stick to English, and it would most propably increase the helpfulness of our replies, as would pictures that show the items in question at least a little in focus (even a smartphone should do that)...

Edited by schattenundlicht
Link to post
Share on other sites

The photo on the left (mount end of the lens) clearly (relatively) shows an LTM to M adapter on the lens, so this is not directly an M mount lens, but was either made for E39 thread mount or converted to E39. I don't know if Zeiss made lenses in Leica mount, but I think I've heard of post-war Jena or Soviet lenses made to fit, since both Soviet FED and Zorki used the Leica mount for some models.

The Leica Thread Mount to M adapter looks so natural on lenses many people don't realize it is an adapter.

 

I picked up a Jupiter 3 with an LTM (M39) mount from 1954 in St Petersburg last week. I would describe it as a Sonnar copy rather than a fake as it does not pretend to be a Zeiss lens. I had seen very over-priced fake Leicas in a 'tourist trap' shop in Moscow a few days earlier. The shop in St Petersburg was a genuine camera shop run by knowledgeable young film enthusiasts. They had a large stock of FSU cameras and lenses and I tried out 3 or 4 Jupiter 3s on my Leica M10 with an adapter before choosing the one I brought home. We had an interesting discussion about different generations of the lens and different factory marks etc. My Jupiter 3 gives a wonderful 'look' when shot wide open or near to that. I also tried a Jupiter 9 85mm f2 in nice condition, but as reported here and elsewhere, it seemed reluctant to give good focus. I also picked up a Jupiter turret multi-finder in very good condition. Both items came in wonderful strong Jupiter polystyrene holders and the one for the turret finder has a nice slot built in to it for the shoe in order to hold it steady.

 

I asked the young guy in the shop if he ever got Leica items. He said that most Leica items were over-priced for the Russian market and he rarely had them in. He had a lot of FSU stock and I was lucky to be able to take some time to pick out nice examples of what I wanted. Russian cameras and lenses can be of variable quality, so I could not pass up the opportunity to examine some first hand and to choose a good one. Original Zeiss Sonnars in LTM mount are not only much more expensive, but are also very hard to find. I would like to get an example some day if one comes up at a reliable auction. I would be much less interested in the modern Zeiss Sonnars.

 

William

Link to post
Share on other sites

Be very careful - there are a number of fake Zeiss Sonnar LTM lenses in circulation. Google for the website which goes through in detail how to spot them. The majority will be re-engraved Jupiter 3 lenses. As these use a Zeiss focusing helicoid pitch, they will not be in correct RF to optical focus throughout their range. The new Lomo Jupiter-3  lens has been corrected for this and does focus properly on Leicas. 

 

Wilson

Link to post
Share on other sites

Be very careful - there are a number of fake Zeiss Sonnar LTM lenses in circulation. Google for the website which goes through in detail how to spot them. The majority will be re-engraved Jupiter 3 lenses. As these use a Zeiss focusing helicoid pitch, they will not be in correct RF to optical focus throughout their range. The new Lomo Jupiter-3  lens has been corrected for this and does focus properly on Leicas. 

 

Wilson

 

You are right about looking for genuine LTM Sonnars. That is why I would only buy from a reputable source. My Jupiter 3 is optically excellent and I had an opportunity to test it before purchase. The shop in St Petersburg did sell Lomo stuff, but as a collector I was after a vintage item. There are some websites out there giving information on FSU lenses and their characteristics eg https://phillipreeve.net/blog/review-jupiter-3-50mm-1-5/ and http://www.sovietcams.com/index.php?1976488110. The large price differential between FSU items and their Zeiss equivalents is such that it encourages faking. 

 

William

Link to post
Share on other sites

>>I picked up a Jupiter 3 with an LTM (M39) mount from 1954 in St Petersburg last week.<<

 

You must have chosen one of the ones I didn't take a few weeks earlier! I presume it was the tiny shop - booth really - in Gostiny Dvor? I had four or five Jupiter-3s to choose from, and there were two or three I would have been very happy with. The young guy in there was very helpful and spoke pretty good English (certainly much better than my Russian)  - I would be very happy to go back there. I haven't as yet had any chance to use my lens for the reason I bought it, portraits, but I have been very pleased with it on the few occasions I have managed to use it on my M10...... 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

It may be worth mentioning that the original Sonnar with Contax mount can be used with an M and (I hope so) with an LTM camera.

 

Amedeo Muscelli makes very diligently produced adapters for Contax lenses to be used with M-mount cameras:

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Zeiss-Contax-rangefinder-lenses-to-Leica-M3-M8-M9-adapter-ring/132573694453?_trkparms=aid%3D111001%26algo%3DREC.SEED%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20131017132637%26meid%3Df3538c25d9fb4500afe1b470461f9c6b%26pid%3D100033%26rk%3D2%26rkt%3D7%26sd%3D362241336027%26itm%3D132573694453&_trksid=p2045573.c100033.m2042

 

The price is not low but you can expect a quality product, which replaces the Contax focussing helicoid - as the lens has none, it is built just like a lenshead.

 

It works faultlessly with 50mm lenses, and you can use it with longer focal lengthes for the Contax, if you are willing to correct some front focus or use liveview.

 

At the moment I do not find an offering for the LTM- adapter by Amedeo, but I know he produced them as well. One can contact him directly if the present bad situation in Venezuela doesn‘t impede communication.

 

Using original Sonnars for the Contax gives you the advantage of a much larger second hand market with lower prices and you can be much surer that you get a „real“ Sonnar. There is not only the risk of many fakes for „Sonnars“ with LTM mount. The original versions with LTM built by Zeiss Jena were all wartime products when quality standards by Zeiss were very variable - to say the least. Most pieces were made of cheap alloy and their condition today is often very bad - notwithstanding high prices on the second hand market.

 

All post-war Sonnars from Carl Zeiss Jena, or from Zeiss-Opton or Carl Zeiss Oberkochen were coated. It is not clear whether there was a difference in the optical design between the East German version from Jena and the West-German version. I think both versions used the last optical design from pre-war or wartimes.

 

It is easy to discern between the versions: pre-war and wartime examples have serial numbers up to approximately 2.800.000 - anything over 2.400.000 being risky. Post war East German versions have numbers higher than 3.000.000 and are engraved Carl Zeiss Jena, „5cm“, West-German versions are engraved „50mm“, of course no „Jena“ with serial numbers from approx. 100.000 up to approx 1.800.000. Examples with numbers higher than 1.000.000 are to be preferred since the West German production had to learn everything from scratch and they needed some time to achieve the Jena standard.

Link to post
Share on other sites

>>I picked up a Jupiter 3 with an LTM (M39) mount from 1954 in St Petersburg last week.<<

 

You must have chosen one of the ones I didn't take a few weeks earlier! I presume it was the tiny shop - booth really - in Gostiny Dvor? I had four or five Jupiter-3s to choose from, and there were two or three I would have been very happy with. The young guy in there was very helpful and spoke pretty good English (certainly much better than my Russian)  - I would be very happy to go back there. I haven't as yet had any chance to use my lens for the reason I bought it, portraits, but I have been very pleased with it on the few occasions I have managed to use it on my M10...... 

 

2018-03-1001838.jpg

 

2018-02-1001027-Edit.jpg

Yes it was in Gostiny Dvor, a little shop called Photo Lubitel (named after the Russian TLR). Max was the helpful young guy that I dealt with. I went through 3 or 4 samples before making my choice. I believe that the shop would be of interest to all Leica or Leica copy film and vintage enthusiasts. Anyone going to St Petersburg should seek out the shop which is very near to the main Nevsky Prospekt shopping area. It is always a pleasure to find such a place while you are on holiday. I had a similar experience in Bergen in Norway some years ago where I came across a shop run by an Italian photographer who was selling vintage Leica film equipment. How I found the shop on this occasion was that a young guy on our tour group asked me if I knew where he could get film for his Lomo camera and I did a quick online search. There's still some hope for the 'iPhone generation'. I showed him the Jupiter turret finder and he declared it to be 'cool'.

 

William

Link to post
Share on other sites

About the adapters made by Amadeo. They are excellent build quality. I have 2 of the contax-ltm parts. He tried to convince me to go with the M adapter which he said were better, don't recall how.

 

There's a compiled list of lenses that work properly with the adapters, maybe RF.

 

The one problem I had with the adapters was with collapsible contax lenses it was pretty difficult to get them into fixed and extended position without unscrewing the adapter. Like the collapsible 5cm for example and the Tessars too. Consequently I haven't used them too much. Have a pretty nice Iia as well as a Nikon s2 (aware of nikon/contax differences but its pretty hard to see them) for those lenses. Although for me the Nikon contax cameras are more difficult to operate.

Edited by mickjazz
Link to post
Share on other sites

I had read a post on RFF from Amadeo that he has moved to the United States. Here is the posting he made recently

 

Greetings dear members, I has moved to Miami, FL in the United States in 2016 where have a CNC shop for to cut panels for kitchen and closet makers, I virtually have lost all my properties in my country, can't sell them, everybody is selling and running out, so I am starting over here.

I still keep my shop working in Venezuela, for two years I have trained a very capable CNC machinist for to make the adapters for me, hope to keep the production there a couple of years before to move the production here.

Regards,

Amedeo Muscelli

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have one of Amedeo's very early Contax to Leica M adapters. I too really wanted a Contax to LTM but he admitted there might be a problem with them and persuaded me to buy an M one. As others have said, they are beautifully made but...... the coding pits on mine are incorrectly aligned, nearly one whole pit out. I suspect he may have worked from that incorrect PDF file which was around on the LUF, soon after the M8 came out. I hope he has now corrected this error. I sent him a correct drawing for the coding pits. 

 

Wilson

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Al Brown
      About 100 yers ago, Leitz company issued a set of theatre binoculars in gold (BINAR and BITUR, according to Laney). It was a thing of class and the luxury edition adorned  their catalogue until the WWII. The logical choice was to try and implement the gold mystique to the Leitz cameras as well - and thus in 1929 the "Luxus" Leica (LELUX, LESSALUX) was born. Although never a huge commercial success, the cameras (less than 100 made according to Rogliatti et al.) remains a collector favorite.

      Fast forward to the M era. There were several attempts to revive the glitter with custom golden M3's, but the biggest golden boom was created after the M "revival" with the special edition M4-2 in 1979, commemorating the 100 years anniversary of Oskar Barnack (1879-1979). There were 500+500 cameras made in 1979 and 1980 in Canada for the occasion (1527201-1527700 and 1528151-1528650 respectively) with 24-karat gold plating.

      After that, there were several more editions in gold - for the Sultan of Brunei (I know of two variants, first was the 25th Anniversary of accession to the throne of Sultan of Brunei on 1st October 1992), for the commemoration of the Golden Jubilee celebration of the access to the throne of HM The King Bhumiphol Adulyadej of Thailand (1996) and the Leica MP Gold "60 years PRC" (2009).

      Several very nice golden M2, M3 and M4s surface on eBay now and then, but they are all custom repaints.
      No golden M was made in digital era, only brass - M10P for Thailand S.C. ASSET comes to mind.

      Please feel free to add any additional information!
      And do write how you feel about golden Leicas. You know what they say - anything useful to you is pure gold, regardless of the material used...

      (Pictured here: my personal M4-2 with Leica catalogue production number 10420 from 1980 with the Summilux dating from 1977.)

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in to view the hidden content. Hallo Gast! Du willst die Bilder sehen? Einfach registrieren oder anmelden!
    • By Linus458
      I found this Carl Zeiss Jena lens for Leica SM (M39) at a flea market. This is what I could find about it:
      The Herar should be cheaper opportunity to the Carl Zeiss Biogon. It was originally produced for the Contax mount. The lens was produced around 500-1000 times. The one i found appears to be a prototype/sample for the Leica screw mount M39. It has a connection for the range finder and the aperture can be controlled with the front ring of the lens. It was produced before 1939. 
      I hope I got everything right.
      My two questions:
      Are the infos are all right (age, Version etc.)
      and since inform own a Leica with drew Mount I want to sell it. What is the right price? (I only found two offers online both around 3000usd, is it really worth that much?) 
      I also read that one was sold at a Auction at Christies in 1992. 
      I’m very thankful for any held or answer ✌🏻

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in to view the hidden content. Hallo Gast! Du willst die Bilder sehen? Einfach registrieren oder anmelden!
      Hello guest! Please register or sign in to view the hidden content. Hallo Gast! Du willst die Bilder sehen? Einfach registrieren oder anmelden!
      Hello guest! Please register or sign in to view the hidden content. Hallo Gast! Du willst die Bilder sehen? Einfach registrieren oder anmelden!
    • By Al Brown
      Do you use a half case? Show us the images of your beauties! What are in your opinion the benefits? What is the best half case out there? Curious and eager to see!
    • By Al Brown
      On September 14th in 2006, Leica introduced the first digital M camera, the Leica M8 featuring a 10.3 megapixel CCD image sensor.
      After 15 years, a new is M11 coming for all eager M photographers in love with latest technology available from Wetzlar.
      I would like to know which digital model from these fruitful 15 years has been your favorite and/or which digital M model (each had its quirks) you hated the most.
    • By Al Brown
      A polarizing question, but a fair one.

      If one wanted to replace the screw above the lens (on, say, M-P or M10R black paint) with the red (or black) dot logo sticker, is the hole as big as the original logo sticker? Is the screw flat so one could just put the sticker over it? I found no topic of this sort but if it has been answered please do link to the thread.
      Thank you for your civilized answers, please no dumb discussions of "why would anyone want to do that?" kind, it is an academic question.
       
×
×
  • Create New...