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Ripple sky


WilliamG
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I figured it out about the color banding issue. It was caused by photo editor in Windows 10. This issues can also be duplicated in iPad photo app. There is no banding issue at all by using Lightroom or Photoshop. Thank you all.

Great to hear. Time for a better editor.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have had this same problem (since buying my Q last May, 2017).  The rippling effect of blue skies is identical to that of the original poster. However, the effect only appears permanently on the LCD image of the camera; I use Lightroom and, on downloading the shot to my Mac, it appears only for a fraction of a second on the laptop screen before automatically correcting itself. This happens with DNG files, but I am wondering if it occurs because the image you see on the LCD - and perhaps initially on the screen, for a fraction of a second - may be a compressed/thumbnail/low res JPEG or whatever.  

 

Because it doesn't affect the actual working file, & doesn't need removing in Lightroom PP, I've tried to ignore it as one of those anomalies digital sometimes throws up. But, it can be annoying to see on the LCD. In some ways it's comforting that someone else is experiencing the same - i.e. it's probably just a quirk of the Q and nothing major.  However, if anybody disagrees with that, I'd be glad to hear more views.

 

Thanks,

Chris.   

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It's not the camera and it's not the result of jpeg compression. Every photo you see posted on this forum is a compressed jpeg. The problem is with your image editing software, or perhaps with the way you are processing. Picture Editor is not really up to the task. You need a good quality software.

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Hi, and thanks - but, as I said, the effect for me is seen only on the LCD of the camera (i.e. when I playback the image on the back of the camera).  On importing the image to Lightroom, it disappears; it's as though Lightroom automatically processes it out  before I even touch it for PP.  That's what makes me think it's a camera glitch - & my accepting that the original poster's image illustrated the effect because it had remained in post processing due to his editing software. Lightroom does remove it ok, but it's there alright, and it shows up vividly on the camera's LCD.

 

As I say, if this is normal for the Q I'll accept it.  If others don't experience it, I may drop it back to Manchester Leica for their advice.  

 

Thanks again.

 

Regards,

Chris. 

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What you are seeing is the compressed embedded JPG. When imported LR will briefly display it before substituting its own  conversion.

So the problem is with the JPG engine of the camera. I do not know whether this is normal at some settings or an individual fault. Consult Leica.

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What Jaapv said is correct. You'll see this on the LCD and if you use the EVF to review images. It's the embedded JPG that is displayed in both cases, even if you shoot DNG only. There simply isn't enough bit depth in the JPG to show the gradations in things like the sky. You'll also see this and other weird behavior if you import on an iPad and look at the DNGs in the Photos app. Adding those imported DNGs to LR Mobile will clear it all up. 

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  • 3 years later...
On 2/20/2018 at 7:06 PM, eujin said:

What Jaapv said is correct. You'll see this on the LCD and if you use the EVF to review images. It's the embedded JPG that is displayed in both cases, even if you shoot DNG only. There simply isn't enough bit depth in the JPG to show the gradations in things like the sky. You'll also see this and other weird behavior if you import on an iPad and look at the DNGs in the Photos app. Adding those imported DNGs to LR Mobile will clear it all up. 

Just ran into (or noticed actually) this "issue".  The above isn't quite accurate (I don't think...)  I always shoot DNG and JPG.  When viewing the files via the computer operating system, it's the DNG files only that show the behavior.  Viewing the out of camera JPGs are fine for the same image.  To illustrate, see the images below.  These are scree snips taken from the display on my Windows 10 machine.  The ones that show the sky banding are viewer rendering of the DNGs, and the ones that show no banding are the viewer rendering of the out of camera JPGs.  The issue is limited to how computer operating systems handle DNGs for display in their built-in image viewers.  The problem DOES NOT appear when viewing images via the camera screen.

In any case, it's a non-issue assuming that you do anything with the DNGs other than view them on your computer monitor prior to any post-processing.

 

Edited by aristotle
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Good morning, I have owned the Leica Q2 for three days and yesterday I had the same problem, I was photographing a landscape in the blue hour and when observing the result on the lcd screen I saw the effect of the gradient sky.  When I got home I imported to ligthroom and the problem disappeared, the sky was correct.  My current firmware is 3.0, I don't know if 3.1 will fix the problem.

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I have never seen such banding in the sky. Certainly not in USA. :D

Since issue is resolved, I have to remind myself again never to work with jpeg files for processing. DNG and tiff have enough bits to render the sky gradation correctly. Jpeg doesn't have enough bits.

Once I had only the jpeg with such banding in sky. It was still possible to fix it by PP. Just google up "how to fix banding in photoshop".

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Hace 2 horas, jmahto dijo:

Nunca había visto tales bandas en el cielo. Ciertamente no en Estados Unidos. :D

Dado que el problema está resuelto, tengo que recordarme a mí mismo de nuevo que nunca debo trabajar con archivos jpeg para su procesamiento. DNG y tiff tienen suficientes bits para representar correctamente la gradación del cielo. Jpeg no tiene suficientes bits.

Una vez tuve solo el jpeg con tales bandas en el cielo. Todavía era posible arreglarlo con PP. Solo busca en Google "cómo arreglar las bandas en Photoshop".


 
Edited by Mariano727
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If your viewing DNG files (or any RAW files from other makes) in Adobe Lightroom and you have the preferences set to 'smart previews' and not 'originals' this will often happen with finely gradated areas as you are not viewing the full resolution file. If you zoom in to 100%  and zoom out again you will see the full resolution image and the banding will disappear

Edited by viramati
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The banding in camera is likely the result of compromises for speed. The picture you see on the rear screen is a jpeg rendered on the fly to show you what the image you just shot looks like. The smaller and more efficient this jpeg is, the less of an impact on the cameras other operations (buffer etc). Given that it is likely not critical to the image presentation if there is a bit of banding, Leica and probably all companies prioritize speed over quality of the embedded jpeg. When it comes down to editors, it is usually an interplay of your software, screen size and camera file size, so it is very hard to predict. Lightroom (and I assume some other editors as well) do not edit the full pixels of your photo. Like the camera, they edit a jpeg and then when you export, they render the full pixels. If you want to be sure there is no banding, the main way is to open in a pixel level editor like Photoshop and view at 100%. Barring 100%, 50 and 25 usually give banding free results. If you still have it, it might even just be your monitor, not the file. Most people are still using 8 bit monitors, and sometimes they display banding. 10 bit monitors like from Eizo and Nec etc can help eliminate the issue.

Edited by Stuart Richardson
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On 2/2/2018 at 10:51 AM, WilliamG said:

I copied the photo from SD card to laptop. And the banding can be seen when opening  it with a picture editor in Windows.

It is quite possible the editor you are using does not handle DNG files...well, or even at all. I have a suspicion it is using the very small JPG preview file from the DNG, not the raw date itself. 

If you can post the DNG somewhere as suggested, someone should be able to easily review. 

EDIT: I see there was progress on this in additional responses. GuessI should read the full thread before jumping in :D

Edited by _Michael
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It looks simply like the app displaying the photo doesn't support enough colors, ie the bit depth isn't high enough. With 24-bit color, you get 16.7 million colors, with 16-bit, you only get 65,536. This banding is typical of low color bit depth. 

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