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Sunrise at Zabriskie Point, taken in Death Valley during one of the Workshops I led there last January. Leica S (007), Leica Vario-Elmar-S 30-90mm and Formatt-Hitech Firecrest filters.

 

 

Thanks for viewing, best regards

 

Vieri

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Wow! Very spectacular!

 

Thank you very much indeed!

 

Beautiful!

 

Thank you very much Stuart!

 

Another fabulous one Vieri

 

Thank you very much Bill, much appreciated!

 

Another stunner.

 

Thank you very much indeed!

 

the sky is amazingly beautiful although the foreground looks a bit like a cartoon.

 

 

Sorry you didn't like the foreground, even though "a cartoon" sounds a bit harsh to me.

 

Best regards,

 

Vieri

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With all respect, wouldn't shooting a unique point of view of the same scene be more rewarding?

 

Oh, most certainly and I intend to do that.  Unfortunately, I'll only be there a couple of nights so that really limits my "golden time" attempts.  For this trip, I want to photograph the sand dunes, Zabriskie Point and sunset from Dante's View.  During my previous visits to the park, the only really good sunset I've been able to capture was during a sandstorm. I did that with a Nikon D-3 so I cannot post that here.

 

Mike

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I didn't mean you shouldn't attempt as beautiful a scene, but "replicate" just sounded like you wanted to recreate the exact same photograph, that's all. Even from the same vantage point and conditions, there would be plenty of different compositions to be had

I may have taken your meaning wrong.

 

Oh, most certainly and I intend to do that.  Unfortunately, I'll only be there a couple of nights so that really limits my "golden time" attempts.  For this trip, I want to photograph the sand dunes, Zabriskie Point and sunset from Dante's View.  During my previous visits to the park, the only really good sunset I've been able to capture was during a sandstorm. I did that with a Nikon D-3 so I cannot post that here.

 

Mike

Edited by nickjbedford
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I didn't mean you shouldn't attempt as beautiful a scene, but "replicate" just sounded like you wanted to recreate the exact same photograph, that's all. Even from the same vantage point and conditions, there would be plenty of different compositions to be had

I may have taken your meaning wrong.

No worries, Nick.  You're right, the use of "replicate" was the wrong word to use.  Almost every time I've been there (this will be my 10th visit), there have been cloudless skies and, with vistas like you see out there, the "drama" is lessened.  I certainly don't want another sandstorm, though!  My M-P's sensor would never clean, again.

 

Mike

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A sandstorm with any camera makes me nervous! Haha.

 

No worries, Nick.  You're right, the use of "replicate" was the wrong word to use.  Almost every time I've been there (this will be my 10th visit), there have been cloudless skies and, with vistas like you see out there, the "drama" is lessened.  I certainly don't want another sandstorm, though!  My M-P's sensor would never clean, again.

 

Mike

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Mike and Nick,

 

this is a very interesting debate. During the last interview I did, I have been asked once again if I believe that there are still any un-photographed-before places to photograph; the implied answer was "no", of course. To me, the point is not in necessarily find new places to photograph; I see my work as that of an interpreter, where a particular landscape is the score and my photograph is the performance / interpretation. As all interpreters - classical musicians are a good case in point - we need to study previous interpretations, created by other performers (photographers, in our case), to develop our taste in "playing" (or photographing, in our case). In particular, back to photography, we develop our taste by looking at other photographs, paintings, movies, anything visual - whether related to landscape or not.

 

The border between "getting inspired by" images we see and "try and replicating" them is, of course, very thin; it is easy to see so many images of a place that when we get there we subconsciously try to repeat the framing / compositions we saw. 

 

My suggestion is always that of not trying to impose our expectations (perhaps created by all the images we saw) on the landscape and weather, because that will almost inevitably turn into a failure, or into a copycat image at best (in case weather conditions are exactly the same, which is practically impossible). Rather, we have to let ourselves be inspired by the conditions we find on a particular day and place: do the best we can with what we have got. That will perhaps not turn into an epic image, if the conditions aren't epic, but it will certainly turn into an original work of a much seen scene, which is the best we can aspire to create.

 

Best regards,

 

Vieri

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