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leica dream

My film journey starts here!

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My thread "Return to film - or not" at the beginning of this year drew valuable information from many experienced followers. I experimented with some very old (50+)  cameras getting some very poor results so abandoned progress but I did not stop thinking, researching and considering all your input - for which very grateful thanks. After a couple of months I decided to have a go, looked at options and set some targets..........then waited for the right opportunity. I spotted a good starter with the help of Ffordes and have managed to change my Leica V-LUX1 this week for a good secondhand Leica R6.2 and 50mm lens. That leaves me with my invaluable little Leica C for colour spontaneous shots and a good quality film camera to develop my skills. Lab process at first (Peak Imaging)  then I can scan negatives but hopefully move to home process fairly soon. Years ago I had full darkroom/enlarger etc, but nowadays with changing bags and scanners things have moved on I guess.

Now, apart from trivial logistics like finding a suitable case/bag for the camera I realize that I have been out of film for about 15 years so am rusty about what is still out there...........which is where I need advice please. Internet advice is most confusing.

I want to start with B&W and a good general all seasons outdoor film (mostly handheld work) while finding my way around the camera so think that ISO400 should work well with all the camera settings available to me. When I experimented earlier this year I used a slow Acros 100. Many know that I am not a fan of B&W but I just feel it is a good starting base which I understand, and who knows, I might get hooked!

Am I right to go with ISO400 or should I stick at ISO200, and which brand for a starter Kodak, Ilford, Fuji.........or what? (I hope that does not open a can of worms with many opposing ideas!)

 

Very enthusiastic to get started so, now I have committed,  grateful for any input about anything.

Richard

Edited by leica dream

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I think that the type of film for you to use will depend on your subject preferences. There is a large range of films to choose from, for ISO 400 there are stocks such as Tri-X, TMax-400, HP5+, Delta 400, Bergger Pancro 400... even in these few you will find a wide range of different results possible, probably best to figure out what you like by trying them out.

 

My two personal favourite stocks are quite different (Tri-X and Acros 100) and are used with different goals in mind. Also, I have had good results from the other stocks mentioned, so your favourites may be different.

 

Good luck and enjoy the film journey!

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From my perspective, although ISO 400 films seem to be the most readily available, unless one is shooting in dim light or with a ND filter, most of your outdoor shots will be taken with the diaphragm significantly closed

down, defeating the purpose of using large aperture lenses. I'd take a look at someone like Freestyle's online catalog to identify lower ISO films, see what appeals to you on a speed basis, and research the hell out of the film for its positive & negative characteristics - especially if you are either not developing it yourself or if you plan to use a particular developer. In B&W I'm curently using up a bulk roll of Tri-x which I expose at ISO 280. I still have a cuple of rolls of EFKE 25 sitting in the freezer, since it is no longer produced, for special projects. I also like Pan-F/Pan-F+ on occasion. (I dearly miss Plus-X, my favorite for many years).

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Back in the 1960s my favorite B&W for quality was PanatomicX, with TriX for available light. These days I use Ilford films, with Pan-F+ as my favorite for its grain and tonality. I use HP5+ a lot for available light now, but Delta 400 may take over.

For color I now like Ektar a lot, or Portra 400 for people.

I now use Rodinal for a B&W developer, which keeps well for occasional use.

I look forward to the new Kodak Ektachrome, but still miss Kodachrome 25.

Edited by TomB_tx

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From my perspective, although ISO 400 films seem to be the most readily available, unless one is shooting in dim light or with a ND filter, most of your outdoor shots will be taken with the diaphragm significantly closed

down, defeating the purpose of using large aperture lenses. I'd take a look at someone like Freestyle's online catalog to identify lower ISO films, see what appeals to you on a speed basis, and research the hell out of the film for its positive & negative characteristics - especially if you are either not developing it yourself or if you plan to use a particular developer. In B&W I'm curently using up a bulk roll of Tri-x which I expose at ISO 280. I still have a cuple of rolls of EFKE 25 sitting in the freezer, since it is no longer produced, for special projects. I also like Pan-F/Pan-F+ on occasion. (I dearly miss Plus-X, my favorite for many years).

What you say makes a lot of sense to be about defeating the advantages of the large aperture lens - I am obviously still in old camera mode so maybe I need to rethink.

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Well, just to enable me to run something through my camera and get processed prior to the Christmas mail rush I just went for the slower FP4 this time around.

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Post your images in the photo forum then put a link to the post in this thread. I'm interested to see your results. I've seen some very nice FP4 images developed in Rodinal. Of course you won't have any control over their development if you're giving them to a lab.

 

Scanning - Some films are easier than others to scan - Tmax for example.

 

You mention you're not a fan of B+W. Take a look at Paulmac's images (Northern England and Mosques) in the Photo Forum, some of which are in the "I love Film Thread". They're pushed TriX I think, and look superb. 

Also, just google Ilford Delta 100 images and see what comes up. It may stoke your interest in B+W.

I'm going to have a B+W year next year, apart from colour Polaroids and FP100c. Film is so much more exciting than digital.

Pete

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I am trying to build some sort of workflow now I have a processed 35mm film, starting with my EpsonV700 scanner.

Unlikely that for the time being I shall want to print anything above 7X5 ins but I am confused about best scan resolution to produce best image for my general need and to get me started.

Any advice welcome.

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I use 400 iso film with a yellow filter, this takes it down to an 200 iso equivalent allowing larger apertures. As evening comes on I remove the filter to regain the 400 speed, this works well for me.

 

As for the scanning resolution, I'll let other people answer that as I'm still trying to work it out myself.

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I also use an Epson V700 Photo for B&W negatives, and find 2400 or 3200 a good compromise for detail, file size, and speed.

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All of the film photos that I upload to the forum (mainly the 'I Love Film' thread are scanned on my V700 using the EpsonScan software at its default settings, apart from Unsharp Mask, which I set to low.  The resulting files are then imported into LR CC where I tweak contrast etc  (I overexpose by a stop and under-develop by 15% to give a 'flat' negative, which makes for an easier neg to scan).  Works for me, anyway! 

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I'

 

I also use an Epson V700 Photo for B&W negatives, and find 2400 or 3200 a good compromise for detail, file size, and speed.

I've had siginificanty improved results on my Epsom v700 since using my newly acquired Scan Tech Anti Newton Ring ANR Optical Glass.  It is specifically cut for the Epson scanner film carriers in different formats and isn't that expensive.  He is on eBay and and communication & service is excellent.  BTW I have no financial interest in this product.

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I'

 

I've had siginificanty improved results on my Epsom v700 since using my newly acquired Scan Tech Anti Newton Ring ANR Optical Glass.  It is specifically cut for the Epson scanner film carriers in different formats and isn't that expensive.  He is on eBay and and communication & service is excellent.  BTW I have no financial interest in this product.

 

Thank you for mentioning this, I've been meaning to order this for a while, you just prompted me to do it.

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Thank you for the input. At last I have mastered a basic print - OK I know I am rubbish at composition but this is a start. Much refinement needed at both ends of the camera.

Good start.

 

My end goal for my photos is darkroom prints but I also scan my negatives for the web using an Epson scanner and do a bit of PP in Lightroom. I shoot all of my photos on Tri-X 400.

 

If you have any interest in seeing the results I have a sampling of photos posted on my photo site at

 

http://projektnine11.com

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Good start.

My end goal for my photos is darkroom prints but I also scan my negatives for the web using an Epson scanner and do a bit of PP in Lightroom. I shoot all of my photos on Tri-X 400.

If you have any interest in seeing the results I have a sampling of photos posted on my photo site athttp://projektnine11.com

Nice set of urban landscapes

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Thank you for the input. At last I have mastered a basic print - OK I know I am rubbish at composition but this is a start. Much refinement needed at both ends of the camera.

 

All this is learnable. For composition, look at pictures, in particular paintings. Claude Lorain, Turner for example. They are the best teachers.
 
Improving printing is also a learning experience – take it from me who is still on the road. Look at high quality prints from a master. Always take the opportunity to look at the real deal – books are fine, but there is nothing like looking at the real thing. A genuine Ansel Adams or Edward Weston print is an amazing experience.
Edited by Michael Hiles

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MarkP

This looks a good addition especially for keeping the negatives flat. I have to say that some of my shots did not print as crisply as I would have expected from my Sumicron lens so looking at the negatives in my mount what you say makes lots of sense. I used an ANR type glass years ago for my transparencies to stop them popping out of focus. That stuff was called Preglaglass and fitted 35mm mounts perfectly but was expensive.

I can only see the item you mention via Ebay from America - is that my closest source?

Richard

Edited by leica dream

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MarkP

This looks a good addition especially for keeping the negatives flat. I have to say that some of my shots did not print as crisply as I would have expected from my Sumicron lens so looking at the negatives in my mount what you say makes lots of sense. I used an ANR type glass years ago for my transparencies to stop them popping out of focus. That stuff was called Preglaglass and fitted 35mm mounts perfectly but was expensive.

I can only see the item you mention via Ebay from America - is that my closest source?

Richard

 

 

 

I'm unaware of them being available elsewhere. I'm in Australia. Shipping was prompt.

 

Mark

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