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Tri-X vertical curl


sm23221
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I don't think drying film on reels is ever recommended. I don't see how it would fix your complaint of curling.

 

An important advantage of the two clip vertical method is that after using a wetting agent, water will flow to the bottom of the film due to gravity. A not insignificant advantage.

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I always dry 35mm on stainless steel reels in a Senrac forced air dryer. No problems whatsoever.

 

Edited by pico
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I don't think drying film on reels is ever recommended. I don't see how it would fix your complaint of curling.

 

An important advantage of the two clip vertical method is that after using a wetting agent, water will flow to the bottom of the film due to gravity. A not insignificant advantage.

Logically the reel will hold the film in place and prevent it from curling along the "vertical" axis.  The water can drip off along the "horizontal" axis when the reel is laid flat.  Has anyone tried this? The Senrac dryer above seems to work in this manner, so why bother taking the film out of the reel in the first place? Thanks.

Edited by sm23221
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Would it make any sense to dry my film on the developing reel to avoid the dreaded extreme vertical curl that I can't seem to get rid of?  Why dry by hanging vertically with clips on both ends? Thanks in advance!!

 

Film emulsion swells when it is wet, and one of the big causes of drying marks comes when blobs of water are present on the surface and dry at a much slower rate than the rest of the emulsion. Drying film on the reel would cause the same problem, localised especially along the edges where water would pool.

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I used to dry my film at an angle if I could 

 

That way the water falls to the sprockets first, rather than all the way down three feet of film to the bottom.

 

It's been a long time since I've done it though - I sold my house with the utility room in which I used to do my processing. And the M240 came along...

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Film emulsion swells when it is wet, and one of the big causes of drying marks comes when blobs of water are present on the surface and dry at a much slower rate than the rest of the emulsion. Drying film on the reel would cause the same problem, localised especially along the edges where water would pool.

 

So don't print the edges. Seriously, never had that problem with the Senrac.

Edited by pico
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I've always rewound my film on the reel emulsion side out, dunked it in phofo-flo then dried it in the Senrac or my own homemade version. The film comes off the reel perfectly flat.

So it seems like the best way to address this issue is to leave it on the reel and quick dry like the Senrac with maybe a hairdryer on a lower heat setting?

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I think you are in for a dust storm.

 

Right. Air filtration is important.

 

The Senrac has a large filter surrounding the air inlet. See photo. The retaining wire mesh is 'W' shaped for more area and the filter is doubled over. I use the fine type used in room humidifiers - it is the right size, too.

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I have experienced vertical curls mostly with Kodak films so far - especially older expired ones tend to curl more for some reason. Kodak also uses a thicker acrylic film than other manufacturers do. Vertical curl is bad for scanning purposes after drying. Since I dry my films just after rinse with distilled water by hanging, vertical curls are nearly impossible to get rid of. This is one reason why I prefer Ilford films - they are much easier to handle since they are thinner, don't curl as much and dry faster in air. Only con is sometimes if the film gets stuck in the Paterson reel that one or two sprockets get damaged/worn out. Never happens with thicker film. 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Tri-X dried normally, vertically hung. Yes, it has curls and bends at this point. Then when the tackiness has just gone, in my bathroom after an hour or so, I wind it back on to a dry reel the wrong way round and let it fully cure in a dust-free drawer. Absolutely flat from then on.

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Whether the Tri-X curl is an issue or not depends on how you hold the negative for scanning or darkroom printing. I scan my 35mm negatives with a BEOON setup and I find that the Tri-X curl actually helps. The channel for the film under the base of the BEOON was designed before the introduction of modern films on a thinner base. When I scan HP5+ or HP4+ negatives the fit of the film in the channel is so loose that my hand tremors make it tricky to accurately position a frame of the thin flat film in the window of the mask. In contrast, Tri-X is a snug fit in the channel and the curl adds enough friction that I have no trouble positioning the film, but the mask still holds the film perfectly flat. Any negative holder that pressed down the entire perimeter of the frame should work as well.

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