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Making contact sheets using Epson scanner and Printer


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#1 Avatar

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 06:43

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SInce all this discussion about scanning and the Beoon, I thought I'd share how I use my Epson 850 for previews and contact sheets.

 

After I develop film and dry, I lay down the negatives directly on the scanner, then scan and create a tif.

 

I open it in Photoshop and adjust globally to get them to look good to my eye.

 

Then I print the contact sheet on glossy paper. I use 11 x 14 and 'scale to fit' media. That of course enlarges the negatives (positives at this point) on the contact sheet. I had this paper for years and since I never use glossy paper, I kill two birds with one stone.

 

Further than that, I either mark up the contact sheet to decide what to scan and/or I view them in PS or LR and can cut them out and adjust as needed.

 

The image quality of these bulk pictures is really very good and clearly good enough to decide what you want to scan. Plus I hole punch and include as a cover of the 36 negatives.

 

I have included a sample from the contact sheet I made tonight.

 

 

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#2 Steve Ricoh

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 09:13

Your filing system is going to be SO easy to manage, definitely worth the effort.
I like to see the film gate, numbers and film type. Are these visible when scanning with the Epson 850 film holders, ie as supplied?

#3 250swb

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 13:34

In making thumbnails for a contact sheet you put the negs directly onto the static rich glass platen, which then only allows the use of the lowest quality scanning lens (making judging thumbnail focus far more difficult), and when the large image is inverted you have lots and lots of black, which with anything other than a potato printer is going to cost a fortune in ink. I don't know whether to leave that as a statement or a question?


Edited by 250swb, 14 September 2017 - 13:38.

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#4 Doug A

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 13:44

Your filing system is going to be SO easy to manage, definitely worth the effort.

 

I've been doing this - scanned contact sheets - since I started shooting film again in 2010. My filling system is a set of loose leaf binders with the contact sheets in chronological order, and a second set of binders with the corresponding negatives in PrintFile negative pages. When I make an inkjet print I re-scan the negative and send a copy of the RAW file to my son who lives in another state. If the worst should happen and I lose all of my negatives, contact sheets, RAW scans and prints I can still re-create all of my "keepers."


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#5 Doug A

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 13:51

In making thumbnails for a contact sheet you put the negs directly onto the static rich glass platen, which then only allows the use of the lowest quality scanning lens (making judging thumbnail focus far more difficult), and when the large image is inverted you have lots and lots of black, which with anything other than a potato printer is going to cost a fortune in ink. I don't know whether to leave that as a statement or a question?

 

I don't worry about focus with the contact sheet. Only if it looks like a interesting photo in the tiny size. And I shoot, on average, about one roll a week. The cost of one 8-1/2 x 11 print a week is not prohibitive.


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#6 Steve Ricoh

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 14:20

In making thumbnails for a contact sheet you put the negs directly onto the static rich glass platen, which then only allows the use of the lowest quality scanning lens (making judging thumbnail focus far more difficult), and when the large image is inverted you have lots and lots of black, which with anything other than a potato printer is going to cost a fortune in ink. I don't know whether to leave that as a statement or a question?


Static rich glass platen, does it charge in use or is it the nature of the glass compound. Way round this - wipe with anti-static cloth I guess.
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Posted 14 September 2017 - 16:29

Static rich glass platen, does it charge in use or is it the nature of the glass compound. Way round this - wipe with anti-static cloth I guess.

I do that before I use the scanner each time.


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Posted 14 September 2017 - 17:45

Static rich glass platen, does it charge in use or is it the nature of the glass compound. Way round this - wipe with anti-static cloth I guess.

 

This type of cloth is on my must have list. Nothing cleans glass like it. I use it to polish mirrors, monitor screens, etc. No chemicals, just sprinkle a few drops of water and wipe down.

 

https://www.amazon.c...e?ie=UTF8&psc=1


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Posted 14 September 2017 - 21:30

In making thumbnails for a contact sheet you put the negs directly onto the static rich glass platen, which then only allows the use of the lowest quality scanning lens (making judging thumbnail focus far more difficult), and when the large image is inverted you have lots and lots of black, which with anything other than a potato printer is going to cost a fortune in ink. I don't know whether to leave that as a statement or a question?

 

I don't have any issue with dust as they go straight from drying, cut and then placed in the scanner bed after wiping with the cloth I use. As far as the focusing, it's not an issue as they look good enough to decide which are candidates for hi res scanning. 

 

Im not sure what you mean about the scanner using the lowest quality scanning lens? There are two lenses in the Epson 850 and as far as I know, one is used when scanning reflective material and the other is for negatives or transparencies.

 

As far as ink used to create the printed contact sheet, it's a cost saver compared to the cost charged by labs, not to mention the convenience.

 

and Steve Rocoh, you do not see the sides of the film when they are in the holders.


Edited by Avatar, 14 September 2017 - 21:30.

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#10 pico

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 22:35

My practice is to never use contact prints - ever. A negative will show promise on its own.  Of course if your work is serial documentary work, my peculiar approach is not pertinent. How many of us are serial documentary photographers?

 

I have a couple of these for 35mm. Not necessary with larger formats. The device allows magnified view of each 35mm negative and an edge punch to mark those for attention, usually in the darkroom.

 

The other frames go into the bin.

.


Edited by pico, 14 September 2017 - 22:38.


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#11 250swb

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 15:52

 There are two lenses in the Epson 850 and as far as I know, one is used when scanning reflective material and the other is for negatives or transparencies.

 

 

 

The higher quality lens is used when you are using the film holders, the lower quality lens for anything on the platen. Both are fixed focus, which is why you get adjustable film holders for the critical work, so because the high quality lens can't change its focus it can't focus on the glass surface. Newton's rings are also a problem you can encounter in putting film onto the glass because it makes a reflection, but this is usually only noticeable with larger format negatives.  


Edited by 250swb, 15 September 2017 - 15:58.

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 17:57

The higher quality lens is used when you are using the film holders, the lower quality lens for anything on the platen. Both are fixed focus, which is why you get adjustable film holders for the critical work, so because the high quality lens can't change its focus it can't focus on the glass surface. Newton's rings are also a problem you can encounter in putting film onto the glass because it makes a reflection, but this is usually only noticeable with larger format negatives.  

 

You had mentioned in other posts about the two lenses and one being of lower quality. 

 

I have not done comparisons between a high res scan in the holder compared to directly on the glass but I will as I am curious.

 

The only difference I imagine is with the holders you can adjust distance from the glass.  With my scanner, focus seems best achieved when the holder is in the lowest position.

 

The only mention I've heard of two lenses in the scanner are regarding whether scanning reflective material directly on the scanner flatbed or if using holders a different lense is used.

 

If you can link me to anything about this, I'd appreciate it.


Edited by Avatar, 15 September 2017 - 17:57.


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Posted 15 September 2017 - 19:22

All that I have found about the two lenses on the scanner is that one is 4800dpi and the other 6400dpi. 


Edited by Avatar, 15 September 2017 - 19:48.


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Posted 16 September 2017 - 07:28

The higher quality lens is used when you are using the film holders, the lower quality lens for anything on the platen. Both are fixed focus, which is why you get adjustable film holders for the critical work, so because the high quality lens can't change its focus it can't focus on the glass surface. Newton's rings are also a problem you can encounter in putting film onto the glass because it makes a reflection, but this is usually only noticeable with larger format negatives.  

 

I did a bit of research today and while I found no definitive answer, this is what I believe to be the case, let me know if this is incorrect.

 

When  selecting "Reflective' in Epson Scan, that chooses the lense which has a maximum resolution of 4800dpi, if either film options are chosen, I believe the maximum resolution is 6400dpi.

 

From what I can tell, there's no automatic option that makes the lens option for you, at least in the "Professional" mode.

 

This is all moot as I rarely scan over 3200dpi and don't plan on not using negative holders, other than to make contact sheets, which actually look fantastic.

 

Never have had Newton ring problem (yet).

Attached Files


Edited by Avatar, 16 September 2017 - 07:30.



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