Jump to content
STEVEcKONG

Should I buy the 60mm tl macro?

Recommended Posts

Advertisement (gone after registration)

I just committed to this lens. Will await its arrival.

 

For those considering this lens, here's a link to a review of the 60mm TL 2.8 macro:

 

https://photoark.co.uk/index.php/articles/reviews/lenses/165-leica-apo-macro-elmarit-tl-60mm-f2-8-lens

Edited by ropo54

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The following may well annoy and maybe alienate me from those who have already bought the TL 60/2.8 macro … and some who are contemplating acquiring the lens. Personally, I would not consider buying because there are more cost-effective means of achieving close focus on the T/TL/TL2 cameras. Many macro enthusiasts actually prefer manual focus for close-up imaging because it usually offers better / more accurate focus control than AF … and there are many, many legacy manual focus macro lenses available for a fraction of the TL 60/2.8's price. And any competent macro worker could likely achieve (with the T/TL/TL2 and an adapter(s) ) as good or better macro results using e.g. quality 6 element enlarging lenses costing less than $50, or, with the necessary adapters, a s/h Leica 60/2.8 Macro Elmarit R costing less than $450, or a legacy Nikon or Canon 50mm/55mm macro lens costing less than $125 … or even the great unloved Leitz 100/4 Macro Elmar R costing less than $250 ( as used by Jim Lager for the '000s of illustrations in his Leica 'An Illustrated History …' series). Leica enthusiasts seem to be buying the lens without knowing much about the fine art of macro photography and without reading up on the subject beforehand. Nearly all camera manufacturers try and encourage their buyers to acquire the latest AF macro lenses … but they would do that … they have to offer the same types of lenses as their rival manufacturers. There's nothing wrong with the TL 60/2.8 lens and it's fine for non-macro applications … but do you really need one when there are other more cost effective … and focus effective  … close-up photography solutions? If you want to achieve good close-up photographs you're unlikely to succeed on a regular basis without having e.g. the necessary subject and camera/lens supports … and the means (in the broadest sense) of illuminating the subject. If you have not got these already please consider reading up on the subject before diving headlong into buying an AF macro lens. Furthermore, consider one of the simplest and most cost effective macro solutions which has already been used with excellent results by several Leica T enthusiast forum members … get an achromatic supplementary close-up lens and attach it to the end of your standard or tele TL zoom lens.  If you do a search on the forum for Marumi, Polaroid, and Raynox supplementary achromatic c/u lenses … and also Leitz Elpro achromats … you might save yourselves a lot of $$££€€ which you can put towards e.g. a TL 35/1.4 lens. 

 

Best wishes

 

dunk 

 

EDIT: I sent the following to a forum member who was seeking advice about macro imaging last week:

 

Check these images made with enlarging lenses https://www.photomac...pic.php?t=25139 … and there are lots more examples e.g. this weevil was taken using a JML lens which cost just $10 when the manufacturer sold off all his surplus stock https://www.photomac...pic.php?t=34193  So many myths abound about macro lenses; with the exception of the Canon MPE 65mm macro lens , better results can be obtained with much cheaper adapted lenses such as enlarging lenses, older legacy manual focus macro lenses, microscope lenses and reversed manual focus wide angle lenses. It's a vast subject .  Macro photography is all about lighting and technique … and technique includes camera and subject support … the lens is just one part of the equation. You can find out  just about everything there is to know about macro imaging on the Photomacrography Forum … where most participants use relatively simple lenses to achieve their results. 

Edited by dkCambridgeshire

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For a dedicated macro use other lenses might be more cost effective. On the otherside for those who like to use it  a flexible 60mm for portait and other things and as a macro lens its a very nice lens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest NEIL-D-WILLIAMS

I have one on order.

Please tell me what makes a lens $3000 good? Or $50 good? Or $10,000 good?

Paul if you can get the 3000 lens for 50 bucks, think about how much beer you can buy with the 2950 bucks.................that would be good right

:)

 

Neil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with dunk's post above - I have posted a number of shots in the macro range as part of exploring the limits of what the lens is capable of, and I have no aspirations to macro photography beyond this (nor any expertise). That said, the 60TL is an excellent and versatile lens in the same category as the Macro-Elmar-M 90: one that is small and light enough to carry around for close ups of flowers etc while walking, and for occasional portraits and street photography. So no, don't buy it as a macro lens; buy it as a highly versatile short telephoto.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paul if you can get the 3000 lens for 50 bucks, think about how much beer you can buy with the 2950 bucks.................that would be good right

:)

 

Neil

I'm down in SW France at the moment, a good place to spend $2950 on wine.

Edited by LocalHero1953

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest NEIL-D-WILLIAMS

Advertisement (gone after registration)

I'm down in SW France at the moment, a good place to spend $2950 on wine.

 

Shut up........I'm sat on a frigging Oil Rig in Sunny Nigeria

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The nice thing about the 60mm TL macro is its diversity:  a 90 mm, a macro, and as a lens that allows one to otherwise close focus. Excellent IQ as well. AF does hunt as many have said.

 

Some shots (taken with the SL 601, which seems to handle focusing better with the toggle better than the T)

Edited by ropo54

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

some with the 60 from today..handheld

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

more... for some reason I cant upload the files in the same quality they come up on my local display, sorry for that. Ican just tell they are sharp and detailed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not AT ALL a macro specialist, but I used this lens for some close portraits and semi-close lips pictures. Quality was great by the AF - oh my god. It's possible that's the case with every macro lens these days (no idea), but when it didn't lock focus it was searching for it for about 5 seconds (!!!) where the camera was useless. Don't know whether it's normal*, but I wouldn't consider it for portraits

 

* - is it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

* - is it?

Probably!

I find AF is unpredictable with this lens: sometimes good, sometimes painfully slow (moving subjects), sometimes it just cannot find focus (e.g. a small object at some distance from its background). I don't understand why AF continues to be a problem with the TL2, given that Leica has shown how to do it with the SL - and they share the same basic processor and sensor resolution.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Check these images made with enlarging lenses https://www.photomac...pic.php?t=25139 … and there are lots more examples e.g. this weevil was taken using a JML lens which cost just $10 when the manufacturer sold off all his surplus stock https://www.photomac...pic.php?t=34193  So many myths abound about macro lenses; with the exception of the Canon MPE 65mm macro lens , better results can be obtained with much cheaper adapted lenses such as enlarging lenses, older legacy manual focus macro lenses, microscope lenses and reversed manual focus wide angle lenses. It's a vast subject .  Macro photography is all about lighting and technique … and technique includes camera and subject support … the lens is just one part of the equation. You can find out  just about everything there is to know about macro imaging on the Photomacrography Forum … where most participants use relatively simple lenses to achieve their results. 

 

good lord ..... having the patience and dedication to take 1000 shots .... manually .... for focus stacking is in a whole different league to normal photography. 

Edited by thighslapper

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

good lord ..... having the patience and dedication to take 1000 shots .... manually .... for focus stacking is in a whole different league to normal photography. 

 

 

Good Lord they're not all stacked … And there are plenty of sections within the Photomacrography Forum showing use of simple low cost lenses to achieve low magnification close-ups. 

 

dunk 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue., Read more about our Privacy Policy